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Stunning Armenia, a fascinating glimpse into Noah’s land


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#121 Yervant1

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Posted 29 October 2018 - 09:38 AM

Al-Jazeera, Qatar
Oct 28 2018
 
 
Why have Gulf-based Filipinos fallen in love with Armenia?

Since 2014, the number of tourists rose from 674 to 22,000, and some even stayed behind to make home in Yerevan.

  •  
 
1b9e9bfc0d664cd9be87c10fc87fcc88_18.jpg
Renato Marilag owns Little Manila, a hostel in Yerevan popular with Filipinos. He and his wife, Marie, recently welcomed their baby Mia, who he hopes will grow up speaking Armenian [Renato Marilag]

Edward Rigor, a 29-year-old Filipino, was travelling in a minibus with several other tourists in Armenia. They had spent the morning visiting ancient monasteries.

It was spring, the weather was cool and everyone was eager to reach the mountains.

As they drew closer, Rigor rolled down the window and stuck his head out in the biting wind.

Others got their smartphones ready and craned their necks, hoping to catch their very first glimpse of snow.

Finally, in the distance, they saw it: the slopes just above Tsaghkadzor town were glimmering white. 

"When we got there, we were screaming inside. Everyone was taking pictures, videos, and recording for Facebook Live and Instagram," says Edward. "It was like being children again, taking our shirts off and playing in the snow.

"We all thought that we just have to be happy and treasure these moments, because who knows when we will see snow again?"

Edward is one of thousands who visit Armenia every year.

Since 2014, the number of Filipino tourists has shot up from 674 to over 22,000 in 2017, the Tourism Committee of Armenia told Al Jazeera.

And over the last few years, a growing number of Filipinos has settled in Yerevan, Armenia's capital - at least 300, according to the Philippines Embassy in Moscow. 

The Facebook group "Filipino Community in Yerevan City" boasts 1,300 members.

In December, we have more than 300 guests because Filipinos want to experience snow and a white Christmas. Throughout the year, the most popular tours are the ones to Mount Aragats, where there is always snow. It's the biggest attraction.

Renato Marilag, Little Manila hostel owner

Like Rigor, who lives Dubai and does admin work for a local supermarket, most Filipinos who visit are Oversees Filipino Workers (OFWs) in the UAE, Qatar, Bahrain, Kuwait and Saudi Arabia.

Because of visa rules in several Gulf countries, expatriate workers are forced to leave often to renew their visas. 

The "visa run" used to be merely a wearing formality - hopping on a bus or short flight across a border and coming back the same day. But many now are transforming this bureaucratic hindrance into an opportunity.

"Before we used to go to Kish Island in Iran, or Muscat [Oman]," says Edward, "but then we heard that in Armenia you can go on a tour while changing your visa. For Filipinos who have never experienced snow, it's amazing." 

66621e4a4bd84082a5c8027032338bad_18.jpg Edward Rigor and a friend enjoy a glass of wine in Yerevan, Armenia. He is one of more than 22,000 Filipinos to visit Armenia each year [Megan Iacobini de Fazio/Al Jazeera]

With flights starting from around $300 return, Armenia is one of the cheapest Christian countries for Filipinos to get to from the Gulf, and for the religious Filipino community, much of its allure lies in the possibility of visiting its ancient monasteries and churches. 

"To the extent that Christianity is important, having the opportunity for worship is vitally important," says professor James Tyner, who teaches geography at Kent State University in Ohio and has researched mobility and migration in the Filipino context. 

"Religion may form an important part of one's identity, and provides also a comforting structure to one's life. It provides stability in an unstable, precarious existence," he told Al Jazeera.

The bureaucratic aspect of working abroad means that the lives of many migrants often revolve around their legal status. They sometimes have to leave at a moment's notice, and spend months or years away from families. For this reasons, explains professor Tyner, community assumes tremendous importance.

