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BASQUES AND ARMENIANS


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#1 Yervant1

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 11:28 AM

BASQUES AND ARMENIANS

December 26, 2013

The founders of Basque national historiography Esteban de Garibay,
Andres de Posa and Baltasar de Echave considered Armenia as homeland
of Basques. The Armenian origin of Basques was strongly supported by
several prominent researchers, such as Joseph Karst Gaspar Eskolano,
Edward Spencer Dodgson, and Bernardo Estornes Lasa

By the end of 19th century the English lingust Edward Spencer Dodgson
absolutely accidentally made a very interesting discovery. Being
already a well-known basqologist, Dodgson studied Armenian in
Parisian `Ecole Special', in the class of the famous philologist Ogust
Career. The result was highly unexpected: already after 2 months
studies, Dodgson noticed that many Armenian and Basque words are
practically identical. Dodgson published an article `Basque words in
Armenian' in the journal `Euskera' (`Basque language'), in 1884. The
list mentioned the parallels between more than fifty words. It was
like thunder in the clear sky for the scientists, who long maintained
the hypothesis of Georgian origin of Basques.

For example, (with transcriptions) BS- char «bad, evil» - ARM. char
«bad, evil», BS. anti «from there» - ARM. anti «from there», BS. ais
«wind» -ARM. ais «wind», BS. zati «separate» - ARM. zati «separate»,
BS. tegi «place» - ARM. tegh «place» .....

The second important discovery on this subject was made later. In
1920s Basque philologist Bernardo Estornes Lasa, a prominent scientist
and academician, was collecting Basque folklore items in Rapcal
valley, in the eastern part of province Navarra. In the village Isaba,
Estornes Lasa wrote down a local legend according to which the village
Isaba was founded by the Armenians, the first inhabitants of Navarra
and the ancestors of Basque people.

The legend says that the leader of Basques was called Haytor who
arrived from Armenia with his seven sons and in their honour founded
seven settlements in Navarra. It also said that the ancestor of
Basques knew the secret of processing metal. Later, an ancient
manuscript was found in the archives of the village, an ancient
historical chronical, which confirmed the spoken legends. Highly
notable that in Basque language Isaba is translated as `The trace of
ancestors'. Although this can seem absolutely incredible, but the fact
remains the fact, in village Isaba exists a road, which has the name
Erminia (Armenia), in honour of the first colonizers of Navarra.

In Basque language the name of their ancestor Haytor means `Received
from Haya' which correlates to Armenian 'hay tor' (`a Grandson of
Armenian'). Joseph Karst also mentioned this fact. The ancestor of
Armenians, Hayk, indeed, had a grandson, whose name was Pask (in some
Armenian dialects Bask). The first time the possible relationship
between Armenian name Pask and etnoname of Basques was indicated by N.
Marr. It's interesting that the Basque term for thoroughbred
`haytoren seme' means `the son of Haytor'.

All these facts were only the top of iceberg of the greatest secret of
the European civilization. The theory of the Armenian origin of the
oldest people of Europe has its deep roots in the historical
collective memory of Basques and found its reflection in their written
sources. As far back as XVI-XVIIcc., the founders of Basque national
historiography Garibay, Andres de Posa and Baltasar de Echave
considered Armenia the prehomeland (or original homeland) of Basques
and tried to prove this on the basis of Basque-Armenian toponymic
parallels... Araks (the name of a river in Armenia and in the Land of
Basques), Apalar, the mountain in the land of Basques and biblical
Ararat, the symbol of Armenians. Moreover, de Posa insisted that
Basques are from Armenia. He mentioned that the city Taragona meant
`commune of shepherds' and compared it with Armenian Taron, the
ancient form of which is - Tarawna.

A spanish historian of 17th century Gaspar Eskolano, in his book about
the history of Valencia (1610), wrote that after the Worldwide flood
the patriarch Tubal and his people disembarked on the coast of Spain
and they spoke Armenian.

