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Poll: Is the U.S. going to invade Iran

Is the U.S. going to invade Iran

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#81 elle

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Posted 06 February 2008 - 09:20 PM

Azerbaijan: Newspaper Editor sentenced over article about possible US attack on Iran

Global Research, November 1, 2007
Pravda

Editor sentenced over article about possible US attack on Iran

30.10.2007 Pravda. Source Associated Press

Eynulla Fatullayev, an Azerbaijani newspaper editor was sentenced to 8½ years in prison. He sent to the press an article asserting that the ex-Soviet nation could support a U.S. attack on neighboring Iran.

The Court for Grave Crimes convicted Eynulla Fatullayev, the founder and editor of the Russian-language weekly Real Azerbaijan and the Azeri-language daily Everyday Azerbaijan, on charges of making a terrorist threat and inciting interethnic conflict.

Fatullayev denounced the court's verdict as politically driven. "That's evidence of political pressure on me as a journalist," he said.

Fatullayev's case is the latest in a series of prosecutions of independent media figures in the oil-rich Caspian Sea nation that have raised concerns in the West.

The charges against Fatullayev were filed in response to the article in Real Azerbaijan which claimed that Azerbaijan's President Ilham Aliev could support a U.S. military action against Iran.

The article, written under an alias, listed sites in Azerbaijan that could be attacked by Iran if Baku were to support Washington in the event of military action against Iran.

Aliev's government has cultivated close ties with Washington and contributed troops to the U.S.-led coalition in Iraq, and charges against Fatullayev reflected official concerns about angering Iran.

Tehran has feared a U.S. attack and threatened to strike back at any country that cooperates with it. The Azerbaijan government has pledged its territory won't be used for military action against Iran, but people living along the border were nervous, pointing to a U.S.-built radar facility and the upgrading of an airport near the border with Iran. Both projects are U.S.-financed.

Both Fatullayev's newspapers were forced to suspend publication in the spring after authorities had evicted them from their offices.

Fatullayev has been in prison since April when he was sentenced to 2½ years in prison on charges of disseminating false information related to the country's six-year war with Armenia over the territory of Nagorno-Karabakh.

Previously, Fatullayev had received a two-year suspended sentence for libeling a top law enforcement official.

Aliev, who took over from his father in a 2003 election denounced by opponents as a sham, has faced persistent criticism over the heavy-handed treatment of independent media and opposition parties.



#82 robertik1

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Posted 12 February 2008 - 02:46 PM

Thats why Im hoping they do invade Iran from Azerbaijan. Sit and watch the fireworks. smile.gif

#83 Ashot

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Posted 12 February 2008 - 03:32 PM

Rob jan, they can't invade Iran, as of today Russia has a pact signed with Iran... and if America goes as much as to the border of Iran, the hell will be unleashed, and unfortunately we can't stand there and watch the firewors, we would be involved deeper into the mess then you think!!!

#84 robertik1

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Posted 12 February 2008 - 03:50 PM

You know bush. Got to prepare for the worst. So what should we do?

#85 garmag

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Posted 12 February 2008 - 04:55 PM

QUOTE (robertik1 @ Feb 12 2008, 03:50 PM)
You know bush. Got to prepare for the worst. So what should we do?



Do you think this is a compu-game that after the fire works, we can just start again without any FINITE RESULTS?



#86 robertik1

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Posted 12 February 2008 - 05:12 PM

QUOTE (garmag @ Feb 12 2008, 04:55 PM)
Do you think this is a compu-game that after the fire works, we can just start again without any FINITE RESULTS?


well, sorry for asking. mad.gif

#87 Ashot

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Posted 12 February 2008 - 06:02 PM

Garmag, actually yes, they have made it into compu-game... they sit in here with bunch of weapons, military personell, and rockets - infront of the computers they monitor everything, and it is actually a simulation - so they are playing a game...

#88 garmag

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Posted 12 February 2008 - 07:54 PM

QUOTE (Ashot @ Feb 12 2008, 07:02 PM)
Garmag, actually yes, they have made it into compu-game... they sit in here with bunch of weapons, military personell, and rockets - infront of the computers they monitor everything, and it is actually a simulation - so they are playing a game...


