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Duduk reed plants are also in United States


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#1 Gregorovich

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Posted 02 January 2012 - 09:29 AM

Doing a little research on the reed plant that is used for making the reeds used
in the Armenian Duduk, I stumbled across some information on this plant. It is
known as Giant Reed, Spanish Reed and scientific name is Arundo Donax L. Grown
in Eurasia and Mediterranean areas, it was brought to America as early as the
1800's. One of it's many uses is in the making of woodwind instruments,
including reeds. In the United States it is considered an Invasive Species to
the lower 48, and grows mostly in the warmer zones of the U.S., and in
close proximity to water sources.
Link to where it is grown, *just click on the state to get the counties
of the states that it's most problematic in:
http://plants.usda.g...le?symbol=ARDO4

More found about this reed plant here: http://www.invasives...giantreed.shtml

and of course in Wikipedia here -> http://en.wikipedia....ki/Arundo_donax

Grows in Texas and all the way up to Maryland as well, but doesn't grow well in the northern states
due to climate extremes lows temperature in winters.

Apparently we have an abundance of reed making plants right here in the United
States.


#2 Arpa

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Posted 02 January 2012 - 05:24 PM

Thank you Gregorovich, and Welcome.
Very informative post. I'm sure by now you know that our Captain MosJan is the Duduk officionado.
Hey Mos! What happened to Duduk.com?
We will follow and talk about that plant known as "reed/եղեգ", as well as the musical "reed" .

#3 MosJan

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Posted 04 January 2012 - 01:20 PM

Doing a little research on the reed plant that is used for making the reeds used
in the Armenian Duduk, I stumbled across some information on this plant. It is
known as Giant Reed, Spanish Reed and scientific name is Arundo Donax L. Grown
in Eurasia and Mediterranean areas, it was brought to America as early as the
1800's. One of it's many uses is in the making of woodwind instruments,
including reeds. In the United States it is considered an Invasive Species to
the lower 48, and grows mostly in the warmer zones of the U.S., and in
close proximity to water sources.
Link to where it is grown, *just click on the state to get the counties
of the states that it's most problematic in:
http://plants.usda.g...le?symbol=ARDO4

More found about this reed plant here: http://www.invasives...giantreed.shtml

and of course in Wikipedia here -> http://en.wikipedia....ki/Arundo_donax

Grows in Texas and all the way up to Maryland as well, but doesn't grow well in the northern states
due to climate extremes lows temperature in winters.

Apparently we have an abundance of reed making plants right here in the United
States.



Welcome to Hyeforum..



I can only tell you about duduk reed, not shvi or Blule , since we maker them form Apricot wood
it looks the same and might have the same scientific name, but sorry it's not the same material..
since 1996 we have tested many. even many of our customers have send material form e all over USA.. it looks good but it's no way the same quality.. if you found something that you think you like i'l be more then happy to make a reed for you, you can get hold of me at http://duduk.com, My Name is Movses

most 70% the reed material we use is from Artsax AKA Armenian Republic of Nagorno KArabagh ( not Armenia yet but soon ;) ) , only Soft reed material is from Armenia, and even then most of it is not useful, since it's growing next or to close to Nuclear power station, or drainage pits. old Soviet Factory, Army BAss. you can see old battery and used tires in water + other garbage.. up to 85% reeds you find in the market for duduk are made of this material.. it never passes the basic lead or mercury test. if i cant see the location of the harvest i will not buy material.. don't have use for Toxic Metal..

after searching 3 years we only fund 2 lakes and 3 revers that Toxic test was not passetive & the material was good.. we make our Soft and extra soft duduk reed from this locations. The rest Pro or Professorial duduk reed Gyargyu Yegheg - is from Artsax AKA Armenian Republic of Nagorno KArabagh, we employ 3 people in Artsax to harvest the material, cut and age it, prefabricate the reeds for duduk.com only, it looks like this before fabrication, we import it each year :ap:

goog luck :)

MOvses


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#4 MosJan

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Posted 04 January 2012 - 01:22 PM

PS. you can join http://www.duduk.com/forums/ you can find many good help hints and info on duduk

#5 Gregorovich

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Posted 04 January 2012 - 02:57 PM

I have joined over there at the duduk.com forum under the name of Ollivander (another wand maker, long story)

Nice Delmhorst moisture meter you have http://www.coastalto...orst/j-2000.htm but it won't give you any info other than moisture content. It doesn't analyze heavy metals, only moisture content. According to a study, the ones in the United States grown that were imported from Europe/Asia are one and the same as those found in the areas you mention.

