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Holy Transfiguration Armenian Church opens in Moscow Holy Transfigurat


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#1 MosJan

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Posted 17 September 2013 - 01:17 PM

Holy Transfiguration Armenian Church opens in Moscow
170063.jpg
set_w1_eng.gif September 17, 2013 - 12:41 AMT

PanARMENIAN.Net - The consecration of Holy Transfiguration Church is ongoing Tuesday, September 17 in Moscow, with Catholicos of All Armenians Karekin II, President Serzh Sargsyan, representatives of Russia’s Armenian Diaspora, and high-ranking officials attending the opening.

The consecration is performed by the Catholicos of All Armenians and the primate of the New Nakhichevan and Russian Diocese of the Armenian Apostolic Church.

The ceremony will be followed by the opening of exhibits titled Armenians of Moscow and Historic Journey as well as the Love and Fraternity theatrical performance.

 



#2 MosJan

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Posted 17 September 2013 - 01:19 PM

http://armenpress.am...-in-moscow.html



#3 Arpa

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Posted 17 September 2013 - 02:23 PM

Armenian Church in Moscow?

When did Moscow become an Armenian City?

Anyone, I mean any Armenian still live in Armenia?

Soon all that vacuum will be filled by you know who.

Remember when we migrated from places like Sebastia, Garin, Kharberd et al, and migrated to stanbull?

Guess who filled the void.

In my book an AEMENIAN CHURCH can only be in ARMENIA, not even in places we call Western Armenia, aka furkey.

Do we have 1001 churches yet, remember Ani?

I know a few other places where we don’t have so called Armenian Churches.

Kamchatka and Timbuktu. Do you know where they are?

Kamchatka

http://www.kamchatkatravel.net/imgs/maps/w_map.jpg

Timbuktu

http://news.nationalgeoghttp://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2003/05/photogalleries/timbouctu/images/primary/map_mali.jpg

 



#4 MosJan

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Posted 19 September 2013 - 10:27 AM

Holy Transfiguration: A new Armenian Cathedral in Moscow is called to strengthen the faith and Armenian-Russian relations

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#5 MosJan

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Posted 19 September 2013 - 10:28 AM

By Julia Hakobyan
ArmeniaNow Deputy Editor

 

After 17 years of construction, a splendid Armenian Cathedral complex was opened in Moscow this week, combining the centuries-old traditions of Armenian architecture, modern solutions and reflecting the hopes of half a million strong Armenian Diaspora in Moscow for the prosperity of their community and expectations for the new stage of Armenian-Russian relations.


The consecration of the complex was led by His Holiness Karekin II, the Supreme Patriarch and Catholicos of All Armenians, and attended by Armenian President Serzh Sargsyan, Patriarch of Moscow and All Russia Kirill, as well as by government and public figures of Armenia and Russia and representatives of religious denominations.

Catholicos Karekin II presented the cathedral, called the Holy Transfiguration, what is believed to be a particle of the cross on which Jesus Christ was crucified.

"Raised in the heart of Russia - Moscow, this complex will be the spiritual and cultural center in the lives of those who, regardless of nationality, consider themselves the carriers of Christian and human values,” said Bishop Yezras Nersissian, the Primate of the Armenian Diocese of Russia and New Nakhijevan, “Church is not just a stone building. Every stone in it is the faith of every Armenian.”

The construction of the complex has largely become possible thanks to Bishop Yezras, who over recent years attracted investments and revived the project that was factually frozen due to the lack of funding.

The area for construction was allocated by the Moscow authorities yet in 1996 on the territory adjacent to Olympic Avenue. Construction was scheduled to be completed by 2001, but it was stopped soon after the project was launched. The foundation of the cathedral was laid in 2004.

The complex which covers an area of 1.32 hectares includes the Cathedral, the chapel of the Holy Cross, a museum, a library, bishop's residence, conference rooms, educational complex, guest house, refectory, and underground parking for 200 cars.

The Cathedral’s perimeter is decorated with the carved images of the Savior, images of saints, crosses, inscriptions of St. Mesrop Mashtots and historical plots, telling the adoption of Christianity in Armenia, the creation of written language and the life of the Armenian martyrs.

The Cathedral, resembling ancient temples of Armenia, has four entrances; the main entrance is located on the bell tower, which has stalactite vault- the unique type of decoration coverage, forgotten since the Middle Ages, and used after seven hundred years for the first time in that cathedral.

