Jump to content


Photo

Monte Melkonian


  • Please log in to reply
57 replies to this topic

#21 espanol

espanol

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 13 posts

Posted 15 March 2004 - 02:10 PM

Photos

Attached Files



#22 espanol

espanol

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 13 posts

Posted 15 March 2004 - 02:11 PM

monument in yerevan

Attached Files



#23 Armen

Armen

    Veterinarian

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,456 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Yerevan

Posted 17 March 2005 - 11:23 PM

My Brothers road

By Markar Melkonian

http://www.mybrothersroad.com/

#24 MosJan

MosJan

    Էլի ԼաՎա

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 27,871 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:My Little Armenia

Posted 18 March 2005 - 12:48 AM

Armen Shnorhakal em

Amsi 9in Pasadena en yeghel iyso rel Glandale sad.gif

apsos

#25 Armen

Armen

    Veterinarian

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,456 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Yerevan

Posted 18 March 2005 - 12:14 PM

Times London Weekend Supplement

March 12, 2005

Road to revolution

PhD? I'd rather be a terrorist
by Philip Marsden


From Berkeley graduate to Armenian freedom fighter is a small step when history is on your side

I was too late. He was already dead. It was the summer of 1993 and I had come to the Armenian front line to interview Monte Melkonian. But a week or so earlier he had been caught in a skirmish near Agdam and died instantly from a shrapnel wound. At his headquarters, his men were in shock. In the canteen I sat down next to his aide. "Not there," he said reverently, "that was Monte's place."

During the previous four years Melkonian had become a legendary commander in the Armenians' post-Soviet war with the Azeris. What interested me about him was that, unlike the 4,000 fighters he commanded, he had not lived for 70 years under Soviet rule. He was from California, a third-generation Armenian, brought up in the most liberal state in the Union.

In recent years our idea of political radicalism has been overshadowed by the chilling logic of the suicide bomber. Even with the changes in the Middle East, it is unlikely that the divisions and destitution that breed such extremism will disappear overnight. Disenfranchised in Iraq's Sunni triangle or imprisoned in the hellish slums of Gaza, those who strap explosives to their bodies or drive a four-wheel bomb into a crowd have, by definition, nothing on this earth left to lose but their lives.

But there have always been other radicals, those who do have a choice, who are fewer in number but of much greater influence - those who throw away privilege or a good education for the life of political outlaw. Che Guevara swapped medical training for peasant-based revolution and died for it. The maverick Marxist Carlos the Jackal was born into a wealthy Venezuelan family but became an effective KGB-trained killer. George Habash passed out top of his class in paediatric medicine, but went underground to set up the guerrilla group PFLP (Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine). And how different the world would look if Osama bin Laden, with a degree in civil engineering, had accepted a steady job in the family's property empire.

Monte Melkonian, too, had had professional options. In the late 1970s he graduated from Berkeley. He was a brilliant pupil who spoke several languages. His thesis on Urartian rock-tombs attracted the attention of Oxford University's archaeology department and earned him a place there to do his PhD. Instead he jumped on a plane for the Middle East. There began a 15-year odyssey that ended, cheek-down, on a dusty road in Armenian-occupied Azerbaijan.

Melkonian's career also reveals the profound shift in radical ideology - from revolutionary Marxism to nationalism, from the invocation of class struggle to the invocation of history or God. Like post-modernists everywhere, freedom fighters have rediscovered the power of tradition.

In My Brother's Road, Melkonian's elder sibling charts Monte's bloody passage through this period. He began as an agitator, organising strikes in Iran to help to topple the Shah. He then travelled north to Iranian Kurdistan and witnessed the disciplined Kurdish peshmerga rebels. But it was in the large Armenian quarter of Beirut that his involvement began to shift away from internationalism: in the free-for-all of the Lebanese civil war he first took up arms to defend his fellow Armenians.