Ashot,
I am fully aware about the super secret sites where the Empires are playing, simulated scenarios about WHAT IF CONFRONTATION GAMES on a global scale.
Even with the latest tech-games, they still manage to SCREW UP. Exemples abound, Afghanistan.....Iraq.....Ira.....?

Imagine China loosing 300 million pawns, can the entire Western powers loose 100 million pawns and still be viable?
Unthinkable yet probable scenario.....

So called Civilization has brought us faster means to annahilate each other.
I am a realist/optimist, if such an animal can exist, carrying on and hoping that the globe will survive the humans.



#89 robertik1

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Posted 12 February 2008 - 11:23 PM

Im sorry for being mean. Everyone have a nice day.

#90 Ashot

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Posted 16 February 2008 - 05:35 AM

4.2 magnitude earthquake in Iran

Today at 11:04 a.m. a magnitude 4.2 earthquake was registered on the territory of Iran, 35 km to the southwest of Serend city. The strength reached 6-7 at the epicenter, Armenpress was informed form the National Survey for Seismic Protection of Armenia.

#91 Takoush

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Posted 19 February 2008 - 10:16 AM

Three years ago one of my professors said that this country (USA)'s governments are screwed up in many ways. He said instead of searching and making the people pay so much money every day for gasoline, why can't we invest some money to create Hybrid cars. He said it's out there yet they don't pursue it and they buy expensive gasoline from abroad; sometimes make wars for it, yet they still don't pursue creating those Hybrid cars that can be run with water. huh.gif It's crazy he said and he is right.

#92 Ashot

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Posted 05 March 2008 - 01:22 AM

No military action against Iran: Russia

Western powers have triumphed at the UN Security Council, pushing through a third set of sanctions on Iran. However, they were forced to drop their bid for another resolution against the Islamic Republic. Britain, France and Germany had proposed a resolution at the IAEA which would have required Iran to allow inspectors greater access to its nuclear programme. The proposal was rejected by both Russia and China.

Russia and China claimed that more pressure on Tehran could provoke a resentful Iran to decrease its co-operation with the nuclear watchdog.

Russia's Ambassador to the UN, Vitaly Churkin, also emphasised that any measures taken against Iran on this issue will exclude military action.

“This resolution was adopted in accordance with article 41, chapter 7 of the UN Charter. Moreover, if Iran doesn’t agree with the demand to halt the enrichment process and additional measures are required, it foresees that the Security Council will continue to work exclusively in the framework of article 41. Given this, any suggestion is excluded that the Security Council could approve the use of force against Iran, because we stand firm that the solution to the Iranian issue can only be found through policy and diplomacy,” Churkin said.


UN Security Council vote

Members of the United Nations Security Council have sent a clear message to Iran. A 14-0 vote cleared the way for a third round of sanctions against Iran, despite Indonesia's abstention.

The mounting pressure comes as Tehran continues to defy previous Security Council resolutions by refusing to suspend uranium enrichment. Iran insists its enrichment activities are intended only for peaceful civilian purposes, others suspect its real aim is to produce atomic weapons.

The resolution was co-sponsored by Britain, France and Germany.

However, Iran's UN Ambassador Mohammad Khazee addressing the Council before the vote said his government would not comply with what he called an unlawful action against its peaceful nuclear programme.

"The credibility of the Security Council, whose primary responsibility is to maintain international peace and security, is readily downgraded to a mere tool of the national foreign policy of just a few countries, " he said.

Russian Ambassador and current Security Council President Vitaly Churkin expressed the hope that the Iranians will now move to resolve the outstanding contentious issues.

"Unfortunately, the statement by the Iranian Ambassador was not what we hoping for. However, we believe that after they in Iran have had a chance to hear the statements of the members of the Security Council and, equally important, hear the statement of six Foreign Ministers, they will reflect on the current situation and things will change," he said.

For the first time, the resolution calls for a ban on the trade and supply of “dual-use” goods, materials and technology that can be adapted for military as well as civilian purposes.

It also authorises inspection of air and sea shipments to and from Iran that are suspected of carrying banned items.