The height of the Cathedral, together with the cross makes 58 meters; the diameter of the dome, decorated with 72 crosses, is 21 meters.

"Armenian architecture is peculiar with its austerity. But we believe that beyond we need to show the best that we have achieved over the centuries, such as rich architectural forms, decorations, ornaments, bas-reliefs, pictures of saints,” said Artak Gulyan, the architect of the complex, which was built mainly on tuff, brought to Moscow specially for the cathedral’s construction from the village Anipemza of Shirak’s province.

The opening of the Cathedral took place two weeks after Armenia’s decision to join the Customs Union – a decision that Armenian authorities called unlikely a few months ago, and which, according to many local analysts, would cost Armenia the closure of European doors.

Armenian-Russian relations have been given a considerable part in the official speeches of both of the Armenian and Russian religious leaders.

Patriarch Kirill said that the opening of the temple is “the recovering of historical justice”. He noted that the Armenian community has suffered along with other Christian communities in Russia during “hard times” (meaning religion’s repression during communism), and the churches that were built with love by Armenian people in Russia have often been destroyed.

Catholicos Karekin II said that the cathedral seeks to "multiply the blessings and gifts sent down from heaven in a multi-traditional country, in the life of the Armenians who had settled in Russia, and Christ-loving brotherly Russian people”, and wished the Armenian –Russian friendship to "remain forever strong.”

Leaving politics aside, many view the new Armenian Cathedral as a striking example of Armenian architecture, and the pride of the Armenian community in Moscow, the city which hosts, according to various estimates, from half a million to a million Armenians.

Until recently, the spiritual place for Armenian community was a small chapel in the Armenian part of Vagankova cemetery, where religious holidays ceremonies, funerals, and weddings and been held. The size and the location of the chapel had long ago become impractical for meeting the needs of parishioners.

The new church complex is the largest complex of the Armenian Apostolic Church outside of Armenia, after the Mother See of Holy Echmiadzin.



#6 Armenak

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Posted 21 September 2013 - 08:46 PM

Armenian Church in Moscow?

When did Moscow become an Armenian City?

Anyone, I mean any Armenian still live in Armenia?

Soon all that vacuum will be filled by you know who.

Remember when we migrated from places like Sebastia, Garin, Kharberd et al, and migrated to stanbull?

Guess who filled the void.

In my book an AEMENIAN CHURCH can only be in ARMENIA, not even in places we call Western Armenia, aka furkey.

Do we have 1001 churches yet, remember Ani?

I know a few other places where we don’t have so called Armenian Churches.

Kamchatka and Timbuktu. Do you know where they are?

Kamchatka

http://www.kamchatkatravel.net/imgs/maps/w_map.jpg

Timbuktu

http://news.nationalgeoghttp://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2003/05/photogalleries/timbouctu/images/primary/map_mali.jpg

 

Don't know about Timbuktu but I'm sure they'll construct one in Kamchatka soon enough.  :lol:

 

I agree, Arpa. I believe the largest Armenian cathedral in the Russian empire was the one in Baku…until it was demolished by the Soviet government, that is. And let's not forget the appropriation of Armenian churches by the Georgian Orthodox Church, which still goes on today. When the shit hits the fan, these structures which are meant to demonstrate wealth and power (are we supposed to believe it's piety?) are rendered meaningless. Yet our people continue to build them, bigger and bigger, from Krasnodar to Krasnoyarsk…



#7 Yervant1

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Posted 22 September 2013 - 10:22 AM

If only they would contribute half the amount of the cost of these churches as grants to scientists in the homeland, so that they won't leave the country. Just imagine the amount of new discoveries they would come up with, just imagine!!!!!!!!!!!!!



#8 MosJan

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 12:18 PM

Yervand jan shat aveli $$$ qan du patkeratsnum es grvum e  Hayastani gitnakannnerin, ughaki tegh chi hasnnum

inchvor mi tegh $$$  korchum e.... kam  lavaguyn depqum mi chnchin gumar e  hasnum mardkants um pit hasner...

 

artasahmanits  GRANT stanal@  mi tarber bussnes e... yev bavakanin  shahavet vomats  hamar



#9 Yervant1

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 01:44 PM

I guess it's back to the age old situation, which is corruption. No hope for Armenia :(  because corruption will never end.