Besides, Gaspar Eskolano described the place, where, according to the
legends, Armenians - the first inhabitants of Spain were buried.
Today, on those locations, mainly in modern Catalonia, churches can be
found, indicating that the they have been considered sacred for
centures.

All this information was defied because the subject wasn't discussed
and made out with the help of Armenian language. When German linguist
Joseph Karst undertook the detailed study of Basque-Armenian
parallels, the hypothesis about Georgian origin of Basques was firmly
motivated. Georgian words in Basque language were obviously
borrowings from Armenian, this was indicated by Basque academician
Bernard Estorence Lasa.

In 1928 Joseph Karst published the results of his studies which caused
resonance in the scientific world. He presented more than 300
Basque-Armenian lexical, phonetic and grammatical similiarites,
including a shared systems of declension, conjugations and others.
Karst came into conclusion that Basque and Armenian languages are two
varieties of one linguistical type, which he named Alarodian. Besides,
Karst handled the ethnography and the anthropology of Basques and
Armenians; new data and proofs shed light on this matter .

In 1993 Armenian centre of Yerevan state university founded
Armenian-Basque international scientific journal `Araks', which is
edited by armenologists and basqologists from different countries of
the world.

Some examples on Armenian - Basque similarities

BS.'elki'(exit)-ARM.'elk'(exit)
BS.'ete'(if)-ARM.'ete'(if)
BS.'jaraunsi'(to inherit)-ARM `jarangel'(to inherit)
BS.'muruncha'(snarl)-ARM.'merenchots'(snarl)
BS.'murtsa'(fist)-ARM.'murts'(fist)
BS.'orma'(wall)-ARM.'vorm'(wall)
BS.'tegi'(place)-ARM.'tegh'(place)
BS.'toil'(weak)-ARM.'tuil'(weak)
BS.'laino'(size,breadth)-ARM.'lain'(broad)
BS.'irurden'(third)-ARM.'erordn'(third)
BS.'astadun'(weighty)-ARM.'hastatun'(strong, steadfast)
BS.'astatu'(to prove)-ARM.'hastatel'(to prove) .

In the Armenian Highlands and in the land of Basques there are
enourmous amounts of toponyms, which sometimes get to the level of
simple repetition, such as

Ashtarak (a town in Armenia) - Astarak (a settlement in south of France).

Goris (a city in southeast Armenia) - Goris (a settlement in Gascony).

Deba (a river in north Armenia) - Deba (a name of a river in Gascony).

Shubria (the ancient name of Sasun province) - Shuberoa (tha name to
Basque province in France).

Araks (a famous river in Armenia) - Arakses (a famous river in Gascony).

Aran (the name of terrain in Armenia) - Aran (Wide-spread toponym in
Gascon-speaking part of Catalonia).

Karkar (area in Western Armenia) - Karkar (famous toponym in Gascony), etc.

Basques call themselves `euskaldun(ak)', which derives from the root
word `eusk', in different dialects it has different forms - eusk, usk,
esku, asketic. The word is etymologically linked with Armenian word
`voski' `gold', with the variations: iski, veske, aske, ioski. The
Armenian word voski `gold' is the root of the proper name `Voskan',
which means `one who owns gold' and it reminds the ethnic name of
Basques `baskon', and in latin sources fixed as `Vaskon'. In Armenian
- Araratyan Kingdom (`Urartian kindom'), the southeastern coast of the
lake Van, which was the crandle of Armenian people, is called
'Khubushkia' which means `valley of usks' that is to say `valley of
gold `. In medieval Armenian sources Khubushkia, `valley of usks' or '
golden valley' was renamed into `Hayots dzor' which means `Armenian
valley'. On the other hand, the Ushkiani mountains are mentioned in
`Urartian' inscriptions on the northeastern coast of lake Urmia. In
the time of Strabo, the Ushkiani mountains were already identified as
`Armenian mountains', but in Armenian sources they are known as
`Voskean' -'golden'.

