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Demonstration of Protest in New York


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#1 MJ

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Posted 28 February 2003 - 02:00 PM

I have just obtained permission from the 17th Precinct of New York Police Department to organize a demonstration of protest in front of the Armenian Mission at the UN at 119 East 36st Street, on Monday, between 5:00-7:00pm on behalf of the Committee for Free and Fair elections in Armenia, which I am forming effective today.

I will make more details available over the weekend.

Those in support of Constitutional Law in Armenia are welcome to attend.

EDIT: I have corrected the typo in the address.

[ February 28, 2003, 08:39 PM: Message edited by: MJ ]

#2 Sasun

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Posted 28 February 2003 - 10:39 PM

quote:
Originally posted by MJ:
I have just obtained permission from the 17th Precinct of New York Police Department to organize a demonstration of protest in front of the Armenian Mission at the UN at 119 East 36st Street, on Monday, between 5:00-7:00pm on behalf of the Committee for Free and Fair elections in Armenia, which I am forming effective today.

I will make more details available over the weekend.

Those in support of Constitutional Law in Armenia are welcome to attend.

EDIT: I have corrected the typo in the address.

Shouldn't you be in Armenia to support the Constitutional Law in Armenia?

In my opinion, your demonstration on a foreign land will only hurt Armenia's international standing. It will not have any positive effect.

#3 MJ

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Posted 01 March 2003 - 03:57 AM

quote:
Originally posted by Sasun:

Shouldn't you be in Armenia to support the Constitutional Law in Armenia?

In my opinion, your demonstration on a foreign land will only hurt Armenia's international standing. It will not have any positive effect.[/QB]

Don't you worry about my location.

International standing of Armenia? What International standing?

It is remarkable that you would find the actions of protest hearting the "international standing of Armenia" and not the outright banditism, election stealing, reprisals or the paralysis of the constitution of Armenia.

[ March 01, 2003, 05:04 AM: Message edited by: MJ ]

#4 Sasun

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Posted 01 March 2003 - 01:48 PM

quote:
Originally posted by MJ:
quote:
Originally posted by Sasun:

Shouldn't you be in Armenia to support the Constitutional Law in Armenia?

In my opinion, your demonstration on a foreign land will only hurt Armenia's international standing. It will not have any positive effect.

Don't you worry about my location.

International standing of Armenia? What International standing?

It is remarkable that you would find the actions of protest hearting the "international standing of Armenia" and not the outright banditism, election stealing, reprisals or the paralysis of the constitution of Armenia.[/QB]

I don't worry about your location. I am just saying that this type of a protest is not something anyone from abroad should do. I would imagine non-Armenians protest in front of the Armenian consulate, for whatever reason (Azeris claiming Artsax, for example).

You may think that your protest is against election stealing, etc. but it will be viewed as a protest against Armenia. The consulate represents the country, not the authorities.

At any rate, I hope that not more than 5 people show up for your demonstration.

#5 MJ

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Posted 01 March 2003 - 02:10 PM

Am I supposed to respond to you?

#6 Azat

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Posted 01 March 2003 - 02:32 PM

quote:
Originally posted by Sasun:
...You may think that your protest is against election stealing, etc. but it will be viewed as a protest against Armenia. The consulate represents the country, not the authorities.

...

Sasun, consulate officials(diplomats) are just an arm of the government. Where else can a Diaspora member protest?

MJ, I am glad that not like the rest of us who sit at home and bitch but never do anything about it, you are doing something right.

Stephan Partamian of ArmenianArts recently on TV had the image of the 3 monkeys(one with the eyes closed, the other the mouth and the last the ears) and I too strongly feel that Armenians(especially in the Diaspora) are perfectly represented by those 3 monkeys. We never see anything wrong, We don't talk about our dirty laundry and we never hear the negative aspects of our selves.

I am glad you are exposing them and I hope you get a huge turnout.

#7 MJ

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Posted 01 March 2003 - 02:57 PM

Thanks, Azat.

