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No One Smokes Hemp


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#1 man

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Posted 13 October 2013 - 10:55 PM

Doing some research I found that there are two diverse opinions. Those who think hemp is another name for marijuana and those who think they are different names for two separate plants from the same leafy plant family. The fact is no one smokes hemp as they do with marijuana because hemp has only a tiny trace of the buzz-worthy chemical THC found in marijuana; you have to smoke more than two hundred pounds of hemp in order to get the buzz of one joint marijuana. It does not make sense. However the cultivation of hemp has been banned in USA for the simple reason that someone can plant marijuana and claim what is planed is hemp, therefore both marijuana & hemp were banned although US was free to import hemp. Hemp’s seeds, roots, stalks, fibers and oil are used for products including soap, clothing and construction materials. Restarting planting of hemp in US could be the miracle crop for dying farmers who can sell their hemp crop for industrial use.

However hemp planting, like its more potent sibling marijuana, remain illegal in US by Feds. “According to the Controlled Substances Act, there is no differentiation between marijuana and hemp,” says Dawn Dearden, a spokeswoman for the Drug Enforcement Administration in Washington. She says the federal law banning the two plants has been on the books since it was signed by President Nixon in 1970. But presently California and Colorado are working to legalize the cultivation of hemp. State lawmakers are being asked to come up with a plan to regulate hemp farming, same as corn farming.

Hemp could bring three times the profit of wheat cultivation. And in order to start American farmers need initially to import farming hemp-seeds from Canada, Europe and China along with the expertise of how to grow hemp.

Again, it's a fact that no one smokes hemp, although hemp springs from the same tall, leafy plant family as marijuana but the chemical composition of both are different, and to ban hemp just because it has the looks of marijuana plant does not make sense. Besides ethanol extracted from hemp can provide alternate source of oil for US --was this the real reason perhaps that hemp was put in the forbidden plants category despite having many industrial beneficial uses?



#2 man

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Posted 13 October 2013 - 11:17 PM

Corrected and modified version

 

Doing some research I found that there are two diverse opinions. Those who think hemp is another name for marijuana and those who think they are different names for two separate plants from the same leafy plant family. The fact is no one smokes hemp as they do with marijuana because hemp has only a tiny trace of the buzz-worthy chemical THC found in marijuana; you have to smoke more than two hundred pounds of hemp in order to get the buzz of one joint marijuana. It does not make sense. However the cultivation of hemp has been banned in USA for the simple reason that someone can plant marijuana and claim what is planted is hemp, therefore both marijuana & hemp were banned although US was free to import hemp. Hemp’s seeds, roots, stalks, fibers and oil are used for products including soap, clothing and construction materials. Restarting planting of hemp in US could be the miracle crop for dying farmers who can sell their hemp crop for industrial use.

However hemp planting, like its more potent sibling marijuana, remain illegal in US by Feds. “According to the Controlled Substances Act, there is no differentiation between marijuana and hemp,” says Dawn Dearden, a spokeswoman for the Drug Enforcement Administration in Washington. She says the federal law banning the two plants has been on the books since it was signed by President Nixon in 1970. But presently California and Colorado are working to legalize the cultivation of hemp. State lawmakers are being asked to come up with a plan to regulate hemp farming, same as corn farming.

Hemp could bring three times the profit of wheat cultivation. And in order to start American farmers need initially to import farming hemp-seeds from Canada, Europe and China along with the expertise of how to grow hemp. If planting hemp is more profitable than planting grains and vegetable then with the lifting of the ban US can face a real problem where most American farmers turn to farming hemp leaving US grain and vegetable dry and Americans facing hunger and bread-less future.

Again, it's a fact that no one smokes hemp, although hemp springs from the same tall, leafy plant family as marijuana but the chemical composition of both are different, and to ban hemp just because it has the looks of marijuana plant does not make sense. Besides ethanol extracted from hemp can provide alternate source of oil for US --was this the real reason perhaps that hemp was put in the forbidden plants category despite having many industrial beneficial uses?
But I think most likely hemp was banned to save USA from hunger! One more reason for regulating the hemp cultivation after the ban is lifted in order to ensure that there is always going to be bread to eat on American household tables.