All these facts allow us to conclude that for our ancestors the
notions `gold-miner' and `Armenian' were synonymous, which is also
evidenced by Basque legends.

In conclusion, there was a genetic study done in different regions of
Armenia, that detected that the characteristic genetic code prevalent
in Welsh, Basques and Irish, called the Atlantic Modal Haplotype, is
also present in Armenian population of Syunik and Artsax. These are
two Armenian provinces predominantly isolated in the mountains, which
precluded genetic admixture with neighboring ethnic groups and
nations». The Armenian modal haplotype is also the modal R1b3
haplotype.

For a proximate examination of European affiliations to Armenians, you
may also refer to a study done by Michael E. Weale, Rolf F. Jager and
Neil Bradman in 2001 called `Armenian Y chromosome haplotypes reveal
strong regional structure within a single ethno-national group,
revealing prevalent link between Welsh, Basques and Irish to the
Armenian populace in Syunik and Karabakh. You may access this study by
contacting:

Departments of Biology and Anthropology,
University College London, University of London,
Darwin Bdg, Gower St, London WC1E 6BT, UK
e-mail: m.weale@ucl.ac.uk,
Tel.: +44-207-4043040, Fax: +44-207-4042081

Another fact: Ireland is an Armenian term, which is derived from the
word Eyre, meaning to burn, he burns and any other variation, and it
was associated with the Celtic God Eyre. You can also see the
similarities between Armenian and Celtic stone carvings, which no
other similarity is present anywhere else in the world. Also, is not a
coincidence that the word Spain, is a Basque-derivative term of
Espanna.

Anyone claiming these are coincidental suppositions are more claims of
an inferiority complex rather than strict examinations of their
unlikely coincidences and due to mere probabilistic terms, a
coincidence is astronomically unlikely. Remember what Robert Ellis, a
British scholar once declared, `Armenian conquests of Europe were
during pre-historic and pre-traditional times.' Think about it...

According to the papers published by Vahan Sargsyan and Vahan Setyan

http://narinnamkn.wo...-and-armenians/
 


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#2 Johannes

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 12:41 PM

In grabar (ancient Armenian language) ՈՍԿԻ- oski.

#3 Johannes

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 12:49 PM

According to google-translation;

Sister- arreba
Brother- anaia
Four- lau
Milk- esnea


Basque language even is not an indoeuropean language.

Ps. I am reading articles about Armenian origin of basque people for more than 6 years.

#4 Arpa

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 02:21 PM

According to google-translation;

Sister- arreba
Brother- anaia
Four- lau
Milk- esnea


Basque language even is not an indoeuropean language.

Ps. I am reading articles about Armenian origin of basque people for more than 6 years.

Yes Dear Ohan
Please forgive mefor being so blunt and graphic..
This whole thing is a whole Toro Kaka, tavar ՏԱՒԱՐ trik ie Bull Shit
How long can we stretch our culture? How about those Armenian Missionaries in Iceland?
http://hyeforum.com/...land#entry52786
https://www.google.c...iw=1026&bih=402
Among many, that we have spoken about this, see this this BS.
http://hyeforum.com/...=1
Can we please clean our language from the effects of dolma and basturma before we proceed to basquerma?

Edited by Arpa, 13 January 2014 - 02:26 PM.


#5 Yervant1

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 02:31 PM

Arpa it's not as far fetched as you might think, look at it in the span of thousands of years and not hundreds. Just look at Armenians in North America within 150 years  you'll see so much change, imagine them in 1500 years and you will see no traces of their Armenian roots left in them and yet they will have Armenian ancestry. 