I don't think that there will be a huge turnaround, however. It is on Monday, it is going to be a cold day, and I have come up with the idea at noon on Friday. It was a short notice for gathering people. However, the quantity is not going to do much, here. If let's assume we get 100,000 vs. 100 people, what is it going to change?

We will be able to deliver our message and break the silence. I hope we will start the chain reaction. ARF is not going to do it for obvious reasons, Ramgavars are in hiding so that not to be labeled as “interfering in Armenia’s internal affairs,” Assembly is trying to maneuver its way out, and so on. Someone has to do it.

As I have mentioned before, I have not participated in the Armenian political life for more than 12 years, now, and have not made any statements.

The only reason I am coming forward now is my deep conviction that this is the deepest crisis in Armenia since the Declaration of Independence.

In the Soviet times, my friends and me have been subjected to police, KGB and other harassment and persecution (more my friends than me). However, I have never witnessed such an unprecedented and outright terror. KGB and the Soviet Police had rules in our times. What the people in Armenia are facing now is an outright mob, which has taken over the state structures. They are much more outrageous.

I have also witnessed and am informed about rigged votes and stolen elections in Armenia in Soviet and post-Soviet periods. What we witness now far exceeds in its scale and handwriting anything that I am aware of.

Also, I can guarantee you that if the election is won by Kocharyan after all that has evolved so far, the Armenian economy is going to go sharply down, with absolutely zero perspective for any investments and any growth.

Finally, to clarify certain things, I need to report to you that I have no interest in speaking in favor of one candidate vs. another. I don't care who gets elected in fair elections - it is up to the Electorate of Armenia. However, I do deeply care about free and fair elections in Armenia, since its alternative is misery for my nation. After all, every nation gets the leadership she deserves. However, the Armenian nation does not deserve Kocharyan, nor Serjik, nor Shvo, Gvo, Schmise, Muk - you name it. I think we can do better than that.

#8 Sasun

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Posted 01 March 2003 - 07:19 PM

quote:
Originally posted by Azat:
Sasun, consulate officials(diplomats) are just an arm of the government. Where else can a Diaspora member protest?

I understand that they are part of the present authorities but they are mostly viewed as representatives of Armenia as a whole. They represent our country not just Kocharian.

Diaspora Armenians can protest in other ways. How about writing a letter to the Armenian consulate, or to Kocharian; or using mass media to express your protest, or other more civil and less "ambokhain"/revolutionary ways. Besides, has Diaspora solved the Diaspora problems? Let them solve those problems first then protest against Armenia.

I am also concerned about free and fair elections in Armenia but I find demonstrating in America an inappropriate way.

#9 MJ

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Posted 01 March 2003 - 07:39 PM

quote:
Originally posted by Sasun:
[QUOTE]I am also concerned about free and fair elections in Armenia but I find demonstrating in America an inappropriate way.

Fine. So, you don't demonstrate.

For those who might be confused about this demonstration, it does not have a purpose of antagonizing or insulting the personnel of the Mission. These people are honorable and intelligent people, they just happen to represent crooks and bandits terrorizing Armenia.

The demonstration in front of the Mission is a way of expressing solidarity with our compatriots who are holding high the torch of freedom in Armenia, and is our way of having the Mission representatives to deliver our message to the government of Armenia. It is the only mean we have at our disposal at this time, given the lack of time till March the 5th.

Demonstration will be our first step. We will continue our pressure on the current government of Armenia until the usurpators resign.

#10 alpha

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Posted 01 March 2003 - 09:07 PM

