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The city of Ani


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#101 MJ

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Posted 10 July 2001 - 03:14 PM

OK. I'll send a couple of emails to some friends in Armenia, and ask them to collect some information.

#102 edward demian

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Posted 01 September 2001 - 04:35 PM

Once again I find myself admiring the Jews and their practical minds.
Whille we bicker and dream about "our lands" and the monuments therein; If this was a Jewish issue, some Jewish organization would have quietly helped settle a few Turkish families (of Armenian descent) and Turkish cityzenship in the immediate area, and then there would be no more vandalism or fear. The Zionists would place small patriotic settlers in key hystorical spots and let nature take its course.

#103 MJ

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Posted 02 September 2001 - 02:47 AM

How about trying to resolve the issue in more fundamental ways?

#104 Yervant1

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Posted 13 March 2013 - 10:32 AM

43,657 VISITED ANI IN 2012

http://hetq.am/eng/n...ni-in-2012.html
14:57, March 12, 2013

A Hurriyet news article says that 43,657 visitors travelled to the
ancient Armenian city of Ani, almost double the 23,400 that visited
in 2011.

Kars Culture and Tourism Manager Hakan Doganay said there were a
total of 21 main cultural treasures in Ani. "In fact, we call Ani an
iceberg because we know there is a lot to discover and excavate at
Ani," he said.

Doganay added that if excavations are completed at the site, it could
become one of Turkey's top tourism sites.

#105 Yervant1

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Posted 13 March 2013 - 10:35 AM

THE ANCIENT ARMENIAN CITY OF ANI ATTRACTS MORE VISITORS

http://www.armradio....-more-visitors/
15:23 12.03.2013

The ancient Armenian city of Ani in the eastern province of Kars
continues to attract more tourists each year. In 2012, a total of
43,657 people visited the site close to a third of the visitors are
from foreign countries, according to tourism officials, the Hurriyet
Daily News reports, noting that "Ani has long been regarded as one
of Turkey's most impressive tourist sites."

Speaking to Anatolia news agency, Kars Culture and Tourism Manager
Hakan Doganay said there were a total of 21 main cultural treasures
in Ani. "In fact, we call Ani an iceberg because we know there is a
lot to discover and excavate at Ani."

Experts know that Ani was a trade center in the past, said Doganay,
adding that the ancient city was a cultural mosaic. The cultural
manager further said that if excavations were completed at the site,
it could become one of the country's leading tourism sites.

The planned excavation work will involve creating a detailed map of
the site, which was once the center of a powerful Armenian empire and
possessed a population of between 100,000 and 200,000 over a millennium
ago, making it one of the biggest cities in the world at the time.

The Hurriyet daily News reminds that Ani was once the capital of a
medieval Armenian kingdom that covered much of present-day Armenia
and eastern Turkey.

Dubbed the "City of 1,001 Churches," Ani stood on various trade routes,
and its many religious buildings, palaces, and fortifications were
among the most technically and artistically advanced structures in
the world at the time, according to specialists.

The site occupied 78 hectares of land and was surrounded by
4,500-meter-long ramparts. In addition to its numerous churches, the
site also features the remains of an inn, a public bath, one of the
first mosques in Anatolia and other buildings. The site was located
on the historic Silk Road and formed the first gate connecting the
Caucasus to Anatolia before a sea route was discovered.

"Ani is a city of universal religions. We call it a world city
since people from all nations, cultures, and races live there," he
said. "It is essential to bring this world city to light and give it
to the world as soon as possible. Our work is ongoing in a planned
and systematic way."

#106 Yervant1

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Posted 10 December 2015 - 11:05 AM

PREHISTORIC ROCK PAINTINGS DISCOVERED CLOSE TO THE ANCIENT ARMENIAN CITY OF ANI

16:35, 10 Dec 2015
Siranush Ghazanchyan

Fifteen rock paintings discovered in a village close to the ancient
city of Ani in Kars will play a significant role for the area to be
declared a world heritage site by UNESCO.

The head of the Culture and Arts Association in the eastern province of
Kars, Vedat Akcayöz, has said the registration of 15 rock paintings
discovered around the Alem village, some 11 kilometers away from the
ancient city of Ani on the Turkish-Armenian border, has been sent to
the Museum Directorate, adding the hope was to have the entire area
added to UNESCO's World Heritage list, the Hurriyet Daily News reports.

