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Woman Of The Day


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#21 angel4hope

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Posted 15 December 2003 - 10:29 PM

???? " before sex was invented....." ummmmmmmmmm?! weird one there--sex was not an invention but rather a human instinct that cannot even be dated back--basically someone had to have had sex in order to reproduce offspring.......

#22 Anileve

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Posted 15 December 2003 - 10:29 PM

QUOTE (Azat @ Dec 16 2003, 12:22 AM)
Not you guys but just Sip.

Fine then, Sip GO STAND IN THE CORNER NOW!!! nono.gif (I love this one by the way)



#23 Dan

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Posted 15 December 2003 - 10:32 PM

QUOTE
Miranda Barry successfully masqueraded as a man for over fifty years

jawdrop.gif wow... unsure.gif blink.gif ohmy.gif huh.gif not enough emoticons for it..

#24 Anileve

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Posted 15 December 2003 - 10:32 PM

QUOTE (angel4hope @ Dec 16 2003, 12:29 AM)
???? " before sex was invented....." ummmmmmmmmm?! weird one there--sex was not an invention but rather a human instinct that cannot even be dated back--basically someone had to have had sex in order to reproduce offspring.......

I would think that it means, before sex was redefined. Since at that time everyone had established roles that were not to be questioned. Hence Simone de Beauvoir's "The Second Sex".

#25 Dan

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Posted 15 December 2003 - 10:34 PM

QUOTE
Simone de Beauvoir's "The Second Sex"

I know ---> offtopic.gif , but a very good book thumbup.gif

#26 angel4hope

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Posted 15 December 2003 - 10:40 PM

ohhhh thanx for clearing thigs up anileve. Now that makes more sense. Haha im a dummie...

#27 Anileve

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Posted 15 December 2003 - 10:42 PM

I am glad you liked it Dan, it's wonderful! A brilliant woman she was. And about Masquerading as a man for 50 years, remember I have mentioned before that women know menís psychology like the back of their hand; therefore it is very easy to mislead them. Watch out! biggrin.gif

#28 hyebruin

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Posted 16 December 2003 - 03:32 AM

ani jan! you're freakin' hillarious!!! lol.gif loved reading your posts and the crazy responses!! more more more!! tongue.gif ...you and i are on the same wavelength as far as disciplining bad boys!---though i must say YOUR method is more merciful than mine!! rolleyes.gif

#29 Dan

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Posted 16 December 2003 - 10:14 AM

QUOTE
you and i are on the same wavelength as far as disciplining bad boys!---though i must say YOUR method is more merciful than mine!!

huh.gif blink.gif lol.. disciplining?? ohmy.gif ph34r.gif

And yes, MORE MORE, anileve jan! cool.gif This thread is great. wink.gif tongue.gif

#30 Dan

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Posted 16 December 2003 - 10:21 AM

OK, here's my contribution to the "woman of the day" biggrin.gif :

Ada Byron, Lady Lovelace
December 10, 1815 - November 27, 1852

Ada Byron, Lady Lovelace, was one of the most picturesque characters in computer history. Augusta Ada Byron was born December 10, 1815 the daughter of the illustrious poet, Lord Byron. Five weeks after Ada was born Lady Byron asked for a separation from Lord Byron, and was awarded sole custody of Ada who she brought up to be a mathematician and scientist. Lady Byron was terrified that Ada might end up being a poet like her father. Despite Lady Byron's programming Ada did not sublimate her poetical inclinations. She hoped to be "an analyst and a metaphysician". In her 30's she wrote her mother, if you can't give me poetry, can't you give me "poetical science?" Her understanding of mathematics was laced with imagination, and described in metaphors.
At the age of 17 Ada was introduced to Mary Somerville, a remarkable woman who translated LaPlace's works into English, and whose texts were used at Cambridge. Though Mrs. Somerville encouraged Ada in her mathematical studies, she also attempted to put mathematics and technology into an appropriate human context. It was at a dinner party at Mrs. Somerville's that Ada heard in November, 1834, Babbage's ideas for a new calculating engine, the Analytical Engine. He conjectured: what if a calculating engine could not only foresee but could act on that foresight. Ada was touched by the "universality of his ideas". Hardly anyone else was.