MJ,
There was a short lived sense of optimism in people when Ter-Petrossian resigned in 98. People felt that it would mark an end of clannishness and corruption. Alas, they were greatly mistaken. What it turnout out to be was merely an internal coup. What has changed nothing? Absolutely nothing!! In fact many senior members of Ter-Petrossian’s administration, Andranik Manukyan, Serje Sarkisian, Zedoyan, and others continued on holding to their positions. What we see in Armenia now is demonstration of people’s anger, but unfortunately it is not led by new and healthy forces, but corrupt revanchists with shady pasts. It’s not a revolution as many HZhK members would like us to see, but simply clan warfare. What’s rotten in Armenia is the whole political culture. One regime will topple another and nothing will change unless the attitude of political elites changes. Many supporters of Demirchian’s campaign who now cry about ballot staffing, namely Albert Bazeyan, were the ones staffing ballots in 98 for Kocharian. Once he was relieved from the post of Mayor of Yerevan he morphed into a staunch democrat and protector of human rights. I don’t have a solution of crisis of political culture in Armenia, however I don’t think that it’s a noble deed to play with people’s emotions and anger. It was done once in 88 and we saw what were the results of that (1/3 of Armenian population left the country). Demirchian has a fairly clean past, just because he has not been part of the culture. However some people that surround him are not the noblest of people (Aram Sarkissian and Albert Bazeyan are the ones that come to my mind). These are the guys that could do something but did absolutely nothing when late Vazgen Sarkissian shamelessly said in ’96, “if Ter-Petrossian gets even one vote he will still become the president”. That was like spitting on people’s face. People’s leader of that time, Vazgen Manukyan, was weak and people were forced to clean the spit from their face. (mass arrests and beatings are not so new in Armenia) Do you think Demirchian has enough political capital to cleanse the remnants of regime if he wins the elections? As we say in Armenian “Atori kriv a, isk verjum eli joghvurdn a tujvum”.

#11 MJ

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Posted 01 March 2003 - 10:47 PM

Alpha,

Much like you, I also shared (with limited enthusiasm, though) the short-lived optimism in 96 (though not in 98). However, not because I thought the end of corruption had arrived to Armenian – I am too well familiar with the playing field there.

One of the greatest misrepresentations of the time was that Der-Bedrosian’s clan (by the way Der-Bedrosyan was the most positive representative of that clan) was replaced. In fact, one wing of Der-Bedrosyans’ clan was replaced by another wing of his clan – only this time, the less educated and the more merciless. When we speak of Der-Bedrosyan’s clan, I think this is where we have to start from. Otherwise, the separation of Kocharayan from Der-Bedrosyan is ridiculous. Kocharyan is Der-Bedrosyan most loyal pupil.

I can well recognize some of the names who you call revanchists. Those, who I believe you call such, are on this side of the fence only for one reason – they hold Kocharyan responsible for the assasination of their leader – Vazgen Sarkisyan, who is considered to be an Armenian hero (he has never been my hero, btw.) You particularly mention Aram Sarkisyan’s and Albert Bezeyan’s names. Both are leaders of the once Yergrabah Union. I have never appreciated military units turned into political organizations. In 1996, together with Vazgen Sarkisyan, they stole the Republican Party from the genuine Republicans due to the late Republican leader’s poor health. None of those who have established the Republican Party with Ashot Navasardyan, are active with the party or alive, anymore. Those who are alive have the bitter feeling that the genuine and once crystal clean organization has been hijacked. The Republican Party, which was established in 1990 had its core the so-called “angakhagans.”

Much of the first part of your arguments is accurate, except the one associated with Vazgen Manukyan. He is also a representative of the same clan mentioned above. One still can argue whether it has to be called "Der-Bedrosyan clan" or "Vazgen Manukyan" clan. But this is off the topic. This is why Manukyan is unable to gurner adequate support in any elections.

About Demirchyan… As I have mentioned before, he is the only person on the field that I don’t know, personally. From those who I know well and trust, I hear only positive things about him. All the negative things about him, including those in your material above, can be qualified as “guilt by association.” I haven’t heard anyone yet to provide one serious argument against him or the people who he represents. Some say, “he has no program.” From what I have heard and seen, he has a solid program, and he has sufficiently well articulated it. What I hear, however, he is at unease with the microphone and lacks oratorical qualities. The gift of public speech is not given to everyone, however many can learn it. He will do so, I think. However, as one can notice, Kocharyan still has not learned it. He still needs to “shoghuli berel,” in his own words, his language, and has to learn to distinguish the official Armenian language from the street language in Karabagh peripheries .