Akcayöz said the 15 rock paintings carved on the rocks depicted
hunting scenes with horses, dogs, mountain goats, deer and humans.

He said that upon their application, Kars Museum Director Necmettin
Alp, Culture and Tourism Provincial Director Hakan Dogancay and Board
of Protection of Cultural Property Director Yasin Dursun had begun
works to register the Prehistoric-era rock paintings.

Akcayöz said they had asked for the region to be declared an
archaeological site, adding they hoped the ancient city of Ani and
its environment would be included in the UNESCO World Heritage list
in 2016.

Stating that the association had been supporting Kars' culture and
arts for 15 years, Akcayöz said the following:

"2016 will be a very important year for the future of Ani, Kars and
Turkish tourism. The Alem village is home to 15 rock paintings that
have never been examined and belong to humanity. The importance of
this discovery is that Ani and its environment dates back thousands
of years older than we had known. Therefore the inns, rock tombs
and settlements around the ancient city of Ani should be declared an
archaeological site as a whole. Works have started in the rock tombs.

On Nov. 24, a committee including the museum director, archaeologist
and art historians coordinated to collect the data for registration.

These rock paintings will play a significant role for the ruins of
Ani to be included in the UNESCO list in 2016."

The ancient Ani was once the capital of a medieval Armenian kingdom
that covered much of present-day Armenia and eastern Turkey. Ani is
protected on its eastern side by a ravine formed by the Akhurian River
and on its western side by the Bostanlar or Tzaghkotzadzor Valley. The
Akhurian is a branch of the Aras River and forms part of the current
border between Turkey and Armenia.

http://www.armradio....an-city-of-ani/
 



#107 Yervant1

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Posted 12 December 2015 - 12:18 PM

ANI'S ROCK PAINTINGS BELONG TO HUMANITY

Hurriyet Daily News, Turkey
Dec 10 2015

KARS - Anadolu Agency

Fifteen rock paintings discovered in a village close to the ancient
city of Ani in Kars will play a significant role for the area to be
declared a world heritage site by UNESCO, according to officials

The head of the Culture and Arts Association in the eastern province of
Kars, Vedat Akcayöz, has said the registration of 15 rock paintings
discovered around the Alem village, some 11 kilometers away from the
ancient city of Ani on the Turkish-Armenian border, has been sent to
the Museum Directorate, adding the hope was to have the entire area
added to UNESCO's World Heritage list.

Akcayöz said the 15 rock paintings carved on the rocks depicted
hunting scenes with horses, dogs, mountain goats, deer and humans.

He said that upon their application, Kars Museum Director Necmettin
Alp, Culture and Tourism Provincial Director Hakan Dogancay and Board
of Protection of Cultural Property Director Yasin Dursun had begun
works to register the Prehistoric-era rock paintings.

Akcayöz said they had asked for the region to be declared an
archaeological site, adding they hoped the ancient city of Ani and
its environment would be included in the UNESCO World Heritage list
in 2016.

Stating that the association had been supporting Kars' culture and
arts for 15 years, Akcayöz said the following:

"2016 will be a very important year for the future of Ani, Kars and
Turkish tourism. The Alem village is home to 15 rock paintings that
have never been examined and belong to humanity. The importance of
this discovery is that Ani and its environment dates back thousands
of years older than we had known. Therefore the inns, rock tombs
and settlements around the ancient city of Ani should be declared an
archaeological site as a whole. Works have started in the rock tombs.

On Nov. 24, a committee including the museum director, archaeologist
and art historians coordinated to collect the data for registration.

These rock paintings will play a significant role for the ruins of
Ani to be included in the UNESCO list in 2016."

The ancient Ani was once the capital of a medieval Armenian kingdom
that covered much of present-day Armenia and eastern Turkey. Ani is
protected on its eastern side by a ravine formed by the Akhurian River
and on its western side by the Bostanlar or Tzaghkotzadzor Valley. The
Akhurian is a branch of the Aras River and forms part of the current
border between Turkey and Armenia.


http://www.hurriyetd...1&NewsCatID=375



#108 Yervant1

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Posted 11 July 2016 - 10:10 AM

Amazing a Turkish newspaper mentioning about the Armenian Kingdom.