I first heard about Melkonian in Beirut in the winter of 1991. The stories of his years there in the late 1970s seemed redolent of that era, a time of flared hipsters, radical chic, Patti Hearst and the Baader-Meinhof Gang. Gradually, Melkonian was being pulled towards a more particular cause, the one that haunts all Armenians. In 1915 decades of persecution had ended with the entire Armenian population of eastern Turkey being deported or murdered. More than a million died. Many of Melkonian's family were refugees from this time. It was a wound that did not heal with the passing years. In fact, faced by Turkish denial that it happened at all, resentment grew more intense.

During the 1980s, living the life of a tramp guerrilla, Melkonian wrote many articles and monographs. In these you can sense his ideology coming into conflict with a growing nationalism. With ever greater difficulty, he squeezed the Armenian question into the context of left-wing orthodoxy, believing for instance that Armenia's independence from the Soviet Union would be a terrible error.

Meanwhile, amid the anarchy of warring Lebanon, Melkonian's actions grew increasingly militant. He learnt to use aliases, false passports and a spectacular range of weapons. He crossed the path of Abu Nidal and Black September. He attended the joint training camps of the Bekaa Valley where the region's dispossessed - Kurds, Palestinians and Armenians - wriggled under barbed wire and dreamt of killing Turks and Israelis. In time Melkonian became involved with the vicious Armenian terrorist group ASALA (Armenian Secret Army for the Liberation of Armenia). He set off a bomb in Milan. In Athens he leant into the car of a Turkish diplomat and shot him and, by mistake, his 14-year-old daughter (this was to become his greatest regret). He trained the Armenians who occupied the Turkish Embassy in Paris.

In the late 1980s, the Soviet Union was collapsing and the Armenians and Azeris of the south Caucasus were unpacking decades of mutual animosity. War was breaking out over the mountainous region of Artsax and Melkonian travelled to Soviet Armenia for the first time. There he was confronted with the reality of failed socialism. In the mountains, Armenian villagers took up hunting rifles to defend their homes and attack their Azeri neighbours. By the end of 1991, the hunting rifles were being replaced with heavier weapons as a full-scale war erupted, the first in a pattern of post-Soviet wars in the Caucasus and the Balkans.

Melkonian found his guerrilla training invaluable. In lecturing his fighters on the wider context of the fighting he turned not to ideology but to history. "Lose Artsax," he said, "and you will be turning the last page of Armenian history." He feared that, squeezed between Turkey and Turkic Azerbaijan, Armenians would be driven from their last pieces of territory and the work of 1915 would be completed.

His drawing on the grievances of the past was finding echoes throughout the old Soviet bloc and in the Middle East. In the north Caucasus in the 1990s, the Chechen leader Dzhokhar Dudayev was stirring his people with talk of the "300-year war with the Russians", a war that began when Peter the Great landed in Dagestan in the 18th century. Milosevic had already woken the Serbs by invoking the Battle of Kosovo Polje 600 years earlier.

More recently, bin Laden has talked of the Crusades as having never ended while in Israel the old Zionism of kibbutzes and secularism has been eclipsed by the militant Jewish settlers of the West Bank. They, too, have a loss to correct, referring to the lands of Israel and Judah in the Time of the Kings, a full 3,000 years ago.

My Brother's Road; An American's Fateful Journey to Armenia by Markar Melkonian

#26 Nazarian

Nazarian

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 146 posts
  • Location:USA

Posted 18 March 2005 - 02:05 PM

'They' may call him a terrorist but he was a great hero of the our nation.

#27 Armen

Armen

    Veterinarian

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,456 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Yerevan

Posted 18 March 2005 - 02:08 PM

QUOTE (Nazarian @ Mar 18 2005, 02:05 PM)
'They' may call him a terrorist but he was a great hero of the our nation.


I don't think that the author was clear about that. I think he wanted to show the rise of nationalism as a whole. While criticising Monte in some cases he was sympathetic of him in others.