Little Manila

Along one of the wide, tree-lined streets of Yerevan is Little Manila, a hostel and tour company that caters especially to Filipino visitors. A plastic menu hangs on the wall in the common room, colourful photos depicting the delicacies on offer: pork sinigang, lechon kawali, tapsilog and chicken tinola. 

"There are Little Manilas in Dubai and Hong Kong, so why not Yerevan too?" says Renato Marilag, one of the hostel's owners. He and his wife, Marie, recently welcomed their baby Mia.

"She's the first Armenian-Filipino baby," he claims. "I want her to grow up here and speak Armenian. I know she'll like it here." 

The graphic designer was living in the UAE when he first heard of the country. 

"I didn't know of anyone who had been," he says, "but one guy visited some years ago and the word spread. Now all Filipinos in the Gulf know about it." 

Beckoned by an entrepreneurial brother-in-law, Marilag travelled to Armenia for the first time in 2015 to scope out business opportunities.

He enjoyed the cool climate and found locals to be friendly and helpful, despite not always being able to speak English.

"Compared to Dubai, the quality of life here is very good. Salaries are much lower, but it's worth it. The climate is good, and people are nice," he says. 

Only a few months after his first visit, he and his partners opened the doors to Little Manila. Now, they welcome an average of 120 tourists every month and run tours to Garni Temple, Lake Sevan and Khor Virap Monastery.

"Being a Christian is very important for us, that's why Filipinos don't want to miss the historical churches when they come here. That is almost the first thing on people's minds," says Marilag. 

But not the very first thing. Little Manila's bookings skyrocket in winter when the ground is covered in a thick layer of snow. 

"In December, we have more than 300 guests because Filipinos want to experience snow and a white Christmas," says Marilag. "Throughout the year, the most popular tours are the ones to Mount Aragats, where there is always snow. It's the biggest attraction, for sure."

Rigor, for one, is planning a return trip in December. "Honestly, I just want to keep coming back to Armenia. Again and again."

700f55e6e937468e92e7454ccb509854_7.jpg Litttle Manila organises tours to churches and monasteries like this one, Khor Virap [Courtesy: Edward Rigor]


#122 Yervant1

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 10:30 AM

Panorama, Armenia
Jan 11 2019
 
 

‘Don't go to Armenia as you might get back with too many stories’: Unique travel film by Tolt

French travel blogger Benjamin Martinie, aka Tolt, has unveiled a unique video about Armenia he has made during his recent trip to the country.

In the video titled “Don't go to Armenia” that was posted on YouTube on Thursday, the blogger sarcastically tells the viewers to not visit the country as “you might get back with too many stories.”

The video depicts Armenia's colourful landscapes, wonderful nature, historical sites, ancient churches, traditional dishes and entertainment places. 

View the video at https://www.panorama.am/en/news/2019/01/11/travel-film-Armenia-Tolt/2057370?fbclid=IwAR0LB13dRY412AsIyTCoQkNmaKjfYe3N45Ulb8YlphNU-w3ntZei0YYH8eA

 

 


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#123 MosJan

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 12:26 PM

:ap:



#124 Yervant1

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Posted 17 January 2019 - 10:33 AM

PanArmenian, Armenia
Jan 16 2019
 
 
"Armenia: Land of Legend" book unveiled in Indonesia
264350.jpg
January 16, 2019 - 12:37 AMT

PanARMENIAN.Net - A photo book titled "Armenia: Land of Legend" at was unveiled in Jakarta, Indonesia on Tuesday, January 15, Antara News Agency reports.

"Geographically, Armenia`s population is indeed small when compared to Indonesia. It also has almost no historical connections. But the real challenge is to explain the wealth of natural beauty and Armenian culture to the Indonesian community extensively," Director of Antara News Agency Meidyatama Suryodiningrat said here on Tuesday.

Suryodiningrat expressed hope that the photo book could be a source of enlightenment describing the wonders of Armenia, which would trigger the interest of the Indonesian people to better understand the potential of the two countries.