#6 Arpa

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Posted 16 January 2014 - 01:56 PM

Dear Yervant. It is not only farfetched, it is also long stretched, քաշքշոուած.
---
At the risk of me being shot, let us , once and for all get to the bottom of this nonsensical thing.
http://en.wikipedia....Basque_language
ՄԵՆՔ ՄԵԶԻ ՀԱՐՍ ԵՆՔ ԼԻՆՈՒՄ, ԻՍԿ ԲԱՍԿԱ ՓԵՍԱՆ ՈՒՐ՞ Է::
To quote from Anush.
Էս ինչ տեսակ հարսանիք է, ոչ հարս ունինք, ոչ փեսայ
Please show us where the A word appears, or any reference to Armeno=Basque connection. Are we such a helpless basket/basquet case?****
Some discredited pseudo linguists have attempted to connect the Basque language to the Caucasus, among others Chechen etc. The closest is the Georgian/Kartvelian , since their country was known as Iberia/Iveria, Virq/Vrastan. This is also debunked.
We will wait to see .NOT!!! When mehmet osmanoghlu finds a connection to basturma, basquerma- furkish.

Georgian: Linking Basque to Kartvelian languages is now widely discredited. The hypothesis was inspired by the existence of the ancient Kingdom of Iberia in the Caucasus and further by some typological similarities between the two languages.[9] According to J.P. Mallory, in his 1989 book In Search of the Indo-Europeans, the hypothesis was also inspired by a Basque place-name ending in - dze. Northeast Caucasian languages, such as Chechen, are seen by the French linguist Michel Morvan as more likely candidates for a very distant connection.[10]
Today, it is most commonly referred to as el vasco, la lengua vasca or el euskera. Both terms, vasco and basque, are inherited from Latin ethnonym Vascones which in turn goes back to the Greek term ??as?????? (ouaskonous), an ethnonym used by Strabo in his Geographica (23 CE, Book III).[4]

We are already familiar with the phenomenon of interchangeability of B and V and visa versa. See Bahram(bagram) and Vahram. Basque/Basco v Vasco.
Was Vasco (Vasken) da Gama a (Portuguese)Basque? Some say so.
http://en.wikipedia....i/Vasco_da_Gama
Why are w stopping here/ Let us show the world that Gengiz Khan Mongolian was an Armenian, his real name was Khanlian, ***or Timur Lang Lentimur the lame/kagh,topal was an Armenian, his real surname was topaloghluan-. :goof:: **
Our next project will be to find the connection to Franz Joseph HAYdn and Hohannes Sebastatsi Bachian.
http://en.wikipedia....ki/Joseph_Haydn
http://en.wikipedia...._Sebastian_Bach
Not to forget Herbert Von Kara((J)yan..
Remember that Julius Caesar was from Caesaria also known as Kesaria/Mazhak /Kaisrri/Կեսարիա, where Grigor Pahlav and his buddy- buddies were.
** http://www.bbc.co.uk...gazine-20538810
***You think Im kidding? Google Khanlian/Khanlarian and see, to not forget Yeprem Khan..****
**** http://en.wikipedia....iki/Yeprem_Khan
http://www.badanegan...ni-yerke--.html

**** Basket case is from when one would be so handicapped that they would be carried in a basket.
http://www.thefreedi...com/basket case
basket case
n.
1. Slang One that is in a completely hopeless or useless condition: "He immediately becomes a psychological basket case, embittered to the point of craziness" (New York). "After World War I, when the Hapsburg empire was split up, little Austria seemed a basket case" (Paul A. Samuelson).
2. Offensive Slang A person, especially a soldier, who has had all four limbs amputated.
Our Living Language In popular usage basket case refers to someone in a hopeless mental condition, but in origin it had a physical meaning. In the grim slang of the British army during World War I, it referred to a quadruple amputee. This is one of several expressions that first became popular in World War I, or that entered American army slang from British English at that time.

#7 Arpa

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Posted 16 January 2014 - 03:03 PM

Do our so called self appointed linguists have anything better to do than building sand castles in Barcelona and Basque-lona? Or our Don Quixote-s chasing windmills in the desert.

Edited by Arpa, 16 January 2014 - 03:17 PM.