#28 kumkap

kumkap

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 86 posts

Posted 22 March 2005 - 05:39 PM

i would just like to say that everyone should stop what they're doing, go to the nearest armenian bookstore and pick up a copy of this book, my brother's road.

there will be a wide variety of responses to this book, as it is written with a remarkable sense of fairness and makes no effort to conceal the rather extensive list of criminal actions monte was directly or indirectly involved in. and yet this story touched me very deeply - i read it almost cover to cover and could not put it down. the depth of feeling that drove him, his attachment to his ancestral roots, and his heroism and selflessness went through my bones, and my imagination has been racing ever since. i am not a particularly religious person but there was a kind of beauty and purity about his soul. at the same time, even though this is an inspiring story in many ways it is also a sad one, because you sense that people like him belong to a bygone era and don't exist anymore (of course, most of the story takes place before there was an independent armenia, so it was quite a different world back then). more and more i feel a kind of despair that this tv/consumer culture (whatever you want to call it) my generation are a product of has somehow beaten out of us the capacity think and feel the way monte did. to the young people growing up in the west nowadays, do names like van, kharpert, sasun, sepastia, gesaria, trabzon, bitlis, mush, dikranagerd, yozgat, kars mean anything anymore? can they even converse casually in the language of their ancestors? monte gave his life for the memory of these places and the survival of our ancient language.

anyway this book is wonderfully written - markar melkonian brings an extremely thorough knowledge of the people and places monte encountered in his life - and does a remarkable job of recreating the imagery of their youth in visalia california and retracing his brother's steps, some of which defy belief.

there are also several surprising revelations in this book, i guess i won't mention them so as not to ruin the suprise. this is an extraordinary book, please encourage as many people as possible to read it.

#29 Armen

Armen

    Veterinarian

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,456 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Yerevan

Posted 22 March 2005 - 05:53 PM

I totally agree with you. Amazing book. Amazing like Monte himself. His brother just had to tell the true story. The difficulty was in finding out the true story. I think he has managed to do that.

There is an national archangel and it drives people like Monte to do what they do. When I imagine the changes that happened in him over his lifetime that brought him to his culmination at Karabagh war ... They are almost unbelievable.

#30 MosJan

MosJan

    Էլի ԼաՎա

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 27,871 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:My Little Armenia

Posted 22 March 2005 - 06:01 PM

QUOTE (kumkap @ Mar 22 2005, 04:39 PM)
i would just like to say that everyone should stop what they're doing, go to the nearest armenian bookstore and pick up a copy of this book, my brother's road. 

there will be a wide variety of responses to this book, as it is written with a remarkable sense of fairness and makes no effort to conceal the rather extensive list of criminal actions monte was directly or indirectly involved in.  and yet this story touched me very deeply - i read it almost cover to cover and could not put it down.  the depth of feeling that drove him, his attachment to his ancestral roots, and his heroism and selflessness went through my bones, and my imagination has been racing ever since.  i am not a particularly religious person but there was a kind of beauty and purity about his soul.  at the same time, even though this is an inspiring story in many ways it is also a sad one, because you sense that people like him belong to a bygone era and don't exist anymore (of course, most of the story takes place before there was an independent armenia, so it was quite a different world back then).  more and more i feel a kind of despair that this tv/consumer culture (whatever you want to call it) my generation are a product of has somehow beaten out of us the capacity think and feel the way monte did.  to the young people growing up in the west nowadays, do names like van, kharpert, sasun, sepastia, gesaria, trabzon, bitlis, mush, dikranagerd, yozgat, kars mean anything anymore?  can they even converse casually in the language of their ancestors?  monte gave his life for the memory of these places and the survival of our ancient language. 

anyway this book is wonderfully written - markar melkonian brings an extremely thorough knowledge of the people and places monte encountered in his life - and does a remarkable job of recreating the imagery of their youth in visalia california and retracing his brother's steps, some of which defy belief. 

there are also several surprising revelations in this book, i guess i won't mention them so as not to ruin the suprise.  this is an extraordinary book, please encourage as many people as possible to read it.



Welcome to HyeForum

i just got the book this afternoon

all i need now is some free time.......