However, the real challenge for introducing the country, which is bordered by Turkey to the west, Georgia to the north, Azerbaijan to the east, and Iran to the south, lies on how the information on the richness of Armenia's natural beauty and culture can be introduced to the people at large in Indonesia.

With a total population of around three million and a size of Indonesia`s Central Java Province, Armenia, which is a landlocked country in the South Caucasus region of Eurasia, is still absent on the radar of average Indonesians who possess information on the world`s economic super powers.

The Ambassador of Armenia to Indonesia, Dziunik Aghajanian, also hoped that the photo book could become an entry for Indonesian people who did not know Armenia comprehensively.

"Despite the historic presence of Armenian community in Indonesia throughout several centuries, nowadays, for many Indonesians, Armenia is an unknown terrain. I hope this book will be an introduction for those whose inquisitive mind will draw them to this hidden jewel called Armenia, one of the ancient countries, and its people rich in history, culture, and traditions," the ambassador stated.

The book, the ambassador noted, would attract them to visit this small nation with a warm heart and open mind, renowned for its hospitality, very tasty gastronomic culture, and exceptional creative mind that is depicted in the innumerous monuments dotting the scenic beauty of the land.

70 percent of the book content showcases selected photos, while the remaining presents articles about the richness of the Armenian history, culture, and scenic beauty.

http://www.panarmeni...ed_in_Indonesia

 


#125 Yervant1

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Posted 16 March 2019 - 11:20 AM

ARKA, Armenia
March 15 2019
 
 
David McKenzie pledges to invest $3.5 million in promotion of Armenia as tourism destination
1c15f630938301eca3347414e426862f.jpg

YEREVAN, March 15. /ARKA/. Speaking today at a tourism conference in Yerevan titled "Tourism and the Film Industry: Prospects for Cooperation" the President of the Associated Television International production company David McKenzie promised to help shoot videos about Armenia’s tourism potential. 

McKenzie is the producer of the Architects of Denial, a documentary on the Armenian Genocide of 1915, committed by then government of Turkey. 

In the late 70s and early 80s Australia and New Zealand invited McKenzie to help develop their tourism industry. 

"Americans know only about one country - America and therefore our main mission will be to present to them Armenia and the reasons why to visit it," said McKenzie. He said his first desire to visit Armenia emerged because of the stories of his Armenian father who told him about Armenian culture, history and cuisine. "In 2015, I had no reason to visit Armenia except for my roots and many people tried to dissuade me from it," said McKenzie.

This is his 10th visit to Armenia. McKenzie said his main task at the moment is to promote the Armenian economy and the tourism industry in cooperation with the Armenian government. He said he is ready to invest $3.5 million in shooting high-quality videos about Armenia and donate them to local travel agencies, hotels and all interested parties for a more worthy presentation of the country in the international tourism market and, above all, in the United States and Canada.

In addition to video clips about Armenia, the entrepreneur is also ready to shoot and present a series of tourist programs, to place at his own expense advertising billboards and posters in the United States. ‘We will work closely with the Armenian government to create good programs and attract tourists," said McKenzie.

David McKenzie's wife, Laura McKenzie, journalist and author of Laura McKenzie’s TV program Traveler, who has already shot a series of programs on tourism in Armenia, believes that there is a huge tourism potential in the country.

"Armenia has a huge potential for the development of adventure, religious, gastrotourism, but they all need a serious presentation and advancement," said McKenzie. –0--

http://arka.am/en/ne...m_destination_/



#126 gamavor

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Posted 02 April 2019 - 04:28 PM



All is correct, except point 16. You have ATM's at every corner in Yerevan and also almost everywhere you can use your credit or debit card. Moreover, you can pay your utility bill, telephone, whatever service you get at every crossroad in Yerevan, same goes for parking trough SMS, etc...(parking in the center is 100 Drams per hour - roughly 0.20 Eurocents).