Babbage worked on plans for this new engine and reported on the developments at a seminar in Turin, Italy in the autumn of 1841. An Italian, Menabrea, wrote a summary of what Babbage described and published an article in French about the development. Ada, in 1843, married to the Earl of Lovelace and the mother of three children under the age of eight, translated Menabrea's article. When she showed Babbage her translation he suggested that she add her own notes, which turned out to be three times the length of the original article. Letters between Babbage and Ada flew back and forth filled with fact and fantasy. In her article, published in 1843, Lady Lovelace's prescient comments included her predictions that such a machine might be used to compose complex music, to produce graphics, and would be used for both practical and scientific use. She was correct.

When inspired Ada could be very focused and a mathematical taskmaster. Ada suggested to Babbage writing a plan for how the engine might calculate Bernoulli numbers. This plan, is now regarded as the first "computer program." A software language developed by the U.S. Department of Defense was named "Ada" in her honor in 1979.

After she wrote the description of Babbage's Analytical Engine her life was plagued with illnesses, and her social life, in addition to Charles Babbage, included Sir David Brewster (the originator of the kaleidoscope), Charles Wheatstone, Charles Dickens and Michael Faraday. Her interests ranged from music to horses to calculating machines. She has been used as a character in Gibson and Sterling's the Difference Engine, shown writing letters to Babbage in the series " The Machine that Changed the World" and I have gathered her letters and writings in "Ada, The Enchantress of Numbers: A Selection from the Letters of Lord Byron's Daughter and Her Description of the First Computer Though her life was short (like her father, she died at 36), Ada anticipated by more than a century most of what we think is brand-new computing.

http://www.agnesscot.../women/love.htm

Go geeks! laugh.gif

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Edited by Dan, 16 December 2003 - 10:26 AM.


#31 THOTH

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Posted 16 December 2003 - 10:46 AM

QUOTE (hyebruin @ Dec 16 2003, 04:32 AM)
ani jan! you're freakin' hillarious!!! lol.gif loved reading your posts and the crazy responses!! more more more!! tongue.gif ...you and i are on the same wavelength as far as disciplining bad boys!---though i must say YOUR method is more merciful than mine!! rolleyes.gif

I second all of this of course! heartily!

And no - show us no mercy gals! ...I'm more then ready for some strict discipline! yes.gif bangin.gif censored.gif naughty.gif msn-wink.gif msn-oh.gif msn-tongue.gif partytime.gif smoke.gif wub.gif

#32 Dan

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Posted 16 December 2003 - 11:03 AM

QUOTE
And no - show us no mercy gals! ...I'm more then ready for some strict discipline!

lol THOTH, a masochist, are you? blink.gif

#33 Stormig

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Posted 16 December 2003 - 11:07 AM

Wow! Thanks, Dan. Didn't know about Ada Byron.

#34 Dan

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Posted 16 December 2003 - 11:11 AM

QUOTE (Stormy @ Dec 16 2003, 12:07 PM)
Wow! Thanks, Dan. Didn't know about Ada Byron.

Hehe, yes, she's pretty gorgeous, isn't she? smile.gif smile.gif

#35 THOTH

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Posted 16 December 2003 - 11:15 AM

QUOTE (Dan @ Dec 16 2003, 12:03 PM)
lol THOTH, a masochist, are you? blink.gif

No not at all - why would you think such.... ohmy.gif laugh.gif

#36 Dan

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Posted 17 December 2003 - 10:39 AM

Ellen Wilkinson
1891-1947

Ellen Wilkinson, the daughter of a worker in a textile factory, was born in Manchester on 8th October, 1891. Ellen's parents, Richard Wilkinson and Ellen Wood, were both Methodists. After a period out of work, Ellen Wilkinson's father became a an insurance clerk.

Ellen was educated at Ardwick School and at the age of eleven won the first of several scholarships. She later recalled that from this date "I paid for my own education by scholarship until I left university." In 1906 Ellen won a teaching bursary that meant she could enter the Manchester Day Training College for half a week and she spent the rest of the week teaching at Oswald Road Elementary School.

Although her father was a supporter of the Conservative Party, Ellen developed an interested in socialism after reading Merrie England by Robert Blatchford. At the age of sixteen Ellen Wilkinson joined both the Independent Labour Party after hearing a speech made by Kathleen Glasier.

In 1910 Wilkinson became a student at Manchester University where she studied history under Professor George Unwin. Wilkinson was active in the University Socialist Federation where she met Clifford Allen and G.D.H. Cole. Wilkinson became disillusioned with her studies at Manchester and later, when she became involved with the National Council of Labour Colleges, she realised "how little real history" she had been taught at university.

In 1912 became a member of the National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies (NUWSS) and the following year was recruited as a district organizer. Wilkinson also ran the local branch of the Fabian Society where she arranged for people such as Charlotte Despard, Katharine Glasier and Beatrice Webb to speak in Manchester. A pacifist, Wilkinson supported the Non-Conscription Fellowship during the First World War.

