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#344179 At 21, this aerospace engineering student, former refugee has created

Posted by Yervant1 on 07 January 2019 - 10:16 AM

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The Globe & Mail, Canada
Jan 4 2019
 
 
At 21, this aerospace engineering student, former refugee has created her first invention
 
LES PERREAUX
 
 
Shoushi Bakarian, an aerospace engineering student at Concordia University, poses for a photograph with a ventilation device that she redesigned for Cessna Aircraft, at Stratos Aviation in Montreal on Oct. 30, 2018. Bakarian arrived from Syria in 2016.
 
 
This is part of Stepping Up, a series introducing Canadians to their country’s new sources of inspiration and leadership.
 
The distance from Aleppo to the lab at Montreal’s Trudeau airport where a young engineer-in-training is perfecting her first invention is 8,580 kilometres, but Shoushi Bakarian’s trajectory might better be measured in light speed.
 
Three years ago, Ms. Bakarian was sitting in Lebanon, part of a family of four Syrian refugees facing an uncertain future with hope of making a new start in Canada. Fast-forward those 36 months: Ms. Bakarian is in her third year of aerospace engineering at Montreal’s Concordia University. She has learned her fourth language, French – in addition to English, Arabic and Armenian. She’s got two part-time jobs with promising prospects in her field: one in the parts department at Bombardier Aerospace and another at Stratos Aviation, a small aviation and flight simulation firm. There, she’s co-created her first invention in the lab she’s building. Oh, and she leads a Scout troop where she hopes to influence her young charges.
 
She’s 21. “I want to reach girls and tell them they don’t have to limit themselves to traditional jobs, like teachers. Especially for girls from my community, they have a very limited idea of what’s out there,” Ms. Bakarian says. “I want to become an example.”
 
On a recent late fall day, Ms. Bakarian tinkers with the tiny generator fan blades of her latest accomplishment: The Ventus, a 5-volt accessory charger for Cessna airplanes that runs off the aircraft’s air vents and as an added bonus cools the air by compressing it. The simple blue tube prototype seems likely to become a must-have accessory for pilots who rely on tablets and smartphones for aviation computation but fly aircraft that were mostly built long before the smartphone era.
 
“I like clean energy, solar power, wind power, so we developed it further to add on the charger idea,” she says. “I spent my summer designing, drawing and testing until it worked.”
 
Naor Cohen, the owner of Stratos Aviation, hired Ms. Bakarian within days of meeting her during an outreach program for women in aviation about a year ago. Ms. Bakarian started out as an instructor on the company’s flight simulators. One day he shared an idea he had to improve cooling small Cessna cabins by using a Venturi tube to compress and cool the air. He invited her to set up a lab with computers and 3-D printers and she ran with it.
 
“I guess she must sleep very little,” Mr. Cohen says. “We’ve never seen her as an employee, and more as a partner in the team. She’s free to come whenever stuff needs to be done. Right now, she’s concentrating mainly on the lab. We want to put that imagination and creativity to work more.”
 
Ms. Bakarian arrived in Canada on Christmas Eve, 2015, with her father, Antaranik, her mother, Ani, and her now-24-year-old sister, Meghri. The daughters had high school diplomas earned during the Syrian civil war with rockets flying overhead and bombs bursting not far from their Armenian school in Aleppo.
 
Small details come back to Ms. Bakarian as she remembers the time. “Our school was in the firing line, so we had to study in a kindergarten in these tiny little chairs,” she recalls. “I always make jokes about it, but it’s not funny.”
 
By 2015, the battle for Aleppo had settled into a stalemate and her family was stuck. “In Grade 10, the big bombs started, by Grade 11, we were without electricity or running water or internet. Some people started to leave but we didn’t know how to get out of Aleppo. We didn’t know who was on the road waiting to kidnap us. … Once the missiles started falling, we didn’t know where they were coming from or where they’d land.”
 
A turning point came when her mother needed surgery that had to be performed in Lebanon. The medical issue combined with mounting violence forced the family to make a move. They spent a year in Lebanon while she recovered. Her parents concluded the family would have limited education and work opportunities in that country. That’s when Canada opened the doors to Syrian refugees.
 