#127 Yervant1

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Posted 24 April 2019 - 09:16 AM

Bloomberg
April 23 2019
 
 
 
Why You Should Go to Armenia Now, in 15 Inspiring Photos
By Benjamin Kemper        
 
‎April‎ ‎23‎, ‎2019‎ ‎3‎:‎00‎ ‎PM

Armenia, a landlocked country of about 3 million people in the Caucasus Mountains, has a few claims to fame: gold medal chess players, fraught geopolitics, Churchill’s favorite brandy, and—OK, fine—the Kardashians, who are proud Armenian Americans. But tourism? Most U.S. travelers couldn’t spot Armenia on a map (it’s sandwiched between Georgia and Iran), let alone fathom a trip there.

It’s time to reconsider, if you’ve considered it at all. Beyond Armenia’s popular tourist attractions—it has some of the world’s oldest churches—there are new reasons to bump the nation a few spots up your bucket list. Last year’s Velvet Revolution, which unseated a Russia-backed oligarch, has given the country a palpable, contagious optimism. New hotels are sprouting up in the capital city of Yerevan, where the restaurant scene is shedding its meat-and-potatoes standards in favor of bolder, spicier flavors. And this year, the Transcaucasian Trail will launch its first group hikes in Dilijan National Park. In other words, Armenia feels electric—so get in on the buzz.

 
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Holy Ground

Exactly how an ancient Roman temple wound up in the Armenian countryside—or how it remained intact despite countless invasions—is a subject of much debate. But what is clear is that the massive colonnaded structure is one of Eurasia’s most precious examples of pre-Christian architecture. Built in the first century, Garni was likely a shrine to the pagan sun god Mihr, though some scholars speculate it’s the tomb of a Romanized Armenian king or the defunct residence of some long-forgotten ruler.

Photographer: Benjamin Kemper

 
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Dance If You Want To

All kicks, whirls, and gravity-defying leaps, Armenian dance is an invigorating spectacle. In a popular routine called the Kochar, performers link hands and prance lithely to the soundtrack of a nasal-sounding zurna.

Photographer: KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV/AFP

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Don’t Look Down

The “Wings of Tatev” cable car glides some 200 meters (656 feet) above a rocky ravine on its way to Tatev Monastery, a ninth century complex clinging to a grassy clifftop. The 14-minute, 5,752-meter climb earned the cable car a Guinness World Record for the “world’s longest reversible aerial tramway.”

Photographer: KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV/AFP

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Soviet Relics

Space-age towers, neoclassical government buildings, dilapidated Khrushchyovka—while Armenia may have split from the Soviet Union almost three decades ago, judging from its architecture, you’d never know it. In Yerevan, one name comes up again and again: Alexander Tamanian, the Armenian architect who designed the city’s curiously circular street plan and drew the blueprints for the Cascade, opera house, and Republic Square. 

Source: State Tourism Committee of Armenia

 
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The Plan in Yerevan

Opened in 2018, the Alexander, a Luxury Collection outpost, single-handedly put Armenia on the high-end travel map. When you’re not out sightseeing—the hotel is a five-minute walk from Republic Square—unwind in the Anne Semonin spa, swanning from sauna to steam room to indoor pool. Or claim a stool at the rooftop bar to take in views of Yerevan’s signature pink-tuff buildings dwarfed by Mount Ararat in the background.  

Source: The Alexander, a Luxury Collection Hotel

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A Seat at Many Tables

Armenian food defies hard-and-fast generalizations. It borrows from Russian, Georgian, Persian, and Levantine playbooks without surrendering fully to any—dishes can range from lemony tabbouleh and mayonnaise-laden potato salad to cow hoof soup and baked dumplings in tomato sauce. That kind of variety makes Yerevan’s food scene a thrilling one: At lunch, you could be in Dolmama’s wallpapered dining room feasting on the best stuffed grape leaves of your life; and by dinner, at Lahmajun Gaidz (opened by a Syrian refugee) inhaling spicy lamb-topped lahmajun (flatbread) as you would a New York pizza slice, experiencing Armenian fast food at its finest.