In additon, it's introducing the financial monitoring of two banks with suspected links to proliferation activities, and is also imposing a travel ban on five individuals linked to Iran’s nuclear effort.

The resolution also orders countries to freeze the assets of 12 additional companies and 13 individuals with links to Iran’s nuclear or ballistic missile programmes.

One thing it won't affect is the Bushehr nuclear plant being built by Russia in Iran, which is to provide domestic power in the country.

On the very same day that more sanctions were imposed on Iran, additional pressure comes from the IAEA. The nuclear watchdog called for Iran to co-operate with an investigation over new intelligence suggesting the country sought to adapt nuclear material for military purposes. The international community says only more transparency will resolve this matter for serious concern.

Russia Today

#93 Ashot

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Posted 16 March 2008 - 01:46 AM

Two Armenians running for Iranian Parliament
14.03.2008 17:07

Elections of the Islamic Parliament of 8th convocation are held in Iran today. According to the Constitution of the Islamic Republic of Iran, the Armenian community can have two Deputies in the Islamic Parliament.

Tehran based “Alik” daily reports that the candidate form Tehran and northern Iranian Armenians is Gevorg Vardan. Robert Beglaryan represents Spahan and southern Iranian Armenians. It should be noted that both candidates presented the interests of Iranian Armenians in the previous Parliament.

The Armenian organizations off Iran have urged their compatriots to actively participate in the elections, since “the parentage of participation is important for the further activity of the Member of Parliament.”

Public Radio of Armenia

#94 Ashot

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Posted 16 March 2008 - 01:54 AM

Ahmadinejad allies ahead in Iran’s vote
Preliminary results show that hardline allies of President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad are ahead in Iran's parliamentary election. The vote was widely regarded as a test of the president's popularity, and 70 per cent of voters showed support for his policies.

But how do ordinary Iranians view the election and what might it bring?

After Iran went to the polls, the people of Tehran continue to go about their business.

Conservatives who largely support Mahmoud Ahmadinejad are set to retain control in Parliament. Although official results have not been announced yet and there has been a strong showing by Ahmidinijad's critics, the hard-line conservatives are well ahead.

While this is the stuff of high politics, the average person in the street is concerned about what affect the election will have on Iran and its relationship with the West.

Mahmoud Tavakolian, the owner of a leather shop in the heart of Tehran, says in the old days, when more foreigners visited the country, business was better. But now he suffers because of the western perception of his country. He thinks if Iran and western countries came to more of an understanding, it would be better for everybody.

“Years ago, when there were many tourists coming to our country, business was very good. Nobody likes living under sanctions. But under what condition should we compromise? If we have to give up our will, then we don’t want to pay the price," he says.

Mahmoud believes the west needs to recognise Iran's progress.

Indeed, already the government is wasting no time in making it clear it will stick to its tough line. Tehran has said “no” to further talks on the Iranian nuclear programme with the 'five plus one' negotiating states – the permanent members of the UN Security Council plus Germany.

Iran names the recent third set of UN Security Council sanctions as the reason for putting an end to talks. But some say this kind of conflict with the west only makes Iran all the more determined.

"Even though economic sanctions have a serious impact, it's just a push that will make Iran stronger," political analyst Amir Ahmadiyan believes.

Others say the relationship is mutually dependent.

"War is impossible at the moment, considering the mutual interests of both sides. But threatening each other will have a great price for all sides involved," another political expert, Hossein Ruyvaran, thinks.

And for many common people the controversial nuclear programme is a matter of national pride.

In the meantime Iranians are waiting for the next steps of their new parliament.

Friday's election brought no surprises – both for analysts and the average Iranian. In Tehran people are convinced that for now policies will stay the same. And while many say a better relationship with the West would be good for the country, those in power seem to continue to stick to their hardline policies.


#95 elle

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Posted 19 March 2008 - 01:39 PM

Beware an Attack on Iran


By Prof. Marjorie Cohn
Global Research, March 17, 2008


Is the Bush administration ramping up for an attack on Iran? The signs seem to point in that direction. On March 11, Navy Adm. William Fallon, commander of the U.S. forces in the Middle East, retired early because of differences with Washington on Iran policy. And now, Dick Cheney's current Middle East tour may be designed to prepare our Arab allies for an imminent "preemptive" war against Iran.