#8 Johannes

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Posted 17 January 2014 - 04:16 PM

BASQUES AND ARMENIANS
December 26, 2013
For example, (with transcriptions) BS- char «bad, evil» - ARM. char
«bad, evil», BS. anti «from there» - ARM. anti «from there», BS. ais
«wind» -ARM. ais «wind», BS. zati «separate» - ARM. zati «separate»,
BS. tegi «place» - ARM. tegh «place» .....

In ancient Armenian the word ՏԵՂ spelled "tel". Only in Armenian and after ages the word spelled "tegh".
http://www.nayiri.co...pageNumber=2422
ՏԵՂ- բնիկ հայ բառ հնխ. սեդլո- ձեւից...

#9 hagopn

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 11:41 PM

Yervant, I agree with you 100%. 

 

Armenians have similar behavior to the Monkeys In The Cage And The Banana when it concerns their history, their pride, their contributions to civilization as a whole.

 

See the Monkey/Banana experiment here http://i.snag.gy/kdu77.jpg

 

The story goes as such:  Once upon a time, there was this truly resourceful but sedentary bunch who escaped the Ice Age, became more populous than their fellow cold weather Cro Magnonite/Neanderthalistic (mostly bone fraggy concoction bullshit - they were exactly as we were up to 100000s of years ago probably) brethren, and decided to setup shop as Neolithic agrarians.

 

One advancement after another came such as control of fire, domestication of animals, etc., particularly the Dog, the animal which afforded these folks the ability to sleep at night and work during the day, that guardian against the dark dangers, that very animal which was buried with its master to "guide him safely to the Otherworld" beyond the grave.  Indeed, Armenia saw this first, the burial of the Dog with its Master, a likely critical catalyst for the advancement of agrarian/sedentary life.  

 

This advancement resulted in a population boom, which in turn brought these folks in the Armenian Highlands (no Ice Age happened here around 13000 years ago, apparently) to an overpopulation crossroads circa 7th to 5th millennium b.c.  Naturally, these folks, our ancestors, decided to emigrate and claim new settlements outside their original neolithic and Bronze Age homeland.

 

Let's be satisfied with this proto-historic theorem for now.

 

The interesting part of this tale is that possibly the north-west of the Balkan Peninsula is also another such "spoke" of the neolithic agrarian wheel, something that the author mentioned above, Robert Ellis, covers in his book THE ARMENIAN ORIGINS OF THE ETRUSCANS.  With good reason, Ellis, among others, thought the Illyrians (and the Pelasgians, i.e. pre-Homeric pre-Hellenic residents of Greece, etc.) to have been also of  the same "Thraco-Phrygian race of which Armenian is the last living remnant." 

 

I am sure that the title THE ARMENIAN ORIGINS OF THE ETRUSCANS must be a severe eyesore, indeed a log in the eye for the Trained Monkeys who surely will mock any mention of connections of distant cultures, ancient ones, with Armenians.

 

As to the Indo-European argument.  Please.  Armenian has only about 10% affinity with the IE lexicon.  Ajarian is ancient and half-meaningful history.


Edited by hagopn, 23 January 2014 - 11:56 PM.


#10 Arpa

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 10:07 AM

Very persuasive argument.
I have a question. Do we know when this colonization happened? I dont know, I cannot find it. Was it before or after the Mashtotsian era? If the latter, then why don't the Basque write in the Mesropian Ayb-ou-Ben? If it was before that era, then they would be writing like this, in goat-script, Capra-script այծեգիր/aytsegir?** Does that mean Written by a Goat?
https://www.facebook...62195732&type=3
:goof: As to the monkeys and bananas. Which monkey am I? The one up the stairs or the ones doused with cold water? :jester:
Above all. What is the moral of this story about the Armeno- Basque connection? Is it like the Basque, and by association the Spanish, and further, the Spanish and the Europeans were a bunch of Neanderthal savages before we taught them civilization.
If we had such an advanced civilization to spread it all the way from Ispania and Iceland, then why did we not have a written language until 4 thousand years after the Sumero-Assero-Greco scripts.
https://www.facebook...62195732&type=3
http://www.cilicia.c...cm/DCP_6209.JPG
**What is th origin of the Italian surname Capra (nanny [female] goat), and the Island of Capri?
See etymology http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capri
To not forget Այծեամ Անեցի/ Aytsyam and Այծեմնիկ/Aytsemnik
http://hyeforum.com/...=1

Edited by Arpa, 24 January 2014 - 10:09 AM.