#31 MosJan

MosJan

    Էլի ԼաՎա

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 27,871 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:My Little Armenia

Posted 12 June 2007 - 01:19 AM

On June 12, 1993 Monte Melkonian was killed

[June 11, 2007]

In the early morning the self-defense forces of the Martuni region of Nagorno Karabakh began an operation to destroy the military strongholds in the villages of the Aghdam region of Azerbaijan. Everything was going as planned. By noon the operation was over. Monte, Komitas, Saribek, Saro, Hovik, and Gevork entered the Marzili village riding in a Vilis. After examining the territory they were to determine the new positions. When they were approaching a crossroads they noticed an armored vehicle and stopped the Vilis. At a distance of 40 meters a group of soldiers gathered around the vehicle. Komitas, who was wearing an Azerbaijani military uniform, got out of the car and walked towards them. He called to them, “Are you Armenians?” They answered “No” in Azerbaijani. Komitas would later say that the moment he asked the question he knew they were enemy soldiers. He opened fire and retreated. The others jumped out the car and took positions, firing.

The vehicle's large-caliber machine-gun joined the enemy's submachine gunners. During the first burst of gunfire, the men were lying on the ground. Monte rushed towards the wall of the nearest house. The second machine-gun burst resounded. It hit the wall… A large fragment of a shell pierced Monte's head. Four of the men were already wounded. Holding Monte, Hovik called for help over the radio transmitter - 00 is shot, 00 is no more… They took position around their commander and continued to resist. The relief forces destroyed the Azerbaijani detachment, and took a prisoner. The reconnaissance chief, Saribek Martirosyan, was bleeding profusely and died as soon as they reached the hospital.

See also: @ Hetq.com

Ten years ago, Monte Melkonian was killed

Small Town Kid

Monte Melkonian: hero, intellectual, leader, friend

#32 MosJan

MosJan

    Էլի ԼաՎա

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 27,871 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:My Little Armenia

Posted 12 June 2007 - 01:21 AM




There's No Country Or Court That Has The Right To Judge Our Struggle

[June 11, 2007]

In 1985 Monte was in France. The police didn't know this. Levon Minasian, one of the leaders of the "Armenian National Movement" had been arrested. Monte had come to France to testify on his behalf. Since Monte was barred from entering France his friends negotiated a secret deposition. The investigative magistrage was taken hostage in order for Monte to submit his testimony without reveling his location. Monte testified but his entry into France was thus revealed.

"On Thursday, November 28, police from the French Counter-Intelligence Agency (DST) arrested Monte Melkonian, the head of the A.S.A.L.A.-Revolutionary Movement. Also arrested was Benjamin Keshishian, a staffer at the Hay Baykar newspaper, who was meeting Melkonian for a press interview. That same evening a young French-Armenian woman, Zepyur Kasbarian, was also taken into custody. The French police stated that a gun belonging to Melkonian, some electronic equipment, a photo of the Turkish ambassador, and a list of Turkish ships anchored in Marseille harbor were all found in her apartment. Zepyur denied any prior knowledge of these items as well as knowing Monte's true identity. All three were charged with "criminal conspiracy".

Hay Baykar, December 20, 1985

At the time, local Armenian activists were subjected to increased police surveillance. Monte had found himself on the streets of Paris with no money and no place to stay. Zepyur Kasbarian, a student and Armenian language teacher, took him in.

- Zepyur, what were you accused of?

- As a conspirator since they found all those items of Monte's in my apartment.

- How did Monte act during the trial?

- Always in good spirits. He spoke at length. I wasn't the one on trial. It was Monte they were after. My name was mentioned only in passing.

- How long were you in jail?

- Exactly one year. It's now been ten years since my release. But I've suffered more during these past ten years than during the one I spent in jail. I never expected to be barred from freely moving about in Paris all that time. I'm under virtual house arrest. I haven't seen Monte since then, but I'm glad to have helped out such a good and great man. I'm proud to have done what I did – no regrets. Unfortunately, I didn't have the chance to ask him how the police knew he was staying at my place.