Daily Sabah, Turkey

July 10 2016


UNESCO convenes in Istanbul for new heritage sites

DAILY SABAH
ISTANBUL


İstanbul, home to many landmarks on the coveted United Nations
Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) World
Heritage sites list, will this week host the next meeting to designate
new heritage sites for protection. The 40th session of the UNESCO
committee opened on Sunday at Istanbul's Congress Center. The 10-day
summit will see an examination of proposals to add 26 more sites to
the list, enabling their permanent conservation. The delegates from
UNESCO-member countries will also discuss the state of conservation at
156 sites from around the world.

This year's nominees makes up a diverse list ranging from the Lut
Desert in Iran to Mistaken Point, an ecological reserve in Canada;
Ennedi Massif in Chad to a naval dockyard in Antigua and Barbuda.
Although most are archeological sites from ancient times, nominees
also include more contemporary works such as buildings by renowned
Swiss-French architect Le Corbusier in Argentina, Belgium, France,
Germany, India, Japan and Switzerland. Le Corbusier, who died in 1965,
was a pioneer of modern architecture and responsible for a wide array
of architectural works, from residences in Europe and South America to
a government building in Russia. He also worked as a consultant in the
design of the U.N. headquarters in New York. For Turkey, the meeting
will decide whether Ani, an archaeological site in the eastern city of
Kars, will be designated as a World Heritage Site. Ani hosted empires
and kingdoms throughout its history, from the Bagratid Kingdom of
Armenians to Byzantine, before it fell into the hands of Turks after
the conquest of Seljuk Sultan Alparslan in 1064. Ani is touted as the
first city conquered Turks within the borders of present-day Turkey.

Earthquakes and a Mongol invasion decreased Ani's population in the
13th and 14th centuries, and it was reduced to a small village,
currently uninhabited. Located near the Turkish-Armenian border in the
Turkish province of Kars, Ani is home to Seljuk mosques and churches
built by Armenians, only a few of which have survived to the present
day.

https://urldefense.p...mSg2JPaV5O6c&e=

 

 



#109 Yervant1

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Posted 16 July 2016 - 07:40 AM

Medieval Armenian capital of Ani inscribed on UNESCO World Heritage List
Ani-1-620x300.jpg
 

The Archaeological Site of Ani has been inscribed on the UNESCO World Heritage List.

This site is located on a secluded plateau of northeast Turkey overlooking a ravine that forms a natural border with Armenia. This medieval city combines residential, religious and military structures, characteristic of a medieval urbanism built up over the centuries by Christian and then Muslim dynasties.

The city flourished in the 10th and 11th centuries CE when it became the capital of the medieval Armenian kingdom of the Bagratides and profited from control of one branch of the Silk Road. Later, under Byzantine, Seljuk, and Georgian sovereignty, it maintained its status as an important crossroads for merchant caravans.

The Mongol invasion and a devastating earthquake in 1319 marked the beginning of the city’s decline. The site presents a comprehensive overview of the evolution of medieval architecture through examples of almost all the different architectural innovations of the region between the 7th and 13thcenturies CE.

http://www.armradio....-heritage-list/

 


#110 Yervant1

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Posted 16 July 2016 - 07:46 AM

Eastern Turkey's Ani Ruins in World Heritage List

Ani Ruins inclusion puts number of Turkish sites in UNESCO World Heritage List at 16 

thumbs_b_c_be58f52195202285007512e591e61
 
 
Features
archive
 

ISTANBUL

The World Heritage Committee included Friday the Ani Ruins in eastern Turkey on UNESCO's World Heritage List.

The Ani Ruins are located in the Kars province. It is unclear when Ani was founded but it became the capital city of the Kingdom of Armenia in the 10th century, according to UNESCO's website.

"From the tenth to fourteenth century, Ani was an important trade city situated on the Silk Route extended from China to Europe. The remains of the outstanding structures belonging to this period testify to a spectacular architectural development, resulting from the blend of eastern and western traditions. The site is crucial to the understanding of trade and settlement within a multi-ethnic and multi-cultural framework during the middle ages," according to UNESCO. 

The 40th session of the World Heritage Committee began on July 10 in Istanbul and will end on July 20. 

With this inclusion, the number of sites from Turkey in the World Heritage List increased to 16. 

"It is pleasing for Turkey to be included in the World Heritage List again," Turkish Culture and Tourism Minister Nabi Avci said during his visit in the Sakarya province of the Marmara region.

http://aa.com.tr/en/...age-list/608199

 





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