Photographer: KAREN MINASYAN/AFP

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A Transcaucasian Invasion

Since 2015 an international team of literal trailblazers has been slogging away to create the Transcaucasian Trail, a wide-reaching network that will take hikers to some of the remotest corners of the Caucasus. The latest section to be completed, stretching 60 miles, winds through Dilijan National Park, a reserve as famous for its millennium-old monasteries as it is for its eagles, bears, lynxes, and wolves. Sign up for the inaugural June trek and be one of the first to hike it.

Source: State Tourism Committee of Armenia

 
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The Oldest Cathedral on Earth

Echmiadzin Cathedral, founded in the early fourth century, is to Armenian Christians what the Great Mosque is to Muslims and the Western Wall is to Jews: a place of incomparable spiritual importance. But you don’t have to be a believer to be bowled over by its splendor. Impossibly intricate reliefs depict Biblical and nature scenes; gilded frescoes glint in the sunlight. Visit before noon, and you might be treated to an impromptu choral performance by somber church singers carrying candles. 



#128 Yervant1

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Posted 24 April 2019 - 09:16 AM

Continued!

 

Photographer: Oneworld Picture/Universal Images Group Editorial

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A Wine Lover’s Paradise

When archaeologists unearthed the world’s oldest winery, estimated to be 6,100 years old, in southern Armenia three years ago, everyone gasped—except for Armenians. Wine has long been the lifeblood of local culture, consecrated at Armenian Apostolic masses, sipped at elaborate traditional feasts, and chugged on raucous nights out. Sample some of the country’s best bottles at In Vino, a cobwebbed cubbyhole where wine geeks splurge on award-winning labels like Karas and Zorah, or at Wine Republic, where the French bistro menu is almost as varied as its 650-bottle list.   

Source: In Vino

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On This Rock

You could spend weeks monastery-hopping across Armenia and still not hit them all, but one is a must: Geghard, a Unesco World Heritage Site. The labyrinthine monastery complex includes a wealth of hypnotic khachkars (cross-stones), a 13th century church, and even older chapels and vestries hewn straight into the side of a cliff, their walls blackened from centuries of candlelight.

Source: State Tourism Committee of Armenia

 
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Just Add Heat

Meat, salt, and fire are all you need to make khorovats, Armenia’s omnipresent skewers of grilled beef, pork, or lamb. But don’t be fooled—Armenians have elevated the common kebab into an art form. A good grill master selects the finest cuts, salts the meat just so, and pulls the shampoor (skewer) from the flame when the meat is crackling and dribble-down-your-chin juicy.

Photographer: DEA / ALBERT CEOLAN/De Agostini Editorial

1200x-1.jpg
An Unforgettable Memorial

The Armenian Genocide of 1915 killed at least 1 million Armenians and forced millions more to flee their ancestral home of eastern Turkey. This intentionally bleak, gray monument, part of the Tsitsernakaberd Memorial Complex, overlooks Yerevan as a memorial. Budget a couple of hours—and packs of tissues—for the haunting collection of artifacts, images, and testimonials that drive home the gravity of this national tragedy.

Photographer: Maja Hitij/Getty Images Europe

1200x-1.jpg
Velvet Revolution

Armenia is renewing itself following 2018’s peaceful Velvet Revolution and subsequent parliamentary elections, which replaced an oligarchical, Russia-backed government with a more Western-sympathizing one. The new administration, headed by journalist-turned-politician Nikol Pashinyan, has a tough road ahead: 1 in 3 Armenians lives below the poverty line, while the average wage hovers around $355 a month.