#11 Yervant1

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 10:57 AM

Arpa it's not the author of this article who is saying this, but these historians who are Basque and I quote from the article"The founders of Basque national historiography Esteban de Garibay, Andres de Posa and Baltasar de Echave considered Armenia as homeland of Basques. The Armenian origin of Basques was strongly supported by several prominent researchers, such as Joseph Karst Gaspar Eskolano, Edward Spencer Dodgson, and Bernardo Estornes Lasa." 
 Arpa I don't get your opposition to this, when other races create BS out of thin air and introduce it as fact, while here, there are tons of linguistic proof that Basque use words that have Armenian roots. As for the alphabet issue, I'm assuming that the migration happened well ahead of the creation of the Armenian alphabet.



#12 Johannes

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 11:06 AM

Hagopn,
Հնդեւրոպական հայերէնէն այդ տասն առ հարիւրը պահուեր, մնացեալը մոռցուեր է:
Տասը տոկոսին մէջ է- ընտանիքի, թիւի, կեանքի հիմնական իմաստները նշող անունները:
Լեզուի շաղախն է:

#13 hagopn

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 12:12 PM

Writing system, you say?  Who said we did not have symbolism and hieroglyphics?  We in fact did.  There are theories around the tarot symbology, the rock carvings. etc..  We even borrowed (back) the cuneiform base, which is likely also rooted in Armenian symbology exemplified in rock carvings.   This is fact, unless you are still of the Trained Monkey persuasion who still think that "Urartu" (probable intentional mis-pronunciation) is not an ARmenian dynastic phase.  Artak Movsesyan did a job in collecting the as of yet sporadic thoughts, sporadic entirely due to the Trained Monkey syndrome, on these probable writings systems that we have always had.  Each era afforded and required its own level of literacy. 

 

Older writing systems were merely symbolic and were meant to be cryptic to the non-initiated, so the mythologers say, so why expect an alphabet for a people who didn't see the need for it?  Is it not true that the priestly caste of the Celts, for example, were in fact discouraged from depending on their runic systems and were instead required to memorize their myths, legends, hymns and prayers? 

 

THe principal reason why the first organized writing system that yielded a semi-literate society came to be developed is accounting, the greatest driving force having been usury most likely, and the Sumerian scribe was a highly trained hatchet man whose primary occupation seems to have been initially to serve the temple, but later gradually more so the merchant/usurer.  THe tablet records are overwhelmingly commercial/financial in nature for this reason.  Ceasar's exploits into Gaul reveals his admiration of the Celts, the Druids in particular, who had sharper minds due to their illiteracy and committment to memory of huge amounts of information.  Don't forget the phenomenon of the Literate Dolt.  Literacy has its benefits, but also its fallacies.

 

THe so-called literacy argument is null and void, without depth, without substance.  It always has been, but we, as Trained Monkeys, have been taught not to venture into "risky territory," lest we be compared to the clownish culture called pan-turkism for whom even the Australian Aborigine is a lost Altaic tribe.  ARmenians make no such claims!  Armenians simple state the obvious: We are ancient, and we have been emigrating due to the forces of nature (as mentioned above) in the beginning and due to the unnatural forces of Imperialist politics in later stages.

 

As I said: We are trained monkeys. 

 

On the domestic front, our principal "trainer" has been the Church, ironically, who has taught us and continues to teach us that Armenian civilization began with them despite testimony by the Church's own chronicler, Movses Khorenatsi, that we have indeed had a writing system that predates the Mashtotsian "reorganization" - the actual probable meaning of "horinel".  The Persophiles and Hellenophiles in their turn also have even falsified primary sources in some cases to push forth the argument that ARmenians are 1) migrants, and 2) surely the younger of the cultures than the Persian or Hellenic, which is utter nonsense.