In those early Canadian winter days, the family enrolled in French classes while all four of them set about finding work. Ms. Bakarian got hired at McDonald’s, a job she kept as she enrolled at Concordia, which helped her family survive while her parents found work in the garment industry. It was a step down from her father’s previous job managing a tools warehouse. Meghri, meanwhile, is specializing in child studies at Concordia.
 
Ms. Bakarian is grateful for the sacrifices her parents made, but she made some, too. She was almost crushed by workload as a first-year university student who was working 30 hours a week at her fast food job. “I was physically, emotionally and mentally exhausted,” she says. “But now I’m making up for it. My family is okay now, and it’s easier.”
 
Arpi Hamalian, an education professor emerita at Concordia University, took the younger Bakarian women under her wing when they showed up at an orientation in early 2016. “They were looking a little lost,” Dr. Hamalian recalls now, but it didn’t take long for them to get on track. “Shoushi, well both girls really, know exactly who they are and where they are going. They are unbelievably talented, focused and team-oriented. There aren’t many like them.”
 

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#344052 The Country The World Says Doesn't Exist

Posted by onjig on 07 November 2018 - 11:13 AM


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#342970 ArmHiTec

Posted by gamavor on 29 March 2018 - 02:40 PM


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#342937 First “smart crossroad” in Yerevan

Posted by gamavor on 22 March 2018 - 12:46 PM

https://armenpress.a...affic-jams.html

YEREVAN, MARCH 22, ARMENPRESS. The Traffic Police of Armenia continues taking measures to ensure smooth traffic. ARMENPRESS reports an innovation has been put into operation in one of the crossroads of Yerevan. The Traffic Police have installed an ultrasound sensor at the crossroad of Etchmiadzin highway and the road to the airport that calculates the traffic flow and regulate the crossroad, as a result of which congestions are avoided.
Those devices are a novelty not only in Armenia, but also in the region. The ultrasound sensors are produced in Armenia. Its only a few days the sensors are put into operation, but according to the Police Traffic, positive change is already evident.
The ultrasound sensors do not allow congestions on the crossroads. Within a few seconds the device calculates the number of vehicles and changes the colors of the traffic light.
This is the first smart crossroad in Armenia. The Traffic Police rule out any congestion here.
The Traffic Police are studying other crossroads to install the devices. Soon there will be more smart crossroads without congestions.


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#342520 Armenian doctor successfully treats advanced ovarian cancer in an 82 y

Posted by Yervant1 on 15 December 2017 - 11:16 AM

168.am
 
 
16:36 | December 13 2017
Categories
  Armenian doctor successfully treats advanced ovarian cancer in an 82 year-old woman in CT. emaxhealth.com
 
 
 
 
Share
 
norwalk_hospital_dr_andikyan.jpg
 
 

EmaxHealth wrote: Doctor Vaagn Andikyan of Armenian decent, attributes the successful treatment and good prognosis to the delivery of high quality, compassionate care, and team-based collaboration by cancer care experts at the Danbury Hospital.

Mary Bonomo, an 82-year-old resident of Bethel, Connecticut, spent the day after Christmas last year in an emergency department with shortness of breath. On New Year’s Eve 2016, she learned that cancer cells had migrated from her ovaries to her lungs. She was diagnosed with stage IV ovarian cancer. Mrs. Bonomo will celebrate this holiday season cancer-free thanks to the excellent care she received at Danbury Hospital.

Mrs. Bonomo was diagnosed while visiting her daughter in Maryland. She chose Danbury Hospital to manage her cancer when she returned home. She consulted with Vaagn Andikyan, MD, a Western Connecticut Health Network (WCHN) gynecological oncologist who practices at Danbury and Norwalk hospitals. Dr. Andikyan and a team of cancer experts from the Praxair Cancer Center at Danbury Hospital, including medical oncologist Wenli Gao, MD, recommended an intense treatment plan: systemic chemotherapy to reduce the cancerous tumors before undergoing major debulking surgery, followed by post-op chemotherapy.