Obviously, currently Albert Bezeyan and Aram Sarkisyan are liabilities for Demirchyan, and this appears to be his guilt. In this regard, few observations have to be made:

1. Aram Sarkisyan was a presidential candidate on his own, and he dropped out of the race at the 11th hour. Then he threw his support behind Demirchyan, who had already emerged as the most formidable opposition candidate;
2. If, whether one likes or not, Albert Bezeyan and Aram Sarkisyan had not thrown their support behind Demirchian, then Demirchian and his supporters would have been literally and ohysically bitten by the Kocharyan clan members like the most helpless dorks in a high school. Demirchian’s support base, the Peoples’ Party, has no capacity to fight against the Kocharyan clan on the street – they don’t have the training of 1988-1991, nor do they have the history of military activities, or the straggle against the Soviet regime, as some others do. I am convinced that this is why Kocharyan clan is most furious against the Yergrabahs … plus, the clear understanding that some in their clan are going to be held responsible for the assassination of Vazgen Sarkisyan;
3. One of the supporting organizations of Demirchayan has become SIM, i e. the Constitution Right Union, under the leadership of Hrant Khachatryan and Haik Babukhanian. Of all early political forces of Armenia, this organization is the only one which has preserved its original purity and its principal stance on the issues. They are the true heroes of today’s resistance. Note that it is Haik Babukhanian, who symbolizes the current resistance against the criminal clan of Kocharyan, since he did not get intimidated while being attacked by the mob representing Kocharyan during the campaign, and with his supporters stood firm even when being stubbed by the mob. Haik demonstrated that the people can stand up and not to be afraid of the bandits. Untill than, the ordinary people where scared of the mob all over Armenia. Like it or not, the second such person, at the cost of repeating myself, was Aram Sarkisyan. If not these two guys and the people behind them, the resistance would have been dead now – psychologically, morally and, perhaps, physically, and Kocharyan would have safely eliminated Demirchyan and his supporters.

Now, again, from everything that is apparent, Demirchyan and his base do not have the negative legacy of the past. At least I haven’t seen anyone to make such allegation. This is a very positive thing in Armenia in our days. We can only make guesses as what will happen when or if he comes to power. I don’t know. It is going to be a very difficult process. As I have mentioned once (in this forum), Armenia is going through a severe “post-Vietnam” syndrome. It takes time to get rid of it. Obviously, it requires also determination, and emergence of new people. It is time for new people to take over the process in Armenia. Apparently, Demirchyan's base consists, largely, from new people.

Moreover, one thing is apparent. Demicrchyan is the chosen candidate of the overwhelming majority of the Armenian Electorate. Will he manage to bring together a good administration, under the relevant circumstances? I would like to hope so, and I would want to thing that he would be under tremendous pressure from all healthy sides to do so.

In any case, it is not my place to campaign for him, so I would like to end my speech, here.

[ March 02, 2003, 12:35 AM: Message edited by: MJ ]

#12 ARR

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Posted 02 March 2003 - 12:47 PM

Posted Image
I wish MJ you will be alone on your protest. Or for the company join Azeries they dislike Kocharian too because he kicked their behind well, got rib of HHSh that was ready to sign a pro Azeri peace agreement on Artsakh, and finally in full blockade under his "regime" Armenia saw economic growth!

P.S. Armenia is a developing, newly independent country, without democratic past, it is going to take some time (10-20 years) to have flawless election in there. People still have old Soviet mentality, generations have to change and be educated to democracy. Frankly, son of ex-Soviet leader that grew up eating caviar and got used to kick backs, favors, and "magharich" during his dad's rule, would not make Armenia democratic.

Could you please tell when the last time you were in Armenia?

