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Favorite Classical Pieces


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#21 Anoushik

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Posted 01 January 2005 - 05:20 PM

QUOTE (Sasun @ Jan 1 2005, 09:45 AM)
Anoushik and Armat, after being only a little exposed to Glen Gould's Bach performances I have a question: don't you guys think that he puts too much of his individual understanding/feeling? I am not at all sure that Bach meant many of the things that Gould is doing to his works.

Well, Glenn Gould's performance is definitely controversial and no other pianist should try to imitate him. The reason it's acceptable for Glenn Gould to interpret Bach's music the way he does is because he does it so well. His performance is not unique because it's aesthetic but because it's so well thought out and philosophical. There are other great pianist that play Bach - Andras Schiff and Angela Hewitt are my favorites - and they play Bach very beautifully and tastefully, but their performance doesn't resemble the performance of someone that's asking the univesal question of who we are, what are we doing here, where are we going, what's our purpose, especially after listening to Glenn Gould. Of course, this is only my own interpretation of Glenn Gould.

Needless to say, there has been sometimes when I've really not accepted some of Glenn Gould's playing of Bach. I asked (begged really tongue.gif ) my teacher to let me work on Prelude and Fugue in B minor from Well-Tempered Clavier Book 1 this coming semester and a week ago I accidentally listened to Glenn Gould's performance of that. I had a complete different interpretation in mind of that beautiful, thought-provoking piece.

#22 spectra

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Posted 02 January 2005 - 01:24 AM

Hullo,

Anoushik, Sona told me that you post in hyeforum smile.gif

I love Johan Sebastian Bach, and his [Christianity] related music. Currently I enjoy his Choral Prelude in F minor, BWV 639; Ich ruf zu dir, Herr Jesu Christ (I call out you, Jesus Christ).

I heard this piece of music in movie Solaris (1972) by Andrei Tarkovsky. The movie is about love and respect. In that movie Tarkovsky shows that in 21st century people will not respect and love each other, and later when the relationship is gone, they regret.

#23 Anoushik

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Posted 02 January 2005 - 02:43 AM

QUOTE (spectra @ Jan 1 2005, 11:24 PM)
Anoushik, Sona told me that you post in hyeforum smile.gif

How are you? smile.gif

Tell Sona to join Hyeforum wink.gif

#24 Anoushik

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Posted 02 January 2005 - 02:53 AM

QUOTE (gamavor @ Dec 31 2004, 03:19 PM)
Yes Anoushik, of course I meant Bethoven! biggrin.gif  Mozart is my favorite though, but I simly cannot play anything by him except some early menuettes. smile.gif

You still play the piano? Do you practice daily, once in a while, occasionally? smile.gif Do you play jazz? I'd love to play jazz but I'm not familiar with the jazz chords.

#25 Sasun

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Posted 02 January 2005 - 06:48 PM

QUOTE (anoushik @ Jan 1 2005, 06:20 PM)
Well, Glenn Gould's performance is definitely controversial and no other pianist should try to imitate him. The reason it's acceptable for Glenn Gould to interpret Bach's music the way he does is because he does it so well. His performance is not unique because it's aesthetic but because it's so well thought out and philosophical. There are other great pianist that play Bach - Andras Schiff and Angela Hewitt are my favorites - and they play Bach very beautifully and tastefully, but their performance doesn't resemble the performance of someone that's asking the univesal question of who we are, what are we doing here, where are we going, what's our purpose, especially after listening to Glenn Gould. Of course, this is only my own interpretation of Glenn Gould.

Needless to say, there has been sometimes when I've really not accepted some of Glenn Gould's playing of Bach. I asked (begged really tongue.gif ) my teacher to let me work on Prelude and Fugue in B minor from Well-Tempered Clavier Book 1 this coming semester and a week ago I accidentally listened to Glenn Gould's performance of that. I had a complete different interpretation in mind of that beautiful, thought-provoking piece.

Anoushik, thank you for the explanation. Maybe if I listened Glen Gould long enough I will start appreciating his interpretation. Maybe it is because of habit and attachment that I can't listen to his performances of Bach. To me, a layman in classical music, some parts of his interpretation sometimes seems outright wrong. But perhaps I must be more openminded, I will give him a try again. I certainly want to be more familiar with somebody's work who asks the same question that I do wink.gif

P.S. Why do you have to ask your te4cher to be able to work on something that you wish? Can't you just work without your teachers approval?

#26 Anoushik

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Posted 02 January 2005 - 08:23 PM

QUOTE (Sasun @ Jan 2 2005, 04:48 PM)
P.S. Why do you have to ask your te4cher to be able to work on something that you wish? Can't you just work without your teachers approval?

You clearly don't know music teachers biggrin.gif

Sasun, my teacher is not only a private teacher that I take lessons from; she is a professor at the university where I'm earning my degree and every performance major has to take the required lessons from the university faculty and at the end of the semester perform in the required jury performance. The jury consists of the faculty (in my case piano faculty, which last time was 10 people in the room scared.gif Scary tongue.gif ) . Of course every teacher wants to give her students pieces that she thinks the student will excell in, and even though they teach at the university level and the students are relatively advanced and know what they can handle the teachers still want to be in charge. Now... when I said you don't know music teachers I meant that the teachers can be very stubborn smile.gif Also, they tend to give the students pieces that they know very well because they've performed it numerous times before and they don't want to take the trouble to research and study unknown pieces with their students. I think that's what happened with me. I'm sad to say that just by the look of my teacher when I told her I wanted to study that Prelude and Fugue it occured to me that she doesn't know this piece and that's why she didn't want to give it to me wink.gif

#27 Anoushik

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Posted 02 January 2005 - 08:33 PM

I forgot to add that the Prelude and Fugue in B minor is very complicated and not many students play four-voiced fugues, at least not as undergraduates smile.gif

#28 Sasun

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Posted 02 January 2005 - 08:42 PM

Anoushik, you are right I don't know anything about music teachers. I have been exposed to one teacher only shortly. When I was a kid I went to a guitar class one day. The teacher gave me a book full of notes and the history of music and other very uninteresting things, and asked me to learn and come back to the next class. I didn't go to the next class, that was it for me unfortunately smile.gif.