Bush and Cheney have long been rattling the sabers in Iran's direction. The disaster they created in Iraq isn't going well, no matter how they spin it. They may feel that engaging the United States militarily in Iran would make it harder to elect anyone other than the seasoned military man, John McCain. The Republican presidential candidate just happens to be touring Iraq with Sen. Joe Lieberman, one of the strongest advocates of a U.S. military strike on Iran. Lieberman is likely on McCain's short list for a vice-presidential running mate.

Admiral Fallon took early retirement after making comments that contradicted the Bush administration's aggressive stance on Iran. Fallon told the Arab television station Al Jazeera last fall that a "constant drumbeat of conflict" from the administration against Iran was "not helpful and not useful." After Fallon announced his retirement, the New York Times reported a senior administration official as saying Fallon's comments about U.S. Iran policy "left the perception he had a different foreign policy than the president." If Fallon wants to talk to Iran rather than attack it, then his policy differs from Bush's.

Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Adm. Mike Mullen, however, has downplayed the significance of Admiral Fallon's abrupt retirement. Admiral Miller proclaimed recently, "In my view, this should not be seen as a sign – at all – towards any kind of conflict with Iran." Perhaps the chairman doth protest too much.

The White House has been spewing pugilistic rhetoric toward Iran. In spite of the unanimous conclusion of the 16 U.S. intelligence agencies that Iran is not developing nukes, Bush immediately declared, "I have said Iran is dangerous, and the NIE estimate doesn't do anything to change my opinion about the danger Iran poses to the world - quite the contrary."

News reports on Monday announced that Dick Cheney is on a surprise weeklong visit to Iraq, Israel, the occupied Palestinian territories, Saudi Arabia, Oman and Turkey. High on Cheney's agenda is the topic of U.S. policy toward Iran.

Connect the dots. They paint a very frightening picture.




#96 elle

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Posted 19 March 2008 - 01:45 PM

6 Signs the U.S. May Be Headed for War in Iran
by Terry Atlas
Global Research, March 12, 2008

This report by the US mainstream press suggests in no uncertain terms that the US is heading for war with Iran and that opposition within the US high command has been significantly weakened with the forced resignation of Admiral William Fallon.
Is the United States moving toward military action with Iran?
The resignation of the top U.S. military commander for the Middle East is setting off alarms that the Bush administration is intent on using military force to stop Iran's moves toward gaining nuclear weapons. In announcing his sudden resignation today following a report on his views in Esquire, Adm. William Fallon didn't directly deny that he differs with President Bush over at least some aspects of the president's policy on Iran. For his part, Defense Secretary Robert Gates said it is "ridiculous" to think that the departure of Fallon -- whose Central Command has been working on contingency plans for strikes on Iran as well as overseeing Iraq -- signals that the United States is planning to go to war with Iran.

Fallon's resignation, ending a 41-year Navy career, has reignited the buzz of speculation over what the Bush administration intends to do given that its troubled, sluggish diplomatic effort has failed to slow Iran's nuclear advances. Those activities include the advancing process of uranium enrichment, a key step to producing the material necessary to fuel a bomb, though the Iranians assert the work is to produce nuclear fuel for civilian power reactors, not weapons.

Here are six developments that may have Iran as a common thread. And, if it comes to war, they may be seen as clues as to what was planned. None of them is conclusive, and each has a credible non-Iran related explanation:

1. Fallon's resignation: With the Army fully engaged in Iraq, much of the contingency planning for possible military action has fallen to the Navy, which has looked at the use of carrier-based warplanes and sea-launched missiles as the weapons to destroy Iran's air defenses and nuclear infrastructure. Centcom commands the U.S. naval forces in and near the Persian Gulf. In the aftermath of the problems with the Iraq war, there has been much discussion within the military that senior military officers should have resigned at the time when they disagreed with the White House.