[ March 02, 2003, 01:02 AM: Message edited by: ARR ]

#13 Raffi the Illuminator

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Posted 02 March 2003 - 10:57 AM

I'm not quite sure what the problem is here. I think it's wonderful that someone is setting up a political/social protest for free and fair elections in Armenia. I think we need to be objective here and realize that we need to stop looking at certain Armenian issues such as this one with "rose coloured glasses". Should we only protest when we are trying to make Turkey and Azerbaijan's reputation look bad but ignore some of the problems in Armenia? Even though Turkey has a deplorable human rights record and suppresses freedom of speech and freedom of expression, Armenia sadly, although it pales in comparison, also violates some rights and freedoms according to human and civil rights organizations. It is not enough to only protest against other nations such as Turkey and Azerbaijan with regard to "ethnic cleansing" and Genocide recognition. In fact, I think a protest such as this shows that Armenians are willing to also direct criticism toward the government in Armenia thus making them appear more objective and fair. The fact that they are not occuring on Armenia's soil seems irrelevent to me. I agree that this sort of display shows solidarity with fellow Armenians in their homeland as well as from around the globe. We need to be more objective and fair. This ironically is what Turkish organizations criticize Turkish human rights and political activists for as well. (ie. you are making us look "bad".)

#14 MJ

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Posted 02 March 2003 - 11:25 AM

Raffi,

One comment that I would like to make w.r.t. your material above is that Turks have established a process of free and fair election in Turkey.

Apparently, we are in the same category with Azerbaijan, as the demonstrated by the events of the latest period.

#15 THOTH

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Posted 02 March 2003 - 01:21 PM

Good for you MJ. If there were a similar event here in DC I would certainly attend (however its too short notice and my contacts insufficient to organize such...)

We will watch for you on the news...or at least on Groong! LOL

Really though - I share and understand your anger. I fail to understand those who criticise this planned action of yours yet accept what has occured with the politics and leadership in Armenia. Shame.

#16 Raffi the Illuminator

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Posted 02 March 2003 - 01:44 PM

quote:
Originally posted by MJ:
Raffi,

One comment that I would like to make w.r.t. your material above is that Turks have established a process of free and fair election in Turkey.

Apparently, we are in the same category with Azerbaijan, as the demonstrated by the events of the latest period.

Good point. This is sad but true.

#17 Sasun

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Posted 02 March 2003 - 08:43 PM

I don't think anyone is against free elections or accepts the current government without reservations. We all want Armenia to succeed. The fact is, the development process is painful and difficult. Democracy doesn't come overnight, and poor people cannot build democracy. Most people in Armenia are worried more about vital things like job, basic money, etc. than about politics and elections. You demonstrate as much as you want but that doesn't help. First one needs to feed people. I think this is what Kocharian government has been trying to achieve keeping a limited level of democracy. Deomocracy in Armenia will be limited as long as the majority of people are preoccupied with other things than democracy.
Give me an example of a country that had a solid democracy before it was economically developed. The economy takes precedence over democracy. That has objective reasons and no government can change it.
If those demonstrators in Yerevan had constantly made efforts through other means then we would have free elections today. Right now what is happening is people are acting emotionally out of inpatience, desperation and anger. Yet 99% of people are the ones who have contributed to corruption and are themselves corrupt in one way or another.
The change should come from the grassroots and should be gradual. People should be constantly demanding democracy from the authorities, not do what is happening right now, sleep for 5 years and wake up at the time of elections, get angry, yell without thinking, and go back to sleep for another 5 years without achieving anything. We are these people weather we like it or not.

No president can make Armenia a free and fair country unless the people really want it in actions and not wishes and dreams.

#18 MJ

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Posted 04 March 2003 - 12:15 AM

OK. It is time to go.

The following material has already been distributed through various Channels of mass media and has been submitted to the government of Armenia:

It is Time for Mr. Kocharyan to Go!

We are outraged by the massive scale of vote rigging and widespread repressions, by the violations of Human Rights and Human Dignity in the 2003 Presidential Elections in the Republic of Armenia.

The fact that these elections have been conducted with significant violations has already been recognized by the observers of the OSCE and confirmed by John M. Ordway, the Ambassador of USA in Armenia, among others. However, we believe their declarations do not provide necessary details or insights into the scale and depth of violations, which according to eyewitness accounts are overwhelming.