So I understand you can't learn without a teacher. But maybe you can, why not try if you really want to learn that work? smile.gif For fun and for your own satisfaction. Or is it really impossible?

#29 Anoushik

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Posted 02 January 2005 - 08:50 PM

Oh no I'm learning it smile.gif She told me that if I come back after the break and it sounds good she'll consider it tongue.gif Classes start next week (Jan. 10) and so far I haven't done much sad.gif I have to practice long hours next week to at least have the notes fully learned (the fugue is six pages and I'm a horrible procrastinator)biggrin.gif I'm sure she won't be pleased that I haven't done much over the break but I'm just as stubborn as her and I'll make sure that I'll play that fugue in the next jury tongue.gif

#30 Anoushik

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Posted 02 January 2005 - 08:53 PM

QUOTE (Sasun @ Jan 2 2005, 06:42 PM)
When I was a kid I went to a guitar class one day. The teacher gave me a book full of notes and the history of music and other very uninteresting things, and asked me to learn and come back to the next class. I didn't go to the next class, that was it for me unfortunately smile.gif

Yeah, it's important that the teacher doesn't overwhelm the young beginner (or old) but encourages him to be interested in music by talking about music rather than asking for you to go home and read about it.

#31 DominO

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Posted 03 January 2005 - 04:26 PM

QUOTE (anoushik @ Dec 30 2004, 01:42 AM)
Hello all smile.gif

What is your favorite Classical piece/composition? Even if you don't have any favorite what do you like to listen to most? This includes any genre, form, (symphonic, chamber, solo instrumental, vocal, choral, even film music that's now considered to be classical, etc). Thanks!

My absolute favorite is J.S. Bach's Chaconne from Partita No. 2 for solo violin.


Bach is not classic, it's Baroc. biggrin.gif OK, OK, I'm making myself look like a total @ss. Beside my musics, biggrin.gif my favoured ones will be found on the link Azat gave.

#32 vava

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Posted 03 January 2005 - 04:50 PM

My recent favourite are the Impromtus for piano Opus 90 by Schubert. I don't normally like schubert too much, but these pieces are fabulous... smile.gif

#33 Anoushik

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Posted 03 January 2005 - 05:12 PM

QUOTE (Domino @ Jan 3 2005, 02:26 PM)
Bach is not classic, it's Baroc.  biggrin.gif OK, OK, I'm making myself look like a total @ss. Beside my musics,  biggrin.gif  my favoured ones will be found on the link Azat gave.

Oh come on, don't be lazy tongue.gif You don't want to take the time to write your favorites here too? smile.gif


Vava, Schubert and J. S. Bach are my favorite composers. I'm sure you'll like Schubert's piano sonatas too if you liked his impromptus smile.gif

#34 Armen

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Posted 03 January 2005 - 06:25 PM

Edvard Grieg's "Peer Gynt" is my all time favourite.

#35 gamavor

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Posted 03 January 2005 - 07:21 PM

QUOTE (anoushik @ Jan 2 2005, 08:53 AM)
You still play the piano? Do you practice daily, once in a while, occasionally? smile.gif Do you play jazz? I'd love to play jazz but I'm not familiar with the jazz chords.



From time to time and it is very depressing smile.gif I see my fingers are not the same. Jazz, - well never mastered that level. I played Ragtime by Brubeck long time ago.

Anoushik, your are opening an old wound! Please don't! smile.gif

#36 Sasun

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Posted 03 January 2005 - 09:18 PM

QUOTE (Armen @ Jan 3 2005, 07:25 PM)
Edvard Grieg's "Peer Gynt" is my all time favourite.

That's one of my favorites too. For some reason this work sounds so Armenian to me. Does anyone else think that way?

#37 Armen

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Posted 03 January 2005 - 09:28 PM

QUOTE (Sasun @ Jan 3 2005, 09:18 PM)
Does anyone else think that way?


Me. Especially the Solveig's Song.

#38 spectra

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Posted 05 January 2005 - 11:04 PM

Frankly, I think Shubert is quite a boring composer... His music is very simple and not interesting... I feel like I listen to the same thing over and over and over and over...

#39 Armen

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Posted 06 January 2005 - 12:33 AM

QUOTE (spectra @ Jan 5 2005, 11:04 PM)
Frankly, I think Shubert is quite a boring composer... His music is very simple and not interesting... I feel like I listen to the same thing over and over and over and over...


Why would you listen to him THAT often then (I mean over and over and ...)? smile.gif

#40 spectra

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Posted 06 January 2005 - 01:24 AM

QUOTE (Armen @ Jan 6 2005, 12:33 AM)
Why would you listen to him THAT often then (I mean over and over and ...)? smile.gif


I mean when I listen to his music, it feels like I listen to the same thing all the time. =]




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