2. Vice President Cheney's peace trip: Cheney, who is seen as a leading hawk on Iran, is going on what is described as a Mideast trip to try to give a boost to stalled Israeli-Palestinian peace talks. But he has also scheduled two other stops: One, Oman, is a key military ally and logistics hub for military operations in the Persian Gulf. It also faces Iran across the narrow, vital Strait of Hormuz, the vulnerable oil transit chokepoint into and out of the Persian Gulf that Iran has threatened to blockade in the event of war. Cheney is also going to Saudi Arabia, whose support would be sought before any military action given its ability to increase oil supplies if Iran's oil is cut off. Back in March 2002, Cheney made a high-profile Mideast trip to Saudi Arabia and other nations that officials said at the time was about diplomacy toward Iraq and not war, which began a year later.

3. Israeli airstrike on Syria: Israel's airstrike deep in Syria last October was reported to have targeted a nuclear-related facility, but details have remained sketchy and some experts have been skeptical that Syria had a covert nuclear program. An alternative scenario floating in Israel and Lebanon is that the real purpose of the strike was to force Syria to switch on the targeting electronics for newly received Russian anti-aircraft defenses. The location of the strike is seen as on a likely flight path to Iran (also crossing the friendly Kurdish-controlled Northern Iraq), and knowing the electronic signatures of the defensive systems is necessary to reduce the risks for warplanes heading to targets in Iran.

4. Warships off Lebanon: Two U.S. warships took up positions off Lebanon earlier this month, replacing the USS Cole. The deployment was said to signal U.S. concern over the political stalemate in Lebanon and the influence of Syria in that country. But the United States also would want its warships in the eastern Mediterranean in the event of military action against Iran to keep Iranian ally Syria in check and to help provide air cover to Israel against Iranian missile reprisals. One of the newly deployed ships, the USS Ross, is an Aegis guided missile destroyer, a top system for defense against air attacks.

5. Israeli comments: Israeli President Shimon Peres said earlier this month that Israel will not consider unilateral action to stop Iran from getting a nuclear bomb. In the past, though, Israeli officials have quite consistently said they were prepared to act alone -- if that becomes necessary -- to ensure that Iran does not cross a nuclear weapons threshold. Was Peres speaking for himself, or has President Bush given the Israelis an assurance that they won't have to act alone?

6.Israel's war with Hezbollah: While this seems a bit old, Israel's July 2006 war in Lebanon against Iranian-backed Hezbollah forces was seen at the time as a step that Israel would want to take if it anticipated a clash with Iran. The radical Shiite group is seen not only as a threat on it own but also as a possible Iranian surrogate force in the event of war with Iran. So it was important for Israel to push Hezbollah forces back from their positions on Lebanon's border with Israel and to do enough damage to Hezbollah's Iranian-supplied arsenals to reduce its capabilities. Since then, Hezbollah has been able to rearm, though a United Nations force polices a border area buffer zone in southern Lebanon.

Defense Secretary Gates said that Fallon, 63, asked for permission to retire. Gates said that the decision, effective March 31, was entirely Fallon's and that Gates believed it was "the right thing to do." In Esquire, an article on Fallon portrayed him as opposed to President Bush's Iran policy and said he was a lone voice against taking military action to stop the Iranian nuclear program. In his statement, Fallon said he agreed with the president's "policy objectives" but was silent on whether he opposed aspects of the president's plans. "Recent press reports suggesting a disconnect between my views and the president's policy objectives have become a distraction at a critical time and hamper efforts in the Centcom region," Fallon, said in the statement issued by Centcom headquarters in Tampa, Fla. "And although I don't believe there have ever been any differences about the objectives of our policy in the Central Command area of responsibility, the simple perception that there is makes it difficult for me to effectively serve America's interests there," he said. Gates announced that Fallon's top deputy, Army Lt. Gen. Martin Dempsey, will take over temporarily when Fallon leaves. A permanent successor, requiring nomination by the president and confirmation by the Senate, might not be designated in the near term.