Three types of massive violations associated with the entire electoral process have been reported so far in the Republic of Armenia:

1. Pre-election violations

The opposition candidates have been put in a disproportionately disadvantageous position at the start of the electoral campaign by not being provided with equal access to mass media, which is contrary to the electoral code of the Republic of Armenia. It is also worthwhile to mention that the only TV Channel not controlled by the State – the A1Plus - has been shut down since April 2002, and its re-registration has been delayed despite the numerous promises of the corresponding state structures to activate the channel prior to the election campaign. Additionally, a number of the highest level state employees - including state ministers - have systematically campaigned for the incumbent president. This is also contrary to the electoral code of the Republic of Armenia.

2. Election-day violations

It has been registered by the proxies of the opposition candidates that some of the widespread mechanisms of vote manipulation and falsification process include: ballot stuffing, inaccurate counting of the votes, misattribution of votes cast in favor of the opposition party to the incumbent president, lack of transparency of the counting, removal of the registered trustees of the opposition candidates from the monitoring of the counting process, intimidation and beating of the voters by local criminal groups and pressure by the heads of local police stations. These facts are also confirmed by the international observers.

It has also become public knowledge, among other things, that the alleged number of the participated voters significantly exceeds the number of eligible voters in the Republic of Armenia. (see, for example, the February 24th “Lessons of Political Mathematics” by the Political Analyst of the independent local Armenian News Agency Noyan Tapan)

3. Post-election violations

In the wake of the observed election-day violations, significant numbers of voters--by some accounts in excess of 100,000 people - have participated in a number of peaceful rallies and demonstrations in Yerevan, the capital of the Republic of Armenia, to exercise their most basic Human Right of free speech, as well as to express their indignation with the vote manipulation that they had observed on Election Day. These rallies and demonstrations have been conducted in an orderly manner without any incident or violence. However, according to preliminary information, about 200 participants of the rally – most notably key figures of the opposition party’s electoral campaign - have been arrested and detained for a period of up to 15 days. The arrests are baseless and limit the means of the primary opposition candidate to effectively organize his run-off campaign.

Additionally, on February 22nd, the Defense Ministry of the Republic of Armenia has declared the potential use of the Army. As the head of the Defense Ministry is also the head of the incumbent president’s Electoral Campaign, this declaration is clearly made to intimidate and psychologically suppress the free will of the voters on the day of run-off elections, March 5th, 2003.

Yet, this list is far from complete, and reports of violations are emerging on a daily basis. The Constitution of the Republic of Armenia is currently paralyzed.

The Republic of Armenia is a striving democracy. More importantly, the Republic is the only device which can preserve, enhance and advance the Armenian Nation. Additionally, Armenia is one of the functional anchors for regional stability as well as free-market economy in the entire Caucasian and Middle East regions. She has an important stabilizing role to play there - especially in such volatile times. Moreover, the people of the Republic of Armenia deserve democracy and an atmosphere of respect for Human Rights and Human Dignity. Furthermore, their active participation in the February 19 elections, as well as their civilized manner of expressing their indignation against the blatant election-day violations attest to the fact that they are also ripe for democracy.

The Republic of Armenia has been a recipient of significant financial and other US and European aid, World Bank and IMF loans. With the current situation, we should recognize that the economic future of Armenia and her overall investment climate has never been so bleak and the outlook so grim.

All of us who are concerned about the future of the Republic of Armenia, those of us who have aspirations for her future, those of us who care about Democracy, Human Rights and Human Dignity everywhere, should not and cannot be indifferent to the plight of the citizens of the Republic, who are in a struggle to uphold and restore their violated civil rights and dignity.

While not having any preferences towards any of the candidates, and recognizing that the fair and proper election of the Presidency of Armenia is the prerogative of the Armenian Electorate, we urge all Armenians, all friends of Armenia and all champions of Democracy to raise their voice in defense of the free and fair Electoral Right of the Electors of the Republic of Armenia.

Therefore,

• I urge all Human Rights organizations to stand up for the unalienable rights of the Armenian Electorate.