According to the American Cancer Society, about half of the women who are diagnosed with ovarian cancer are 63 years or older. The American Cancer Society also estimates that a woman’s risk of getting ovarian cancer during her lifetime is about 1 in 75, and her lifetime chance of dying from ovarian cancer is about 1 in 100.

Mrs. Bonomo was one of the few patients over 80 years old to be treated for advanced ovarian cancer at Danbury Hospital in 2017.

Despite her age, Dr. Andikyan was optimistic that Mrs. Bonomo would respond well to the treatment plan because of her mindset and her support system, including her husband of 58 years, three children, nine grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren.

“Not all 80 year olds are the same. Mrs. Bonomo was very mobile and had a good support system. She wanted to fight the cancer and we supported her. We took good care of her in an expeditious fashion,” said Dr. Andikyan.

“Dr. Andikyan was very confident. He helped me feel like I had a chance to have a positive outcome. I felt better after I left his office. I felt hopeful. I am very grateful and blessed for that,” said Mrs. Bonomo.

Mrs. Bonomo had her initial chemotherapy January–July 2017 at the Praxair Cancer Center at Danbury Hospital. “The nurses kept it fun. They helped take something that was rather unpleasant and make it a whole lot better. They were wonderful and kept my spirits up throughout the process,” she said. She had successful, major debulking surgery on July 21, 2017, and finished post-op chemotherapy in November. Mrs. Bonomo, an enthusiastic painter, is back to her normal life.

“The services I received from my doctors and nurses at Danbury Hospital and the Praxair Cancer Center are top of the line and changed my life. I am very thankful,” she said.

Dr. Andikyan attributes Mrs. Bonomo’s successful treatment and good prognosis to teamwork and the exceptional, safe, advanced care Danbury Hospital delivers.

Read full articel here.

 
 
 

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#342144 WESTERN ARMENIA (Videos)

Posted by Arshak1946 on 26 October 2017 - 11:43 AM

 

4 Minutes of video about Western Armenia , I hope video interest you.

 

Best Regards


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#341986 Armenian-Produced Electric Car Debuts

Posted by onjig on 05 October 2017 - 10:13 AM

Armenian-Produced Electric Car Debuts at DigiTec Tech Expo in Yerevan

 

YEREVAN—An Armenian-made electric car debuted at the 13th annual DigiTec tech expo, which opened in Yerevan earlier today. The electric-powered, self-driving car, which was assembled in Armenia by National Instruments, was unveiled at the “Engineering City” pavilion of the three-day exhibition.

 

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An Armenian-made electric car debuted at the 13th annual DigiTec tech expo (Photo: Mediamax)

 

“The whole world is working on [electric cars] and we should do the same in Armenia,” National Instruments’ Ruben Simonyan told Yerevan-based Itel.am. “We need to increase the number of electric cars and the percentage of self-driving or driver assistance systems. We’re exhibiting the electric car we assembled in Armenia. Essentially, it’s a continuation of our engineering culture. This isn’t a novelty. The first electric car was assembled in Armenia back in 1975. Now we should extend that culture,” said Simonyan.

The car is equipped with several driver-assist devices, such as radars, a camera, and laser equipment. Though the sensors and equipment were not produced in Armenia, National Instruments worked on the design and testing of the entire system.

“To make sure that the car will operate smoothly in different situations, you need to drive millions of kilometers. Producers used to do exactly that and some of them still do,” Simonyan explained. “But that requires too much time and expense, which affects the car’s price. Our testing doesn’t require driving millions of kilometers in specialized areas. We can simulate the same scenario for several times to make sure the system is working fine.”

A team of around 20 engineers and designers worked on designing and testing the car, collaborating with several foreign companies.

DigiTec is the largest technological exhibition of the region and runs Sep. 29-Oct. 1 at the Yerevan Expo Center.

https://armenianweek...xpo-in-yerevan/


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#341762 Irina Bokova the bolshevic slut

Posted by gamavor on 06 September 2017 - 08:10 AM

All these should not stop here. Armenian authorities through diplomatic channels as well as the UN should request thorough investigation, esp. with regards to Bokova end company.