- In other words, were the police tipped-off to the fact he was there?

- Of course they knew. How else did they take him into custody at 11 A.M? Later that day they came to my apartment and showed me a photo of Monte from one of the newspapers. They asked if I knew who the person was and I said, yes, he's Monte Melkonian. Then they showed me a photo of Monte while staying at my apartment and I said, No, I don't know this person. Neither did I know who my interrogator was nor why he was asking all these questions.

Much later, in his book Self-Criticism , Monte writes, "There are several reasons why they were able to capture me. First, they knew my whereabouts because I testified. It occurred at a time when I didn't have many resources at my disposal and was vulnerable. I also made the huge blunder of using the telephone carelessly. In the end it was this crucial error in judgment that did me in."

Monte spent a total of three days at Zepyur's apartment and on the fourth he was taken into custody while in the Zever Cafe. Zepyur's husband, Varoujan Mehrap, took this writer to the cafe where he met Fake Claude, a waiter there for over forty years, who was an eyewitness to Monte's arrest and vividly remembers that day:

"It happened on a Friday morning at 10:30. They were both drinking coffee. We later learned that one was a terrorist, the other a journalist. I don't know if someone betrayed them but the police knew exactly where to find them. There were fifteen undercover agents scattered around the place, reading, drinking, etc. Suddenly, they all pounced on Monte. They drew their guns and handcuffed the guy and took him away. Afterwards, the police showed us some I.D. and told us all was OK."- Said Fake Claude.

- Did they offer any resistance?

- No. They were jumped by fifteen police. They had no chance.

- Has anything similar happened here?

- No, and I've worked here since 1958.

- What's your opinion of the guy they arrested?

- I don't know the man.

- Do you know he's considered a national hero in Armenia?

- Really? What a surprise. Good for him. He did me no harm.

- Don't you find it strange that the French police arrested someone who's considered a national hero in another country?

- Nowadays so much happens that I'm not really surprised.

The 14th Tribunal of the Paris Court of Justice sentenced Monte Melkonian to six years imprisonment and Zepyur Kasbarian to two years.

After the trial, in 1986, Monte wrote the following letter addressed to the Armenian community:

" I have not petitioned the court for a review of the harsh sentence given to me. I haven't pursued such a course of action because there's no country or court that has the right to judge our struggle nor those who wage it. Secondly, I've tasted the farce that passes as "French justice". Thirdly, a review of my case will not change anything. My sentencing resulted from a political decision. We will resolve the issues we face elsewhere and not in the halls of a judicial system that seems fit to censure us."

Hay Baykar, 1986

Monte's French Defense Counsel consisted of two lawyers – Henri Loglegh and Francoise Segh.

In 1997 Henri Loglegh was the President of France's Human Rights Defense League. Below are excerpts of an interview from 1997.

"Monte Melkonian was able to totally defend his national-patriotic position. He explained the reasons why he fought. His guiding principle in the struggle was top avoid civilian casualities at all costs. I'll always remember how he stressed this point during the trial and how he comported himself in a dignified manner", said Henri Loglegh.

- But weren't you defending a terrorist...?

- My defense was based on the opinion that he was not a terrorist but someone involved in a struggle. As an activist, his primary focus was how to advance the struggle and not on how to plan senstaional acts that would result in innocent deaths. This position of his should have been lauded. In any event, at the core of my defense was the argument that Monte wasn't a terrorist (as currently defined).

- Given his character, wasn't he more peaceful than...?

- Yes, in my article I refer to him as a peace-loving terrorist.

- What effect did Monte's speech have during the trial?

- The efect was that there was no doubt that we were dealing with a unique kind of terrorist. It wasn't the usual speech of your average terrorist. I've defended a number of Armenians who have been entangled in unjustifiable acts. Monte was different. The impression he conveyed to the court was of a strong-willed and brave man. He was brave not only due to the struggle he waged on behalf of his people but also because he fought against all those whose foolish actions clouded the correct perception of Armenia's freedom. I don't particularly take a hard line regarding those who resort to unacceptable means and weapons in their struggle. But I respect those who have the courage to refuse to employ those methods. Monte was one of those people.