#3 onjig

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 11:43 AM

The banning of cannabis is the US was popularised, brought into the eye in 1938 of the American People by the trumped up arrest of the famous drummer/bandleader Gene krupa. The sending of a man onto the stage where Krupa was playing to hand the drummer an envelop, followed by the arresting officer. America was told of instant insanity producing leaf that had been deemed a drug. Short movies were shown in classroom across the country of those under the influence jumping from building and eating razor blades and of course going on to stronger true drug addition. The whole government drug industry was formed to pounce on the offenders. The nation was told those who possessed this product must be put in prison before they could get to their children, however when the arrests were made it was their children.

The thousands who make a great living arresting, tracking, housing and treating those arrested want to keep their source of income.

 

So it follows that this plant or any plant relative plant must be illegal and kept from Americans  just as spray cans and marker must be kept from American children [to purchase spray paint cans and markers in most of the US the purchaser must be 18 yr of age].

 

Yes, American farmers should be allowed to grow hemp to boost Americas shrinking income. But the opposition, mostly government workers have an income to protect also.

 

The chances are not good for the growing of hemp to be permitted, good for the farmers, good for the country, or not.


Edited by onjig, 15 October 2013 - 11:45 AM.


#4 man

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Posted 10 February 2014 - 06:39 PM

Hemp for Armenia

first as heating fuel-wood for winter

hemp-uses-02-10-01.jpg

The first U.S. house built from hemp is located in Asheville, North Carolina, USA

Notice how that house is build only by iron bars and hemp. If hemp can be formed on the shape wood then it can be used to burn in stoves in rural Armenia in place of wood from trees, trees that are becoming scare in Armenia. Currently in rural areas of Armenia cow dungs in the shape shaped round and tree-woods are used for winter heating, hemp would come handy as another source of heat specially that even in rural towns gas and electricity may be cut off in winter because of accidents and overuse, as it happened recently in Vanadzor, the 3th largest city of Armenia.

The Top Five Most Innovative Uses For Hemp
9 February 2014
http://www.earth-hea...s-for-hemp.html

In 1937, Popular Science published an article called “Hemp: The New Billion-Dollar Crop” that listed over 25,000 potential uses for the plant.

While this ancient crop has recently started to gain popularity around the world, it still hasn’t received the attention it deserves.

Which might be due to the fact that hemp is just a type of marijuana that can’t get you high.

But as more countries start to see the benefits of this incredibly eco-friendly crop, a lot of cool R&D has been happening behind the scenes. Here’s 5 of our favorite innovations being developed from hemp:

1. Bacteria-Fighting Fabric
A Colorado company is using hemp to fight the spread of staph infections in hospitals. The plan is to offer antibacterial hemp fabric as a replacement for traditional cotton and polyester fabrics, where bacteria are known to survive for up to months at a time.

Various chemicals found in both hemp and cannabis have been shown to possess antibacterial and antifungal properties. EnviroTextile’s hemp fabric is still in development, but has already shown promise in early lab tests.

2. Housing Insulation
Insulation made from hemp is quickly becoming a popular eco-friendly alternative to traditional insulation materials like mineral wool.

Not only is hemp a more sustainable raw material, but the final product is also carbon-negative. That means it has the ability to absorb more greenhouse gases over its lifetime than emitted during the production process.

The production of mineral wool, on the other hand, contributes greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. A recent study compared the two insulation materials head-to-head and concluded that hemp was the more sustainable choice.

3. Concrete
Hemp has also found its way into concrete mixes. Hemp concrete can be used for a variety of construction needs, from walling to roof insulation to flooring.

On top of being carbon-negative, hemp concrete is said to be easier to work with and has natural insulating and moisture regulating properties. Hemp bricks also lack the brittleness of traditional concrete and thus do not require expansion joints.

4. Cars
Hemp composite can be found in cars made by Audi, BMW, Ford, GM, Chrysler, Mercedes, Lotus and Honda, among many others. Biocomposite made from hemp fiber is just as strong as fiberglass, but incredibly lightweight.

All-electric cars like the BMW i3 are especially reliant on hemp. BMW was able to shed about 10% of weight from the i3′s door panels by using hemp composite instead of traditional materials.

With fuel economy becoming a primary focus of all car makers, hemp composite will only become more common in cars in years to come.

5. Graphene-Like Nanomaterial
Graphene is often touted as the future of nanotechnology and the thinnest, strongest, and lightest material ever made. But how does hemp compare? Apparently, it’s even better.

Earlier this year, chemical engineers from the University of Alberta turned hemp fiber into a nanomaterial with similar properties as graphene, but a much lower price tag.

What’s more, when it comes to making energy storage devices like batteries and supercapacitors, the hemp nanomaterial showed “superior electrochemical storage properties” compared to graphene...

 

 






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