#10 gamavor

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Posted 24 September 2013 - 08:16 AM



Apart from everything said above, the half million Armenians living in Moscow until recently had only a small chapel in the central cemetery, which could not serve the religious needs of the congregation. It is the biggest Armenian church outside Armenia and naturally it is located in Moscow. By the way, large number of Russian benefectors (oligarhs if you please) also contibuted for the construction of the church and the whole complex.

#11 Arpa

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Posted 24 September 2013 - 11:35 AM

If only they would contribute half the amount of the cost of these churches as grants to scientists in the homeland, so that they won't leave the country. Just imagine the amount of new discoveries they would come up with, just imagine!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Yeah, Yeah. We know.

When will Serzh/Sergey , whatever the H*** his name SarGSYan my srban is, will inaugurate this “church” in Timbultu?

http://listenonlinequran.blogspot.com/2012/11/djenna-mosque-in-timbuktu-mali.html

What the hell is Serge/Sergey? It is SargIs, (neither the stanbull) Sarkiss. When will we once again start speaking Armenian and not name our children Sergey Sergeyevich., or Nourhan Nourhanoghlu.

Is it like this Sergei

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sergei_Parajanov

Once again. How many Armenians are left in the Yerevan Province?

It seems there are more so called Armenians in Moscow than in the entire so called country Armenia.

Aside. What is the language, beside the Grabar Patarak, in that cathedral in Moscow. I

n what language do they deliver the sermon, and what they call God//Astuats?

бог German GOT. hopefully not the furkish “geot”. How the Russians write and pronounce Ejmiatsin?

And, how do they in stanbull pray to God? allah?

Allahmuz or erkinqn es?

To not forget that in the English speaking communities the Lord’s Prayer Hayr Mer is known as Our Father.

A friend, a deacon for over 40 years, thought that the “yeghitsi/to be” was a typo, that it meant “yegeghetsi”.

So much about churches in Moscow, Kamchatka and Timbuktu.


Edited by Arpa, 24 September 2013 - 11:43 AM.


#12 Yervant1

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 11:48 AM

How Many Churches Are One Too Many?

By: RAFFI BEDROSYAN

When someone visits Armenia for the first time, the tour itinerary invariably includes a

multitude of churches and monasteries. Modern Armenia is a land of churches. Historic

Armenia in Anatolia was also a land of churches, with nearly 4,000 churches and

monasteries. The Van Lake region alone had over 300 churches. Ancient Ani, dubbed the

"City of 1001 Churches", had 40 churches. We are proud of our churches, awed by their

architectural beauty and intricate construction techniques, amazed at their settings perched

on inaccessible mountaintops.

Saint Gregory Illuminator Cathedral in Yerevan

On the other hand, this obsession with churches, when combined with our tragic history,

makes me wonder: "I wish we had fewer churches to visit and instead many more victory

monuments such as Sardarabad. I wish our Armenian kings, political leaders and wealthy

notables in the past had spent less time, talent, resources and money on these churches and

instead, more on fortifications and defence of our lands and territories. When one delves

more into the historic reasons why these churches were built, it becomes apparent that they

were not necessarily built to meet the religious needs of the population, but to bring glory to

the benefactor and perhaps to help him "ease into heaven". Throughout history, our religious

leaders have conditioned the benefactors that there is no better way to serve God, Jesus

Christ and their Armenian folk than to build another church. Therefore, regardless of political,

economic or social realities and upheavals, Armenians have continued building churches in

historic and modern Armenia, as well as in all corners of the world, often disregarding other

needs and priorities. This was the case in medieval Armenian kingdoms in historic Armenia,

continuing in Cilicia and Eastern Anatolia until 1915, then in Diaspora and now in modern

Armenia.

The tradition continues today. When future generations look back into the present 22 year-old

Armenia and Diaspora Armenians, they will see the challenges of establishing a new country

from the ruins of the Soviet Empire, at the same time fighting the deadly Karabagh war, the

closed borders and economic blockade by Turkey and Azerbaijan, simultaneously dealing

with the disastrous 1989 earthquake, and most critically, the continuing depopulation of

Armenia due to lack of employment and investment opportunities. And yet, despite these

monumental tasks, they will also see examples of vast church-building activities in Armenia

and in the Diaspora. In 1997, in the midst of urgent needs to reconstruct Armenia ravaged by

the earthquake and Karabagh destroyed by war, Armenians did find the money to build the

Saint Gregory Illuminator Cathedral in Yerevan. In 2001 Armenians in Los Angeles started the

construction of a huge cathedral, while there was and is scarce money to keep Armenian

schools open. In 2011, an oligarch donated all the funds to build the St Hovhannes Cathedral

in Abovyan, while the starving local population had almost emptied the town. Just last month,

wealthy Russian-Armenians opened a vast new cathedral in Moscow. The Echmiadzin

Catholicosate has become a state within a state, a Vatican-like complex expanding

continuously with new buildings. The combined total expenditure on these large churches, as

well as several other smaller church projects, easily exceeds $200 million. These projects are

not funded from revenue-generating sources or regular budgets, but instead, from one-time

significant donations of benefactors, mostly from the Diaspora. They will not generate any

revenues but will create a continuing need for additional donations for upkeep and

maintenance.