There were very few women trade union officials at this time but in July 1915 she was employed by the National Union of Distributive & Allied Workers (AUCE). Wilkinson, the first woman organizer of the AUCE, was also active in local politics and in 1923 was elected to serve on the Manchester City Council.

In the 1924 General Election she was elected to represent Middlesbrough East. In the House of Commons
Wilkinson became known as Red Ellen (both for the colour of her hair and her politics). Active in the 1926 General Strike, afterwards she was co-author with Frank Horrabin and Raymond Postgate of The Workers History of the Great Strike (1927).

Following the 1929 General Election the Prime Minister, Ramsay MacDonald, appointed Wilkinson as Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Health. Wilkinson opposed the National Government formed by MacDonald and as a result lost her seat in the 1931 General Election. While out of the House of Commons Wilkinson wrote two books on politics, Peeps at Politicians (1931) and The Terror in Germany (1933) and a novel, The Division Bell Mystery (1932) and contributed articles to the left-wing feminist journal, Time and Tide.

In the 1935 General Election Wilkinson re-entered Parliament as MP for Jarrow. The town had one of the worst unemployment records in Britain. In 1935 nearly 80% of the insured population was out of work. Of the 8,000 skilled manual workers in Jarrow, only 100 were working. In 1936 Wilkinson organised a march of 200 unemployed workers from Jarrow to London where she presented a petition to parliament calling for government action. Wilkinson later wrote an account of the Jarrow Crusade and its outcome called The Town That Was Murdered (1939).

In 1936 Wilkinson joined with Stafford Cripps, Victor Gollancz, Aneurin Bevan, and George Strauss to start a left-wing weekly journal called Tribune. Wilkinson became associated with the left-wing group of Labour Party MPs that campaigned for the formation of a Popular Front with other left-wing groups in Europe to prevent the spread of fascism.

In the 1936 Labour Party Conference, several party members, including Wilkinson, Stafford Cripps, Aneurin Bevan and Charles Trevelyan, argued that military help should be given to the Spanish Popular Front government, fighting for survival against General Francisco Franco and his right-wing Nationalist Army. Despite a passionate appeal from Senora Isobel de Palencia, the Labour Party supported the Conservative Government's policy of non-intervention.

In December 1936, Wilkinson and Clement Attlee travelled to Spain where they documented the German bombing of Valencia and Madrid and gave support to the International Brigades fighting against General Francisco Franco.

In May 1937 Wilkinson joined with Charlotte Haldane, Duchess of Atholl, Eleanor Rathbone and J. B. Priestley to establish the Dependents Aid Committee, an organization which raised money for the families of men who were members of the International Brigades.

Wilkinson was a strong advocate of Hire Purchase reform. She was concerned about the large number of working-class people who fell into arrears and then lost the goods that they had partly paid for. In 1937 an average of 600 people a day were having high purchase goods seized. These were then sold to the public, providing companies with extra profits. Wilkinson also objected to the high rates of interest being charged on the goods. In 1938 Wilkinson's High Purchase Act became law. The act required traders to display on the goods the actual cash price plus the sum added for interest, and protected hirers who had paid at least one third of the sum contracted.

In the coalition government formed by Winston Churchill in 1940, Wilkinson was appointed parliamentary secretary to the Minister of Pensions. Later she joined the team led by Herbert Morrison at the Home Office. Wilkinson was made responsible for air raid shelters and was instrumental in the introduction of the Morrison Shelters in 1941.

Following the 1945 General Election, the new Prime Minister, Clement Attlee, appointed Wilkinson as Minister of Education, the first woman in British history to hold the post. Wilkinson's plans to increase the school-leaving age to sixteen had to be abandoned when the government decided that the measure would be too expensive. However, she did managed to persuade Parliament to pass the 1946 School Milk Act that gave free milk to all British schoolchildren. Ellen Wilkinson, depressed by her failure to bring in all the reforms she believed necessary, took an overdose of barbiturates and died on 6th February, 1947.

http://www.spartacus...TUwilkinson.htm

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Edited by Dan, 17 December 2003 - 10:40 AM.


#37 Dan

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Posted 20 December 2003 - 03:28 PM

Audre Lorde
1934-1992

"Your Silence Will Not Protect You"
Audrey Geraldine Lorde was born on February 18, 1934 in New York City. She decided to drop the "y" from the end of her name at a young age, setting a precedent in her life of self determination. She was the daughter of Caribbean immigrants who settled in Harlem. She graduated from Columbia University and Hunter College, where she later held the prestigious post of Thomas Hunter Chair of Literature. She was married for eight years in the 1960's, and had two children -- Elizabeth and Jonathan.