#6 MosJan

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Posted 04 January 2012 - 03:21 PM

all i'm looking for is the moisture content :) to know wan to start making my reeds :) or how fast the reed is drying , or was it the material from last year that was left under the sun that i have no use for it ..
as for taxic tests Lead and mercury tests are conserned :) First Alert LT1 Premium Home Lead Test Kit or Mercury Check Water Test Kit are just some of the many basic products yo can use to test





#7 Gregorovich

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Posted 04 January 2012 - 08:20 PM

For all practicality, the research points that this reed is the same material you import for production of duduk reeds. From Wikipedia.org "Arundo donax was introduced from the Mediterranean to California in the 1820s for roofing material and erosion control in drainage canals in the Los Angeles area (Bell 1997; Mackenzie 2004). Through spread and subsequent plantings as an ornamental plant, and for use as reeds in woodwind instruments, it has become naturalised throughout warm coastal freshwaters of North America, and its range continues to spread." which indicates the use for woodwind instrument reeds. And, also "The stem material is both strong and flexible. It is the principal source material for reeds for woodwind instruments such as the oboe, bassoon, clarinet, and saxophone. It is also often used for the chanter and drone reeds of many different forms of bagpipes. Giant reed has been used to make flutes for over 5,000 years. The pan pipes consist of ten or more reed pipes".

You are correct in that the Arundo donax, Giant Cane, does have the ability to uptake certain heavy metals and other undersirable pollutants into it's stem, so getting a source in clear water and streams would certainly be prudent. It does, however and more importantly where ever it is grown, also uptakes silica, and would depend on the amount of silica availabe in the soil, but it is what gives it some attributs to NOT be used as fodder for forage animals like cattle, and sheep since it (silica) can become a toxic accumulation in the stems.

These plants seem to have a unique ability to survive and thrive even when introduced outside their native habitat. This is what makes them so problematic in areas such as America, in that they really grow well, and have developed ways to keep 'their kind' well established in the world. Since they do not repoduce from seeds, the DNA transfers to each plant in an amost exacting match from plant to plant. Quite similar to the way that certain clone of Vitis vinifera, (wine grapes) have been carefully and systematically repoduced in 'like kind' from their origins in Germany, Fance, Spain and Italy to parts of the United States as well as other countries around the world. Through DNA testing and more specifically, in testing certain DNA markers within the range, we have isolated what we once only knew as Zinfandel in this country to have actually come from a vine in Croatia so many years ago. It's secret lost in the shuffle of plant material brought here so many years ago, now brought to light. Zinfandel is Crljenak from Croatia. BTW, I work as a winemaker in the wine industry here in Michigan, so cloning and plant specifis in DNA are a facinating study to me.

#8 MosJan

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Posted 05 January 2012 - 03:42 PM

:) it's all fine Vern :) if you know or if you have found a good material that you like send it in we will make a reed you. you might of found something that i can;t find in 15 years :)

#9 Gregorovich

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Posted 06 January 2012 - 08:31 PM

Appreciate the offer, Moses, but here in Michigan, even though we may have some decent water supplies, the Giant Reed cannot grow this far north. Perhaps someone in South Carolina, Maryland, Texas or such might read this forum and find it intriguing to send you one for them to have a "native" reed from their neck of the woods. You might keep yourself quite busy there making reeds for the duduk community where these things grow. Imagine, playing your duduk with your own hand picked and selected reed, and fashioned by a master reed maker for you? It might not play well, but it also might surprise you. Discovery is the genius of life.

Edited by Gregorovich, 06 January 2012 - 08:31 PM.





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