• I urge the Governments of the Free World to give proper assessment to the ramifications of falsified elections on the whole region, and the consequences of silence or implied assent.

• I urge the Armenian Diaspora to recognize that its stance towards the most serious political process in Armenia since her Declaration of Independence is a test of the relevance of the Diaspora for the future of Armenian Nation, and to act accordingly.

• I urge the people of Armenia and all who share this feeling, to claim ownership of their homeland and to stand firm against these unfortunate and unprecedented violations, to stand up against the stripping of their basic Human Rights and Dignity, and to uphold the rights which are clearly granted to them by the Constitution of the Republic of Armenia.

• I urge the Law Enforcement agencies and the Judicial Branch of Power of the Republic of Armenia to release from detention all the activists of opposition. They should remember that the Republic of Armenia was born in similar peaceful rallies and demonstrations of protest, and these are among the best traditions of the expression of Free Will by the Armenian Nation. Detentions of and reprisals against demonstrators are contrary to the very foundations of the Republic.

• I urge Mr. Kocharyan, the President of the Republic of Armenia, to resign from his post. Regardless of the development of the events in Armenia in the nearest future, regardless of the outcome of the run-off elections if in fact they are held, Mr. Kocharyan cannot and should not continue to lead Armenia. His credibility as the guarantor of the Constitution of Armenia, as the guarantor of the political and economic stability of Armenia, as the guarantor of the positive outlook for the future of Armenia, has been absolutely and irreversibly destroyed.

• In the spirit of the traditions established by the founders of the Republican Party, I urge the Republican Party of Armenia - especially the Prime Minister of the Republic, Mr. Andranik Margaryan, to undertake one more time the role of the guarantors of a stable political transition in the tense political atmosphere of Armenia. I urge them to exercise their influence to expedite the resignation of the current President. I urge the Prime Minister to assume the interim leadership of the country, and to take on the responsibility for organizing new, free and fair elections in Armenia in a timely manner.

It is time to recognize the newly emerged realities and to properly assess their ramifications. It is time to speak up for Human Rights, Human Dignity and Democracy in the Republic of Armenia.

The delay to raise our voice is pregnant with the reality of elimination of any opposition in Armenia – both politically and physically.

On behalf of the Committee for Free and Fair Elections in Armenia,

M. J.
Founding Member of the Republican Party of Armenia
26-28 February, 2003
New York, NY

#19 vava

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Posted 03 March 2003 - 01:48 PM

Barev Martin,

quote:
Originally posted by MJ:
All of us who are concerned about the future of the Republic of Armenia, those of us who have aspirations for her future, those of us who care about Democracy, Human Rights and Human Dignity everywhere, should not and cannot be indifferent to the plight of the citizens of the Republic, who are in a struggle to uphold and restore their violated civil rights and dignity.

While not having any preferences towards any of the candidates, and recognizing that the fair and proper election of the Presidency of Armenia is the prerogative of the Armenian Electorate, we urge all Armenians, all friends of Armenia and all champions of Democracy to raise their voice in defense of the free and fair Electoral Right of the Electors of the Republic of Armenia.

Consider my voice raised! I'm sorry that I cannot join your protest in NY. We need more action-oriented politics, and less two-faced rhetoric. Good luck to you.

[ March 04, 2003, 02:28 PM: Message edited by: vava ]

#20 MosJan

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Posted 03 March 2003 - 09:44 PM

LA nuynpes tsuytser yeran - rekavarutyamb Yuri VArdanyani
mi amborj kesor tsuyts en arel - arden 3 jam e TV tsuyts e talis
jishte shat ban cher haskatsvum - Yurikn el himnakanum kardum er ir yeluyt@. bavakanin tsutsararner kayin - de hiimnakanum Tatik papikner@ - motaka DayLight Manka-PapikTatik-A-Partezits - nuynisk irents Dayaknerin eyin berel, te Dayaknern eyin irents berel.
hameniyn deps mut gortsa - nichistaya !!!

Martin yete Demirjyan@ @entrvi du het HAyastan k@gnas ??? mhtakan bnakutyan ???

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