- You say that Monte was a peace-loving terrorist. When did you start to feel that, in prison?

- Yes, when we had our conversations there. We had a problem, though. His French was poor and so was my English. In the end, we overcame this.

- Do you think Monte benefitted from his time in jail?

- Usually people in prison wind-up viewing their life from afar and have a chance to evaluate their past actions. This is especially the case for active people like Monte who fill their time in prison with much self-analysis. I believe this is what happened in Monte's case.

- When and how did you hear about his death?

- I remember it well. At the time I was in a cafe in the 18 th district of Paris. An Armenian activist who had been in jail and whom I had defended in another matter came to see me there. When he asked, "Do you know Monte Melkonian has been killed?", I felt sad.

- Do you know he's a national hero in Armenia?

- Yes, I've heard this many times.

- Don't you think this fact proves your description of him as a peace-loving terrorist?

- He was a man who deeply loved his country and a brave and wise warrior. I find it only natural that he assumed such responsibilities after Armenia's independence. Given the many difficulties that Armenia has overcome (that I'm aware of), such a man should be a hero.

Below are excerpts of an interview with Monte's other lawyer, Francoise Segh.

Francoise Segh – Monte bore the internal political responsibility of a movement engaged in ruthless actions against Turkish targets, mostly outside France. He was a special case. I've had dealings with lesser combattants during other trials. These were peoplewho merely carried out certain acts. Monte was able to ideologically analyze the struggle and his responsibility in it. Despite his young age I felt I was dealing with someone with a deep political understanding of his people's history, their liberation movement and the various forms of armed struggle. This made him stand apart.

- Thus you won't be surprised to learn that someone like him has become a national hero?

It doesn't surprise me due to certain political and historical reasons. Today, Armenians have their lands and people like Melkonian can be included in that land's history. He went to prison a young man and was still young when he got out. But there's no doubt he matured while inside. He read voraciously, put his thoughts down in writing and sharpened his ideological faculties. He was a man who gave meaning to his life and stayed true to his principles till the very end. He left a lasting impression.

"From November 28, 1985 till February 5, 1989 I was imprisoned by the French authorities. The conditions in prison were pretty bad. Not only were the food, sanitary and medical conditions poor, especially in Fresnes prison, but on top of this the government devised numerous other repressive measures. I spent two months in an isolation cell, my correspondence with the outside was closely monitored and I was subjected to other arbitrary punishments. Only one person outside my family was allowed to visit. My cell was searched practically daily and turned upside-down. During one stretch they confiscated my writings. They would often conduct humiliating body searches. I couldn't receive newspapers although French law expressly guaranteed my right to do so. Some of the guards took special pleasure in mistreating me and neglected my health needs. Prison authorities would use the flimsiest of pretexts to place me in a cold and dirty cell, often without any toilet facilities for extended periods."

Excerpted from Monte Melkonian's, Self-Criticism, 1990

While in prison Monte wrote to his brother Markar:

"Every person should spend at least on month in jail. Every judge should spend one year in prison to better understand the consequences of his actions."

In February 1989 he was released from prison and deported to Yemen.

In 1990 Monte Melkonian arrived in Armenia.

Edik Baghdasaryan
Interviews conducted June 1997, Paris
http://www.hetq.am/e...06-monte-1.html

#33 Arvestaked

Arvestaked

    Aspiring Memetic Engineer

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 751 posts
  • Location:Cacapoopoopeepeeshire

Posted 12 June 2007 - 01:47 PM

Thanks. I'll probably read "Self-Criticism" now.