#97 elle

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Posted 19 March 2008 - 01:52 PM

Russia and Central Asian Allies Conduct War Games in Response to US Threats
by Michel Chossudovsky

Global Research, August 24, 2006

Barely acknowledged by the Western media, military exercises organized by Russia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan under the Collective Security Treaty Organisation, (CSTO) were launched on the 24th of August. These war games, officially tagged as part of a counter terrorism program, are in direct response to US military threats in the region including the planned attacks against Iran.

The Rubezh-2006 exercise, is scheduled to take place from August 24-29 near the Kazak port city of Aktau:

"It will be the first joint military exercise undertaken by CSTO countries, and will involve 2,500 members drawn from various armed services of member states, with Russia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan the principal participants. Uzbekistan, which has recently rejoined the CSTO, will send observers, while the two other pact members, Belarus and Armenia, will not be taking part .

Press reports from the region describe these war games as a response to US military presence and ambitions in Central Asia:

"The growing militarisation is connected with mutual mistrust among countries in the region, say analysts. Iranian media have speculated that the United States is using Azerbaijan to create a military counterweight to Iran on the Caspian. It is possible that the exercise conducted by the CSTO – in which Russia is dominant – represents a response to concerns about United States involvement in developing Kazakstan’s navy. Observers say Russia is leaning more and more towards the Iranian view that countries from outside should be banned from having armed forces in the Caspian Sea."

Experts say the US is trying to step up the pressure on Iran, as well as to defend its own investments in Azerbaijan and Kazakstan. It is also trying to guarantee the security of the strategically vital Baku-Tbilisi-Ceyhan pipeline.

A military presence on the Caspian would give the United States an opportunity to at least partially offset its weakening influence in Central Asia, as seen in the closure of its airbase in Uzbekistan, the increased rent it is having to pay for the Manas base in Kyrgyzstan, and the diplomatic scandal that resulted in the expulsion of two Americans from Kyrgyzstan.

According to analysts, genuine security in the region can be achieved only if the military interests of all five Caspian countries are coordinated. At an international conference in Astrakhan in July 2005, Russia proposed the formation of a Caspian naval coordination group, but to date the initiative has not had much of a response.(Ibid)

Iran War Games coincide with those organized by the CSTO

The entire region seems to be on a war footing. These CSTO war games should be seen in relation to those launched barely a week earlier by Iran, in response to continued US military threats. These war games coincide with the showdown at the UN Security Council and the negotiations between permanent members regarding a Security Council resolution pertaining to Iran's nuclear program. "They are taking place within the window of time that has been predicted by analysts for the initiation of an American or an American-led attack against Iran" (see Mahdi Darius Nazemroaya, Global Research, 21 August 2006):

"War games and military exercises are now well underway within Iran and its territory. The Iranian Armed Forces—the Regular Armed Forces and the Revolutionary Guards Corps—began the first stage of massive nationwide war games along border areas of the province of Sistan and Baluchistan1 in the southeast of Iran bordering the Gulf of Oman, Pakistan, and NATO garrisoned Afghanistan to the east on Saturday, August 19, 2006. These war games that are underway are to unfold and intensify over a five week period and possibly even last longer, meaning they will continue till the end of September and possibly overlap into October, 2006". (Ibid, emphasis added)

While Iran is not a member of the CSTO, it has observer status in the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO), of which China is a member.

The SCO has a close relationship to the CSTO. The structure of military alliances is crucial. In case of an attack on Iran, Russia and its CSTO allies will not remain neutral. In April, Iran was invited to become a full member of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO).

Sofar no concrete timetable for Iran's accession to the SCO has been set. This enlargement of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization, which also includes observer status for India, Pakistan and Mongolia counters US military and strategic objectives in the broader region. Moreover, China and Russia, which are partners in the SCO also have a longstanding bilateral military cooperation agreement. In August 2005, China and Russia conducted joint militart exercises.

The conduct of the CSTO war games must be seen as a signal to Washington that an attack on Iran could lead to a much broader military conflict in which Russia and the member states of the CSTO could potentially be involved, siding with Iran and Syria.

Also of significance is the structure of bilateral military cooperation agreements. Russia and China are the main suppliers of advanced weapons systems of Iran and Syria. Russia is contemplating the installation of a Navy base in Syria on the eastern Mediterranean coastline. In turn, the US and Israel have military cooperation agreements with Azerbaijan and Georgia.