Photographer: VANO SHLAMOV/AFP

 
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Drink of Choice

“Cuban cigars, Armenian brandy, and no sport!” That trifecta, according to Winston Churchill, was the key to a long life. Test his hypothesis at Yerevan Brandy Co. (daily tours available), where the brandy he adored is still made in much the same way. Aged in Caucasian oak barrels and double-distilled for purity, it gives French cognac a run for its money.

Source: Yerevan Brandy Co.

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Land of Lakes

Covering 16 percent of Armenia’s surface area, Lake Sevan makes the landlocked country a veritable beach destination. The lapping waves keep Armenians (and a host of other neighboring nationals) cool during parched summers. Even if it’s too chilly to take a dip, you can snap postcard-worthy pics of the Hayravank and Sevanavank monasteries, dramatically set against the sparkling blue water.

Source: State Tourism Committee of Armenia

 
 
 

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#129 gamavor

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Posted 29 April 2019 - 12:01 PM

https://www.story.on...LAGhYeznyHrvUq4

"Liegt Armenien überhaupt in Europa?"
Wo soll ich anfangen? Dass hier Menschen leben, die trotz aller Hürden nie aufgegeben haben, für ihre Heimat und für die Eigenständigkeit zu kämpfen. Und dass die Einwohner Hayastans, wie die Einwohner ihr Land nennen, nie die Lust am Leben verloren haben? Oder dass am Platz der Republik dann und wann "La Bohéme" von Charles Aznavour in französisch erklingt und Liebende sich an der Cascade in allen Sprachen ihre Treue schwören. So mancher Geniesser flaniert auch gerne auch in Cafés, die genauso gut in Paris oder Rom liegen könnten? So mancher Taxifahrer trumpft mit Witz und Humor auf, der einem Wiener Schmäh um nichts nachsteht und wenn sie es wollen, können Kumpanen in urigen Tavernen und Pubs bis zur späten Stunde auch deutsches oder belgisches Bier trinken.
Was macht Armenien also europäisch? Geht es darum, dass in diesem Land – zumindest den Armeniern zufolge – auch der Wein und entsprechend auch die Kultur des Genusses erfunden und zu den alten Griechen exportiert wurde? Vielleicht lässt sich Europa auch erspüren, wenn man in entlegenen Klöstern in den Bergen meditiert und alte Fresken des ältesten christlichen Landes bewundert oder ehrfürchtig auf die weissen Spitzen des Berg Ararats blickt.
Bei gutem Essen genießt man armenische Gastfreundschaft und mitunter philosophiert man auch bei armenischen Tee und Ararat Cognac über das Land.
"Als in Rom noch Ziegenhirten weideten, war Yerevan schon eine Hochkultur.”, gibt so mancher stolz preis, “Und überhaupt wusstest du, dass König Tigranes Reich über ganz Anatolien erstreckt hat?“ Zur Geschichte gibt es viele Theorien, es gehört zum guten Ton bei ausgedehnten Familienfeiern über etwas mehr armenischen Einfluss in Europa zu spekulieren. Und mit jedem Schluck Ararat Cognac oder armenischen Wein fallen mehr Geschichten ein. Bei jedem Toast wird von vielen Persönlichkeiten berichtet – von Prinzessin Diana und anderen Berühmtheiten in Europa und auch weiter weg - sie alle haben armenische Wurzeln, sagt man zumindest in Armenien.
An manchen Tagen wird an der östlichen Grenzen noch scharf geschossen, die westliche ist zu. Eingekeilt zwischen zwei Rivalen besinnen sich viele darauf, dass die Diaspora-Armenier ihre alte Heimat nie vergessen haben und einige von ihnen auch zurückkehren. An den Flughäfen trifft ein Reisender viele Armenier, die fließend französisch, englisch oder deutsch sprechen und sobald sie im Taxi sind, den Fahrer mit Barev DZez begrüssen.
Und auch wenn Wikipedia sagt, dass Europa in Georgien aufhört. Was ist schon Geographie! Vielmehr liegt Armenien im Geiste und auch im Herzen Europas!
© Stefan Papp

#130 MosJan

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Posted 30 April 2019 - 03:28 PM

:) so far i got  Hayastans - Ararat Cognac + "La Bohéme" von Charles Aznavour + Cafés + Armenien + Armeniern + Genusses + Ararats + Yerevan :ap: 



#131 MosJan

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Posted 30 April 2019 - 03:29 PM

 

Continued!

