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Possible Translation, please?


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#1 Sarook

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Posted 07 November 2012 - 08:03 PM

Hi All,

I'm hoping to get a translation, on a name please.

My Father's English name is Michael.
His Armenian name is Hamayag. (sp?)

I know that Hamayag doesn't mean Michael, but I don't have a clue what it means. Neither does my Dad. His parents don't know either.

Im hoping someone can please help as one little step to keeping my heiratage alive.

As a side note, I've given my Children Armenian names.

Kennedy has a name of Keiranoush
Cole has a name of Boghos.

Thanks all.

Cheers.

#2 ED

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Posted 08 November 2012 - 07:42 AM

HMAYAK, comes from the word HMAYQ, which means a Joy, a plesent site, for instance you have a beautiful eyes

du unes hmayeli achqer, you have a beautiful smile, du unes hmayeli jpit.

I hope this helps :yes:

#3 Arpa

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Posted 08 November 2012 - 08:29 AM

Good question. The more I search the more confused I get, depending who is defining**. All the way from wizardry and magic, Lest I confuse us I will make this concise.
This was interesting and news to me. From the on line site;

HMAYAK =From Armenian hmayk "charm" + ak "eye" i.e. "charming eyes". The short forms are Hamik, Hamak, Hamo

Above it is suggested that it means charm/blue bead, anti evil-eye.
From what I have known the word is based on hmayk/charm, hmayel/to charm. Hence it would mean CHARMING, and HMAYICH would mean CHARMER.
This is silly. :silly:
http://unclestu.com/...ake-charmer.jpg
** See what Ed said above

#4 Arpa

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Posted 08 November 2012 - 09:01 AM

PS. Above I neglected to add that one of the most ccommon translation is TALISMAN

#5 Arpa

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Posted 08 November 2012 - 09:20 AM

The most famous and best known Hmayak is/was the poet Hamo Sahian, born as Hmayak Sahaki Grigorian

#6 Arpa

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Posted 08 November 2012 - 10:33 AM

Based on thr above daffinishun :jester:

HMAYAK =From Armenian hmayk "charm" + ak "eye" i.e. "charming eyes". The short forms are Hamik, Hamak, Hamo


Here is a picture of Hmayak :goof:

http://profile.ak.fb...4099_6701_n.jpg

#7 Yervant1

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Posted 08 November 2012 - 10:34 AM

Would it be fair to say that it means a person of good looks and stature.

#8 Arpa

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Posted 08 November 2012 - 10:40 AM

No Yervant. Look up at any good dictionary and see, it simply means CHARM(ing).
Are you thinking of BERJ?

#9 Yervant1

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Posted 08 November 2012 - 11:10 AM

I'm more in line with Ed, like hmayitch atcqer or hmayitch jpit or good looks, hmayitch nkaragir hence good looks that make one stand out.

#10 Arpa

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Posted 08 November 2012 - 12:11 PM

I should shut up before I make a bigger fool of myself.. I will after you see this from Ghapantsian- Batsatrakan Bararan. Volume 3 page 113/ 1261 and on;
http://nayiri.com/im...pageNumber=1261
Can we see the above site? Can we read Armenian?

Edited by Arpa, 08 November 2012 - 12:19 PM.


#11 Nané

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Posted 08 November 2012 - 02:06 PM

I think Arpa's explanation is the correct one. This is what we find in the dictionary Arpa is referring to

Հմայեակ

1. կախարդություն պարունակող գիր. հմայիլ, պահպանակ

2. հմուտ, ճարտար



Hmayak (Hemayag) - 1. writting that entails magical powers, protector

2. skilled, masterly



It seems that հմայիլ is the same as համայիլ, which is from the Farsi hemayil, which is an item you hang around your neck to protect you from evil. It is typically a long strip of paper with prayers written on it.



I think the name Hmayak (Hemayag) probably means skilled.

Edited by Nané, 09 November 2012 - 11:11 AM.


#12 Arpa

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Posted 08 November 2012 - 02:44 PM

When the posts by our dear friends like Nane turn to rubbish it is time our ads reconsider. I applied HTML to her quote, see if it will sustain. --- === --- I think Arpa's explanation is the correct one. This is what we find in the dictionary Arpa is referring to
Հմայեակ
1. կախարդություն պարունակող գիր. հմայիլ, պահպանակ
2. հմուտ, ճարտար

Hmayak (Hemayag) - 1. writting that entails magical powers, protector
2. skilled, masterly

It seems that հմայիլ is the same as համայիլ, which is from the Farsi hemayil, which is an item you hang around your neck to protect you from evil. It is typically a long strip of paper with prayers written on it.

I think the name Hmayak (Hemayag) probably means skilled. Edited by Nané, Today, 08:09 PM.

Edited by Arpa, 08 November 2012 - 02:51 PM.


#13 Yervant1

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Posted 08 November 2012 - 03:17 PM

Arpa I don't understand, why you take every post as an attack to your version of explanation when in reality a member is stating as to what they think. You are right since you quote from the dictionary just like Nane. Having said that as we all know language is an evolving thing and sometimes the meaning of a word could change in time to mean something else, hence mine and Ed's explanation make some sense at least it does to me, but I stand corrected no harm done. Nane also gave her input without making it personal. This is how we come to a conclusion if I may say so. Consider this as my reply to your PM. :)

#14 Arpa

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Posted 08 November 2012 - 04:23 PM

What they THINK, THEY THINK? it means?

I rest my case.
The rest is silence.
We stated that Hmayak/Hmayq means CHARM and we stand by it.
Besides, we have no right to butcher this thread started by Sarook

Edited by Arpa, 08 November 2012 - 04:33 PM.


#15 Arpa

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Posted 08 November 2012 - 05:25 PM

:oops:
One last THINKING.
Above where Nane cites hmout,jartar it has nothing to do with hmayk.
It is an altogether other word.
It is based on mit/mout/mitq/thought. As in mtatsel, to think. Where the H prefix is inserted to mout/hmout.

Edited by Arpa, 08 November 2012 - 05:39 PM.


#16 Sarook

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Posted 08 November 2012 - 06:37 PM

Thanks to all who took the time to reply.

Cheers.

#17 ED

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Posted 08 November 2012 - 06:41 PM

OK I think our new member got the idea, Arpa jan I could have made it complicated but why?

man, I wish I have your energy when I'll be at your age:)

#18 Arpa

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Posted 08 November 2012 - 07:30 PM

What do you mean (your age)?
I am only 17 going on to 18.
The only difference is, I don't fire from the hip. Often I do.
I spend hours, somtimes days searching and researching before I shoot from the hip so to speak.
What kind of dictionary do you have, beside the russky/armansky/farsky?
To set things straight, I can read arabo-farsi and some russky. Can you?

Edited by Arpa, 08 November 2012 - 07:43 PM.


#19 ED

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Posted 09 November 2012 - 10:20 AM

I dont have a dictionery Arpa, I do speak fluent russky, Armenian and some farsi, i never shot from my hip dude

chapavory barreret mets mart

you dont know how to take a compliment

#20 Nané

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Posted 09 November 2012 - 11:14 AM

I am now really really REALLY confused. I marked the HTML checkbox when I posted my reply and it posted just fine ... the Armenian was visible and all. When I checked today it was all gibberish. Then I clicked edit post, did not change anything and saved it ... the Armenian writing was visible again. Am I doing something wrong or is it a glitch in the system?




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