 

Just read Robert Ellis' book without prejudice as a primer as to the record of migration.  Naturally no historic records exist.  Why would a simple agrarian people keep meticulous accounting records of their dealings?  They were at the time living in an era where professional armies (super looting machines) did not yet exist, idea and history thieves were only minor bands of rejects, easily repelled.  THe world was different. 

 

The bulk of Armenian migratory patterns predate history.  Yet, in the post-CHristian era also you see a huge number of migrations to the banks of the Danube due to the Byzantine Faction's actions against the non-CHristian elements in Armenia, a civil war that apparently raged at least from the 6th century a.d. up to the fall of Ani, a time during which the Byzantine Faction was busy in the southwest clamping down on "heretics" while ignoring the influx of the turk vermin in the northeast.  The semi-observant Aristakes Lazdivertstsi attests to this.

 

The language root argument and the Basques: The Basques themselves see a connection!  Yes, of course, they are probably a result of a fusion of native and migrant cultures, hence the distincnt as well as common vocabularies, but truly the Monkeys are trained to ignore the similarities, focus on the (lesser) differences, prove in their minds the disconnections, in order to feel comfort in the illusion that their banana is safe hanging from the ceiling.


Edited by hagopn, 24 January 2014 - 12:25 PM.


#14 hagopn

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 12:36 PM

Hagopn,
Հնդեւրոպական հայերէնէն այդ տասն առ հարիւրը պահուեր, մնացեալը մոռցուեր է:
Տասը տոկոսին մէջ է- ընտանիքի, թիւի, կեանքի հիմնական իմաստները նշող անունները:
Լեզուի շաղախն է:

 

The assumption that we forgot much of the IE vocabulary is merely an assumption with absolutely not a shred of proof.  And the pronouns, numericals and ordinals, grammar and structural base, these in no way disprove a huge Armenian influence on the Iberian Peninsula.  It is likely that the Basque connection predates the full development of the IE system, or it proves that the Armenian migrants fused with an already developed culture that resulted in the Basque civilization.


Edited by hagopn, 24 January 2014 - 12:38 PM.


#15 Johannes

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 12:53 PM

http://www.nayiri.com/imagedDictionaryBrowser.jsp?dictionaryId=7&query=Աջ

http://www.nayiri.co...&pageNumber=251

The word աջ indoeuropean-Armenian
While ձախ...
http://www.nayiri.com/imagedDictionaryBrowser.jsp?dictionaryId=7&query=ձախ

#16 hagopn

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 01:01 PM

Explain more. 



#17 Johannes

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 01:01 PM

Աջը պահեր, ձախը մոռցեր են:
Կարմիրի համար, բնիկ հայ-հնդեւրոպական բառի մասին, կըսէ Աճառեան, մոռցուելով– իրանեան բառը գործածութեան դրուեր է:

#18 Johannes

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 01:02 PM

Dzakh is not indoeuropean word, adj is.
In the same language; the word right is indoeuropean, while the word left is unidentified.

Edited by Johannes, 24 January 2014 - 01:08 PM.


#19 hagopn

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 01:03 PM

Nakh, Ajov yev Saahdyo-ov inch chen hamozadz yerpek.  Yev darper IE lezuneru mech ajn u dzakh@ darper tzeverov gan.  Animast vej, yev voch meg tzevov abatsuyuts che.  Zud yentratrank.


Edited by hagopn, 24 January 2014 - 01:05 PM.


#20 Johannes

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 01:11 PM

Nakh, Ajov yev Saahdyo-ov inch chen hamozadz yerpek.  Yev darper IE lezuneru mech ajn u dzakh@ darper tzeverov gan.  Animast vej, yev voch meg tzevov abatsuyuts che.  Zud yentratrank.

Ok,




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