St. Hovhannes Cathedral in Abovyan

One wonders if these donations could be used for more worthwhile projects, such as helping

Armenians remain in Armenia, or helping Armenians remain Armenian in the Diaspora. There

seems to be a widely accepted belief that neither the government nor the church is in touch

with the concerns and needs of the common people. During a recent private audience with

the Catholicos, he was asked what the Church can do to keep our youth more interested in

the Armenian Church and attached closer to their Armenian roots. His curt response was that

this "should be done at home and at school". The much-anticipated Bishops' Synod,

assembled last month for the first time in 600 years, did not produce any tangible resolutions

to address concerns of the ordinary Armenian, be it in Armenia or the Diaspora. Most

benefactors do not want or trust to invest in Armenia due to the fear that government

corruption and bribes will make their investment useless and therefore, will not generate

economic benefits for themselves nor help the Armenian population. Unless the government

takes concrete steps to change the valid perception that investments only end up in the hands

of the governing oligarchs, there will not be much participation in the desperately needed

economic growth of Armenia, which is essential to keep the Armenians from leaving Armenia.

In the meantime, the church leaders continue preaching the tried and true argument that the

most beneficial donation a benefactor can make for himself and his family is giving to the

church.

New Armenian Cathedral in Moscow

Of course, there are truly worthwhile church building and restoration projects, with strategic

and significant benefits for all Armenians. One example is the restoration of the

Ghazantchetsots Church in Shushi, undertaken immediately after the Karabagh war. During

the war, Azeris controlling Shushi had used this historic church as an arms depot and military

centre, while continuously bombarding Stepanakert below in the valley. Their reasoning was

that Armenians would never attack and fire on their church. When Armenian commandos

victoriously entered Shushi in May 1992, they found the church in shambles, burnt,

desecrated and full of human excrement. Today, it stands as a symbol of victory against all

odds.

The other critical restoration project is the total reconstruction of the Diyarbakir/Dikranagerd

Surp Giragos Church in 2011, the first time an Armenian church was restored as an Armenian

church in historic Armenia after being destroyed in 1915. This project is strategically

significant for a number of reasons: First, the restored church became concrete evidence

against the denialist state version of history of the government of Turkey, demonstrating that

there was a large Armenian presence in Anatolia before 1915. Secondly, it immediately

became a religious and cultural centre helping the Turkish and Kurdish population of Turkey

understand the realities of 1915, through media events, conferences and concerts. Thirdly,

the foundation which restored the church started the process to reclaim the properties

belonging to the church but confiscated after 1915, with several properties already secured

through negotiations and courts, for the first time since 1915. Fourth, the church became a

living Genocide memorial, attracting tens of thousands of Armenian visitors from the Diaspora

and Armenia, helping start a dialogue and better relationship with liberated Kurds and Turks

who have faced the historical truths of 1915, and now demand their government to do so.

Last but not least, the most significant outcome of the restoration of this church has been the

emergence of the hidden Armenians. Islamicized Armenians have started ‘coming out’,

visiting and praying in the church, getting baptized, participating in Armenian language

courses, helping build an Armenian museum on the church grounds, contributing to the

security and administration of the church, demanding acceptance of their real identity by the

government, and so on. The church acts like a magnet for these people, with over one

hundred people visiting daily on average, coming from all over Anatolia, not just Diyarbakir,

trying to find their Armenian roots. New initiatives underway to restore and reclaim other

destroyed Armenian churches and monasteries in historic Armenia will help accelerate all

these outcomes.

Diyarbakir/Dikranagerd Surp Giragos Church inscription

It is my sincere hope that future government and Church leaders, as well as future

benefactors, will decide more wisely on what projects to invest in, giving higher priority to the

needs and wants of the Armenian people than their own.

Toronto, Canada






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