Lorde was a self described "Black lesbian, mother, warrior, poet". However, her life was one that could not be summed up in a phrase.

Audre Lorde the Poet
Lorde collected a host of awards and honors, including the Walt Whitman Citation of Merit, which conferred the mantle of New York State poet for 1991-93. In designating her New York State's Poet Laureate, the Governor, Mario Cuomo, said: "Her imagination is charged by a sharp sense of racial injustice and cruelty, of sexual prejudice . . . She cries out against it as the voice of indignant humanity. Audre Lorde is the voice of the eloquent outsider who speaks in a language that can reach and touch people everywhere."

Her first poem was published in Seventeen magazine while she was still in high school. The administration of the high school felt that her work was too romantic for publication in their literary journal. Lorde went on to publish over a dozen books on poetry, and six books of prose.

Audre Lorde the Teacher and Activist
Lorde worked as a librarian while refining her talents as a writer. In 1968, she accepted a teaching position at Tougaloo College in Jackson, Mississippi where the violence that greeted the civil rights movement was close at hand every night. This period cemented the bond between her artistic talents and her dedication to the struggle against injustice.

Lorde went on to provide avenues of expression to future generations of writers by co-founding the Kitchen Table: Women of Color Press. She was at the center of the movement to preserve and celebrate African American culture at a time when the destruction of these institutions was on the rise. Her dedication reached around the world when she formed the Sisterhood in Support of Sisters in South Africa. She was one of the featured speakers at the first national march for gay and lesbian liberation in DC in 1979. In 1989, she helped organize disaster relief efforts for St. Croix in the wake of Hurricane Hugo.

Audre Lorde the Warrior
Late in life, Audre Lorde was given the African name Gamba Adisa, meaning "Warrior: She Who Makes Her Meaning Clear". It is a name that applies to her whole life. Her struggle against opression on many fronts was expressed with a force and clarity that made her a respected voice for women, African Americans, and the Gay and Lesbian community.

Lorde's son Jonathan Rollins recalled the warrior spirit that his mother possesed by stating that not fighting was not an option -- "We could lose. But we couldn't not fight."

Audre Lorde the Quotable
"The quality of light by which we scrutinize our lives has direct bearing upon the product which we live, and upon the changes which we hope to bring about through those lives." ( Poetry Is Not A Luxury)

"When I dare to be powerful - to use my strength in the service of my vision, then it becomes less and less important whether I am afraid".

"I have come to believe over and over again that what is most important to me must be spoken, made verbal and shared, even at the risk of having it bruised or misunderstood."

Audre Lorde the Survivor
Lorde bravely documented her 14-year battle against the cancer in "The Cancer Journals" and in her book of essays "A Burst of Light". In the latter she wrote: ''The struggle with cancer now informs all my days, but it is only another face of that continuing battle for self-determination and survival that black women fight daily, often in triumph.'' She struggled against disease and a medical establishment that was frequently indifferent to cultural differences and insensitive to women's health issues. She stood in defiance to societal rules that said that she should hide the fact that she had breast cancer.

Audre Lorde, died in St Croix, Virgin Islands, on November 17, 1992. Her spirit fights on.

http://www.lambda.ne...imum/lorde.html

#38 Davo0074_NL

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Posted 21 December 2003 - 06:38 AM

Barev Hayer jan,

This Miss Malta was very beautiful but why our armenian woman here don`t add their picture so we can vote or just enjoy their Armenian beauty.

David ph34r.gif

#39 Anileve

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Posted 26 December 2003 - 02:03 AM

Guys I am smiling ear to ear, I am so happy! Thank you for all of your contributions and your support, thank you Dan for being the first guy to post information about those great women. thumbup.gif

Bruin jan, thank you for your inspiring words. I honestly didnít think that this thread would ignite any interest, and thought that I would just be the only reader to enjoy the creation. I am happy to say that I was wrong. You guys are great! clap.gif

And David this is not a Beauty contest thread, please refer to the Ms. HyeForum thread regarding your request. By the way thanks for particularly taking an interest in Ms. Malta with her 7 ďOĒ levels over the rest of the information in this thread. huh.gif

#40 Nvard

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Posted 26 December 2003 - 03:39 AM

rolleyes.gif

GOHAR HARUTYUNYAN

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