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Raymond Damadian


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#1 Arpa

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Posted 27 August 2002 - 07:03 PM

http://web.mit.edu/i...H/damadian.html

#2 MosJan

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Posted 27 August 2002 - 08:13 PM

http://web.mit.edu/i...madianbar.gif 1

RAYMOND V. DAMADIAN

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

Raymond V. Damadian, inventor of the method known today as magnetic resonance imaging or MRI, was born in Forest Hills, New York in 1936. He studied violin at the Julliard School of Music in New York for eight years before winning a scholarship, at age 16, to the University of Wisconsin. There he received a BS in mathematics in 1956 and then turned to medicine, earning an MD in 1960 from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine (Bronx, NY).
After his internship, residency, and Fellowships at Washington University and Harvard, Dr. Damadian served for some time in the Air Force, then joined the faculty of SUNY Downstate Medical Center. There, his research into sodium and potassium in living cells led him to his first experiments with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) which caused him to first propose the MR body scanner in 1969.

NMR, the phenomenon of atomic nuclei emitting radio waves at predictable frequencies when exposed to a powerful magnetic field, had been used during and after World War II to probe the composition of various substances. Damadian invented an apparatus and method to use NMR safely and accurately to scan the human body, a method now well known as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

Experimenting on rats, Damadian discovered dramatic differences in the quality and duration of NMR signals emitted by cancerous versus healthy tissues that confirmed his idea of the MR body scanner. His 1971 paper, "Tumor Detection by Magnetic Resonance," was met with skepticism from the scientific community, but Damadian forged ahead, filing the first of his patents for an MRI scanner the next year. The scanner used liquid helium to supercool magnets in the walls of a cylindrical chamber; the nuclei of hydrogen atoms in the water, which all cells contain, reacted to the resultant magnetic field, and a three-dimensional spatial localization method coordinated the signals into the scan.

Damadian spent the next years working with teams of graduate students to make his scanner a reality. Meanwhile, many scientists had decided that Damadian's ideas were not so misguided after all and began to compete to develop the first workable scanner. Finally, in 1977, Damadian's team produced the first MRI scan of the human body, using a prototype device he called "Indomitable" (now installed in the Smithsonian Institution).

The first MRI scan provided a clear image of the heart, lungs and chest wall with no side effects. Today, MRI scanners can instantly map and analyze any part of the human body in minute detail, allowing visual diagnosis of virtually any medical condition, from strained muscles to tumors. They can also provide the chemical composition of the tissue being scanned.

In 1978, Damadian formed a company, FONAR Corporation (from "Field fOcused Nuclear mAgnetic Resonance"), which produced the first commercial scanner in 1980. Later the company developed the first FDA-approved, first mobile, and first whole-body MR scanners. FONAR's patented Iron Circuit™ technology has enabled the company to develop seven different MRI products including the recently cleared-for-marketing FONAR 360°, a full-size room with two circular structures (the poles of the magnet) projecting from the ceiling and the floor. There are no obstructions between the patient and the walls of the scanner room, and the patient is accessible from any direction. Damadian is also working on the Stand-Up MRI™, the only scanner that allows MRI patients to be scanned while standing up.

Damadian continues to direct FONAR's scientific and financial progress, as Chairman and President. He has earned over 40 patents, as well as the 2001 Lemelson-MIT Program's Lifetime Achievement Award, a National Medal of Technology (1988), and induction into the National Inventors Hall of Fame (1989).

#3 Sip

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Posted 27 August 2002 - 08:31 PM

Wow that so awesome! Actually I was talking yesterday to my brother about what an amazing invention MRI is ... but neither of us had any idea about this!

#4 TigrannesIII

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Posted 27 August 2002 - 09:56 PM

oo-rah-rah-wis-kahn-sin!!! praise to thee our alma mater.......

#5 Arpa

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Posted 28 August 2002 - 05:51 AM

I had the pleasure of running into Dr. Damadian some years ago. Needless to say, it was at an Armenian affair. What surprised me, aside from his fame of a first class scientist, was that he is also a devout Christian, a motivational speaker, an unordained pastor, yet above all, he is also an abashed Armenian. He may, by the definition of some of us, be an assimilated American but in no way is he alienated. He opens every one of his (scientific) presentations with a prayer and an inspirational devotion.
To see why, click below.
Note: There are numerous references to him on the internet. You may use key words as; Damadian MRI, Damadian chrsitian and Damadian Armenian, or just plain Damadian.

http://www.christian...7r1/7r1062.html

#6 Sip

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Posted 28 August 2002 - 01:09 PM

quote:
Damadian and his wife eventually read the Bible cover to cover several times together. "I don't know what it's like for people in other professions, but for the scientific mind, the Bible is wonderful if you read it from start to finish. It fits together with an astonishing consistency, which was the opposite of my secular perception. My early impressions were that it was rife with contradictions."
Talk about a paragraph that I never even imagined seeing. He is really a strange one!!! I think I now understand what they mean by a paradox wrapped in an enigma served in the form of a riddle (or something like that).

#7 MosJan

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Posted 28 August 2002 - 01:09 PM

es mardu masin kardalov - 4" boyovatsa

#8 Sip

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Posted 28 August 2002 - 02:38 PM

quote:
Originally posted by MosJan:
es mardu masin kardalov - 4" boyovatsa





Amot Amot Amot ... es inch baner es asum Movses?