China War Games

In recent developments, China and Kazakhstan have initiated war games (August 24, 2006) under the auspices of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO). These war games are being held concurrently with those conducted under the CSTO, which are also being held in Kazakhstan.

India-Russia military Cooperation

India and Russia have signed on August 20th, a farreaching military cooperation agreement. Although not officially directed against the US, the purpose of this agreement is understood. The two countries have "agreed to focus on joint war games in services-to-services interaction, joint development of new weapons systems and training of Indian military personnel", (Press Trust of India, 21 August 2006).

Edited by elle, 19 March 2008 - 01:53 PM.


#98 garmag

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Posted 19 March 2008 - 02:49 PM

QUOTE (elle @ Mar 19 2008, 02:45 PM)
6 Signs the U.S. May Be Headed for War in Iran
by Terry Atlas
Global Research, March 12, 2008


Here are six developments that may have Iran as a common thread. And, if it comes to war, they may be seen as clues as to what was planned. None of them is conclusive, and each has a credible non-Iran related explanation:

1. Fallon's resignation: With the Army fully engaged in Iraq, much of the contingency planning for possible military action has fallen to the Navy, which has looked at the use of carrier-based warplanes and sea-launched missiles as the weapons to destroy Iran's air defenses and nuclear infrastructure. Centcom commands the U.S. naval forces in and near the Persian Gulf. In the aftermath of the problems with the Iraq war, there has been much discussion within the military that senior military officers should have resigned at the time when they disagreed with the White House.

2. Vice President Cheney's peace trip: Cheney, who is seen as a leading hawk on Iran, is going on what is described as a Mideast trip to try to give a boost to stalled Israeli-Palestinian peace talks. But he has also scheduled two other stops: One, Oman, is a key military ally and logistics hub for military operations in the Persian Gulf. It also faces Iran across the narrow, vital Strait of Hormuz, the vulnerable oil transit chokepoint into and out of the Persian Gulf that Iran has threatened to blockade in the event of war. Cheney is also going to Saudi Arabia, whose support would be sought before any military action given its ability to increase oil supplies if Iran's oil is cut off. Back in March 2002, Cheney made a high-profile Mideast trip to Saudi Arabia and other nations that officials said at the time was about diplomacy toward Iraq and not war, which began a year later.

3. Israeli airstrike on Syria: Israel's airstrike deep in Syria last October was reported to have targeted a nuclear-related facility, but details have remained sketchy and some experts have been skeptical that Syria had a covert nuclear program. An alternative scenario floating in Israel and Lebanon is that the real purpose of the strike was to force Syria to switch on the targeting electronics for newly received Russian anti-aircraft defenses. The location of the strike is seen as on a likely flight path to Iran (also crossing the friendly Kurdish-controlled Northern Iraq), and knowing the electronic signatures of the defensive systems is necessary to reduce the risks for warplanes heading to targets in Iran.

4. Warships off Lebanon: Two U.S. warships took up positions off Lebanon earlier this month, replacing the USS Cole. The deployment was said to signal U.S. concern over the political stalemate in Lebanon and the influence of Syria in that country. But the United States also would want its warships in the eastern Mediterranean in the event of military action against Iran to keep Iranian ally Syria in check and to help provide air cover to Israel against Iranian missile reprisals. One of the newly deployed ships, the USS Ross, is an Aegis guided missile destroyer, a top system for defense against air attacks.

5. Israeli comments: Israeli President Shimon Peres said earlier this month that Israel will not consider unilateral action to stop Iran from getting a nuclear bomb. In the past, though, Israeli officials have quite consistently said they were prepared to act alone -- if that becomes necessary -- to ensure that Iran does not cross a nuclear weapons threshold. Was Peres speaking for himself, or has President Bush given the Israelis an assurance that they won't have to act alone?