For Christ sake, on top of everything she gave UNESCO's Mozart prize to Mehriban Alieva. The later I'm sure did not know how to hold a violin.
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#341733 Irina Bokova the bolshevic slut

Posted by gamavor on 05 September 2017 - 06:35 AM

Before being accused of using harsh language, I would like to explain my words. Irina Bokova is an offspring of Georgi Bokov - a prominent Bulgarian communist rumored that is responsible for the murder of a prominent Bulgarian intellectual and political figure Rajko Alexsiev after the communist takeover of the country. Since the data are very scares of what exactly happened, it is proved that her father was instrumental in the torture of Rajko Alexsiev before his death. Sons and daughters are not responsible for the deeds of their parents, but having been raised in communist Bulgaria and knowing pretty well the background of her surrounding and political elites at the time, she could not know that the foundation which sponsored the event in Paris promoting the "tolerance" of Azerbaijan where everything Armenian is simply banned, is named after Geidar Aliev - the father of the present president of Azerbaijan, and that the former, before becoming a president of Azerbaijan was the head of the KGB in USSR - the most humanistic organization ever! Is sounds like a joke but the truth is that a foundation named after a communist monster sponsors an event to promote the tolerance of Azerbaijan and the chief of UNESCO, Irina Bokova gladly accepts such sponsorship???

What a world we live in!
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#341407 silversmiths of Kayseri who created beautiful silver covers for Armeni

Posted by MosJan on 15 July 2017 - 11:29 AM

Learn about the Armenian silversmiths of Kayseri who created beautiful silver covers for Armenian manuscripts. Three of these covers are in the collection of the Morgan Library & Museum in New York.


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#340809 The World according to ancient Rome

Posted by gamavor on 11 April 2017 - 02:24 AM

https://scontent.fso...f7a&oe=598A20E1
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#340200 Բեխալաթ

Posted by Yervant1 on 03 January 2017 - 02:45 PM

I think, it means mistake or a flaw and the բեխալատ would be the opposite of flaw, I mean flawless. I'm just going with the sentence structure and the Arabic word Khalat means mistake or a flaw, maybe that's where the origin is.

I hope this helps.

I believe the babies flaw is not falling sleep. The last sentence which says that you have one flaw, you don't sleep and stay awake. 


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#339824 Autumn of my Homeland

Posted by onjig on 13 October 2016 - 11:57 AM


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#337201 Armenia develops water-saving innovative fertilizer

Posted by gamavor on 12 January 2016 - 10:44 AM

http://news.am/eng/news/305729.html

YEREVAN. A new fertilizer has been developed in Armenia, and to save water.

Director of Eco Technology company, Ashot Baghdasaryan, told Armenian News-NEWS.am that the granules of this fertilizer collect the water from the soil, and return it to the plant when and as needed.

And the granules of our fertilizer not only accumulate water, but also the useful nutrients, Baghdasaryan explained.

In addition, this fertilizer eliminates excess water, so that the roots of the plants do not decay.

As per the company manager, this fertilizer helps to increase crop yields by 40 to 60 percent.

Furthermore, this material biologically decomposes, and therefore it leaves no residues in the soil.

The fertilizer, which is called Aquasource, underwent several tests among volunteer farmers.

Also, it is tested with a number of international projects.

Ashot Baghdasaryan said Iran, Russia, the US, India, the United Arab Emirates, and even in distant South Africa and Namibia are interested in this new fertilizer.
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#337198 Do you trust Russia or the United States more and why?

Posted by Yervant1 on 11 January 2016 - 01:27 PM

The chances that Russia will help us to free Western Armenia is as much as the help that we will get from the rest of the world, which is zero. We should rely on ourselves only.


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#301582 Repat Armenia

Posted by Nané on 28 January 2013 - 12:35 PM


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#344396 Viva Hayastan:)

Posted by gamavor on 04 March 2019 - 02:13 PM


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