#9 MosJan

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Posted 28 August 2002 - 03:47 PM

Seaphan jan isk duq inchu eq etter nayum ???

bayst te shat pisn es ha - mard ban chasi vraz du & Haorut@ mi ban k@gtneq -

el cheq asum vro invalid mard em -

#10 Twilight Bark

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Posted 06 October 2003 - 04:46 PM

The Nobel Assembly at Karolinska Institutet on Monday awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for 2003 jointly to Paul C Lauterbur and Peter Mansfield for their discoveries concerning magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

Thus, Raymond Damadian received what is in technical jargon called "the middle finger". It would be mildly interesting to know the politics involved.

#11 Twilight Bark

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Posted 06 October 2003 - 05:05 PM

Here is a link that explains some of the controversy that most will consider now resolved:

http://www.opinionjo...e/?id=110001844

#12 Teutonic Knight

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Posted 06 October 2003 - 05:29 PM

No wonder they snatched the award from him, I wonder who's behind that decision :rolleyes:

Are there any Armenian Nobel prize winners?

#13 Sip

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Posted 06 October 2003 - 06:29 PM

That's pretty ****ed up. At times like this, you really start to wonder about the "scientific community".

#14 nairi

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Posted 06 October 2003 - 06:34 PM

Are there any Armenian Nobel prize winners?

Are there any Armenian Nobel prizes? :)

I'm patiently waiting for Sip to be the first :)

#15 Azat

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Posted 06 October 2003 - 06:35 PM

TB, I read that this morning prior to getting to work and was flabbergasted how he was not mentioned anywhere. Too sad for him as he really is the one who took the Nuclear MRI technology that was being used for chemistry and applied it to medicine.

#16 Sip

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Posted 06 October 2003 - 06:50 PM

I'm patiently waiting for Sip to be the first :)

he he hehehehe hhahahaaaaa hahahahaha ... love the use of the word "patiently" there. :D I'll probably win an Oscar or an emmy before a Nobel ... B) :P

#17 Azat

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Posted 06 October 2003 - 06:57 PM

Are there any Armenian Nobel prizes? :)

I'm patiently waiting for Sip to be the first :)

I second that. We know we are in the surroundings of a Genius whom the world has not recognized.

#18 Teutonic Knight

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Posted 06 October 2003 - 07:29 PM

That's pretty ****ed up. At times like this, you really start to wonder about the "scientific community".

It's a community alright. Just not scientific.

#19 790

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Posted 08 October 2003 - 08:20 PM

was he also the one who coined the term, MRI ?

#20 gamavor

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Posted 08 October 2003 - 09:11 PM

Prize Eludes LI MRI Developer

Newsday (New York)
October 7, 2003

By Richard J. Dalton Jr., Staff Writer

Eight years after publishing a scientific article in 1971 on how
magnetic imaging could tell the difference between normal cells and
cancerous ones, Dr. Raymond Damadian started a company called Fonar to
develop and sell MRI scanners.

Even though the technology has helped revolutionize medical diagnostics,
it hasn't necessarily helped the bottom line of the Melville-based
company regardless of who gets credit for the discovery of the technology.

Fonar, which competes with giants including General Electric, Siemens,
Philips, Hitachi and Toshiba, suffered a net loss of $15 million on
revenues of $52.9 million in fiscal 2003.

But some of its 84 patents have proved profitable. In 1997, Fonar
received $128.7 million from General Electric for patent infringement.
Many other companies that use MRI technology had already settled Fonar's
patent infringement claims.

Some of Fonar's patents have expired, but the company has now focused on
new technologies, including the stand-up MRI, which sells for $1.5
million. The stand-up MRI allows patients to stand, bend, sit or lie at
an angle, helping doctors detect symptoms that might only be visible in
a certain position, such as a slipped disk.

Even last month, Damadian was still receiving patents related to
magnetic resonance imaging. On Sept. 16, he was among the inventors
listed in a patent granted for an open-entry MRI scanner to provide
easier access to the patient.

Yesterday his rivals, Paul Lauterbur, from the United States, and Peter
Mansfield, from the United Kingdom, were awarded the Nobel prize in
medicine for work on the MRI.

But in a 1971 article published in the journal Science, Damadian showed
that cancer cells and normal cells would emit different magnetic
resonance signals, an important discovery that brought magnetic
resonance technology from a tool of chemists to a tool of physicians.

"Before that, no one knew there would be any of this difference," said
Daniel Culver, spokesman for Fonar Corp. Damadian and colleagues are
also credited with creating the first magnetic resonance image of a
body. But Fonar's MRI machines now use Lauterbur's technology.

Damadian, 67, who was not available for comment, also coined the acronym
MR (magnetic resonance) and FONAR, from "Field fOcused Nuclear mAgnetic
Resonance."

In 1978, he founded Fonar Corp., and now serves as president, chief
executive and treasurer of the company. Whoever deserves credit for the
modern MRI, the device is clearly a breakthrough, allowing non-invasive
examination of the body.

Each year, more than 60 million MRI scans are conducted worldwide. MRI
scans have transformed the diagnosis and treatment of cancer.

And the scans are especially useful for examining the brain and spinal
cord abnormalities, including inflammation due to multiple sclerosis.

"From a neurologist's point of view, I don't think we want to look at
images unless there is the level of quality of MRI," said Dr. Jerry
Wolinsky, a Bartels Family Professor of Neurology at The University of
Texas Health Science Center at Houston.


http://www.newsday.c...y-top-headlines



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PS: How about registering the patents and trademarks in Republic of Armenia and in US and then bringing the law suits for intelectual property infringement.




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