#34 AVO

AVO

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,184 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 12 June 2007 - 02:28 PM

Republic of Armenia would be a different place if it wasn't for him

#35 Aratta-Kingdom

Aratta-Kingdom

    www.ArmaniKingdom.com

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,234 posts

Posted 13 June 2007 - 09:56 PM

QUOTE(Avo47 @ Jun 12 2007, 01:28 PM) View Post
Republic of Armenia would be a different place if it wasn't for him


Montei arats@ anpoxarineli er. Monten inqn er anpoxarineli. Bayc yes dzernapah kmnai qo aratsi pes artahaytutyun aneluc. Sa asel chi merjum kam nsemacnum em iren andz@ kam ir arats@. Bayc yerb inch vor ban (gaghaparaxosutyun, ser, ...) kam inch vor mekin (sksats qo isk andzic...) kurqi astijani es bardzracnum, ktrvum es irakanutyunic u darnum es dra gerin. Ays @ndhacqum amenavtangavor@ na e vor korcnum es inqd qez u inqnaxabkanqi janaparhi vra inqd qez dnelov, darnum es qo kurqi gerin. Im xorin hamozmamb, hajoghutyan hasnelu miak dzev@ shitakutyunn u haraberutyun karucelu arvestin gaxtniqnerin tirapeteln a. Tvyal depqum, Monten qani vor chka, ira het kapn el bnakanabar chka. Yete mer u ira geraguyn dzragir@ mek a, u yete ira arats@ shahavet ardyunq er talis, hetevabar hark e vor irenic jarangutyun stacatsi gaxtniqneri mej xoranalov haraberutyun karucel ayn irakanutyan het vor@ inqn er stegtsel. Mer unecatsin ter kangnel kam korcrats@ het vercnel chi verabervum miayn hogerin. Mez toghats nayev mtayin jarangutyan@ yete ter kangnenq, inqners zarganalov nayev kirakanacnenq henc Montei amenamets cankutyun@. Qani der mez mot mtqi irakan dproc chi himnvel, menq karchats enq mnalu inch vor kurqi, inch vor gagaparaxosutyuan gerin darnalov. Xorin harganqs bolor nranc ovqer lav gortser en arel, bayc jogovrdi dern u nshanakutyun@ yerbeq voch mi harcum yerkrodakan gtsi vra ari chdnenq. Monteic araj Marshal Bagramyan@, Andranik@ u Njen el en shat lav gortser arel. Jamanaki u taratsutyan mej ays bolor@ havasar klinen zroi yete poxanak irenc kurq dardznelu, chkamrjvenq/chhagordakcvenq irenq kogmic stegtstats irakanutyan het. Dra lavaguyn orinak@ Davit-Beki toghats jarangutyunn er vor poshiacav irenic heto. Andzi mahic heto amboghj 6 tarva haxtanakner@ arjeqazrkvecin qanzi chkar hetevord vor poxanak iren pashtelu, iren toghats gorts@ sharunaker.




#36 MosJan

MosJan

    Էլի ԼաՎա

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 27,871 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:My Little Armenia

Posted 30 June 2007 - 03:25 AM



#37 Aratta-Kingdom

Aratta-Kingdom

    www.ArmaniKingdom.com

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,234 posts

Posted 04 July 2007 - 12:42 AM

[quote name='MosJan' date='Jun 12 2007, 12:21 AM' post='202112']

There's No Country Or Court That Has The Right To Judge Our Struggle

Does anyone know what happened to 'Nor Serund' ASALA paper? Do they still print it?

#38 AVO

AVO

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,184 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 04 July 2007 - 01:16 AM

Printed by whom? ASALA is defunct.

#39 Aratta-Kingdom

Aratta-Kingdom

    www.ArmaniKingdom.com

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,234 posts

Posted 04 July 2007 - 10:37 AM

QUOTE(Avo47 @ Jul 4 2007, 12:16 AM)
Printed by whom? ASALA is defunct.


About 10 years ago they were printing a paper in L.A., but I guess they don't exist anymore.

Are you a dashnak?


#40 AVO

AVO

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,184 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 04 July 2007 - 03:13 PM

No. I have no political affiliation. I'm Armenian




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users