6.Israel's war with Hezbollah: While this seems a bit old, Israel's July 2006 war in Lebanon against Iranian-backed Hezbollah forces was seen at the time as a step that Israel would want to take if it anticipated a clash with Iran. The radical Shiite group is seen not only as a threat on it own but also as a possible Iranian surrogate force in the event of war with Iran. So it was important for Israel to push Hezbollah forces back from their positions on Lebanon's border with Israel and to do enough damage to Hezbollah's Iranian-supplied arsenals to reduce its capabilities. Since then, Hezbollah has been able to rearm, though a United Nations force polices a border area buffer zone in southern Lebanon.


Since we are in the speculation realm add to the above the following points...

-Cheyney will visit Turkey ...given that the AKP Islamic government might nor endorse Iranian adventure. At this time a couple of days ago, the chief procecutor of Turkey is disputing the legitimacy of AKP's rule... Coincidence?

-Turkey has amassed a sizable force in the south west ... supposedly against PKK? The Turkish armed forces are Kemalists, not islamists. Good excuse to occupy Kurdish oil and supress Kurdish aspirations at the same time?

-Condollizza/Gates also visited Turkey then went on to visit Russia? We were told that it was, re missile bases in Turkey...also that the meetings were galcial... was this meeting to feel and inform Russia about south Caucasus situation in case of US intervention in Iran?

-Sidelines, Azery aggression surpassing past skirmishes...Azery oil must be secured?

- Get Armenia in internacine war,... it is a work in process partly achieved... to reduce and overcome effective Russian objections?... Russia will not go to war to protect Armenia! But might want to control Azery oil deal...

- A cowboy at the helm with a guslingers' reputation... he could also adhere to "apres moi le deluge" without consideration for the results of his actions. After all the most remembered people in history are the blood thirsty invaders...

It is with great apprehension and alarm that these speculations are made.
In these dooms' day scenarios anything is possible, Hydra has been planning for armageddon for centuries...

A tilt, like in a pin ball machine... should stop this madness from happening! So we hope.

Edited by garmag, 19 March 2008 - 03:02 PM.


#99 elle

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Posted 19 March 2008 - 03:13 PM

QUOTE (garmag @ Mar 19 2008, 03:49 PM)
Since we are in the speculation realm add to the above the following points...

-Cheyney will visit Turkey ...given that the AKP Islamic government might nor endorse Iranian adventure. At this time a couple of days ago, the chief procecutor of Turkey is disputing the legitimacy of AKP's rule... Coincidence?

-Turkey has amassed a sizable force in the south west ... supposedly against PKK? The Turkish armed forces are Kemalists, not islamists. Good excuse to occupy Kurdish oil and supress Kurdish aspirations at the same time?

-Condollizza/Gates also visited Turkey then went on to visit Russia? We were told that it was, re missile bases in Turkey...also that the meetings were galcial... was this meeting to feel and inform Russia about south Caucasus situation in case of US intervention in Iran?

-Sidelines, Azery aggression surpassing past skirmishes...Azery oil must be secured?

- Get Armenia in internacine war,... it is a work in process partly achieved... to reduce and overcome effective Russian objections?... Russia will not go to war to protect Armenia! But might want to control Azery oil deal...

- A cowboy at the helm with a guslingers' reputation... he could also adhere to "apres moi le deluge" without consideration for the results of his actions. After all the most remembered people in history are the blood thirsty invaders...

It is with great apprehension and alarm that these speculations are made.
In these dooms' day scenarios anything is possible, Hydra has been planning for armageddon for centuries...

A tilt, like in a pin ball machine... should stop this madness from happening! So we hope.



Could you please elaborate on these two points?


#100 garmag

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Posted 19 March 2008 - 03:31 PM

QUOTE (elle @ Mar 19 2008, 04:13 PM)
Could you please elaborate on these two points?


You could read about Rice/Gates visit to Turkey in the Turkish Daily News.
The Russian visit was on CNN and reported by intern. news.

The Azery skirmishes were all over in the Armenian and Azery news. Feeling the gounds of the Armenian resistance?
It is in the wests'/Israeli interests to secure Azery oil pipelines.

It is interesting an ex Democrat/Independent/Republican that might grab vice presidency... if McCain gets elected.
It did not work with Gore...
You can draw your own conclusions as to whom all the above scenarios will give security in the long run.




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