 

Photographer: Oneworld Picture/Universal Images Group Editorial

1200x-1.jpg
A Wine Lover’s Paradise

When archaeologists unearthed the world’s oldest winery, estimated to be 6,100 years old, in southern Armenia three years ago, everyone gasped—except for Armenians. Wine has long been the lifeblood of local culture, consecrated at Armenian Apostolic masses, sipped at elaborate traditional feasts, and chugged on raucous nights out. Sample some of the country’s best bottles at In Vino, a cobwebbed cubbyhole where wine geeks splurge on award-winning labels like Karas and Zorah, or at Wine Republic, where the French bistro menu is almost as varied as its 650-bottle list.   

Source: In Vino

1200x-1.jpg
On This Rock

You could spend weeks monastery-hopping across Armenia and still not hit them all, but one is a must: Geghard, a Unesco World Heritage Site. The labyrinthine monastery complex includes a wealth of hypnotic khachkars (cross-stones), a 13th century church, and even older chapels and vestries hewn straight into the side of a cliff, their walls blackened from centuries of candlelight.

Source: State Tourism Committee of Armenia

 
1200x-1.jpg
Just Add Heat

Meat, salt, and fire are all you need to make khorovats, Armenia’s omnipresent skewers of grilled beef, pork, or lamb. But don’t be fooled—Armenians have elevated the common kebab into an art form. A good grill master selects the finest cuts, salts the meat just so, and pulls the shampoor (skewer) from the flame when the meat is crackling and dribble-down-your-chin juicy.

Photographer: DEA / ALBERT CEOLAN/De Agostini Editorial

1200x-1.jpg
An Unforgettable Memorial

The Armenian Genocide of 1915 killed at least 1 million Armenians and forced millions more to flee their ancestral home of eastern Turkey. This intentionally bleak, gray monument, part of the Tsitsernakaberd Memorial Complex, overlooks Yerevan as a memorial. Budget a couple of hours—and packs of tissues—for the haunting collection of artifacts, images, and testimonials that drive home the gravity of this national tragedy.

Photographer: Maja Hitij/Getty Images Europe

1200x-1.jpg
Velvet Revolution

Armenia is renewing itself following 2018’s peaceful Velvet Revolution and subsequent parliamentary elections, which replaced an oligarchical, Russia-backed government with a more Western-sympathizing one. The new administration, headed by journalist-turned-politician Nikol Pashinyan, has a tough road ahead: 1 in 3 Armenians lives below the poverty line, while the average wage hovers around $355 a month.

Photographer: VANO SHLAMOV/AFP

 
1200x-1.jpg
Drink of Choice

“Cuban cigars, Armenian brandy, and no sport!” That trifecta, according to Winston Churchill, was the key to a long life. Test his hypothesis at Yerevan Brandy Co. (daily tours available), where the brandy he adored is still made in much the same way. Aged in Caucasian oak barrels and double-distilled for purity, it gives French cognac a run for its money.

Source: Yerevan Brandy Co.

1200x-1.jpg
Land of Lakes

Covering 16 percent of Armenia’s surface area, Lake Sevan makes the landlocked country a veritable beach destination. The lapping waves keep Armenians (and a host of other neighboring nationals) cool during parched summers. Even if it’s too chilly to take a dip, you can snap postcard-worthy pics of the Hayravank and Sevanavank monasteries, dramatically set against the sparkling blue water.

Source: State Tourism Committee of Armenia

 
 
 

 

Brother that khorovats looks sooooo goooood 



#132 gamavor

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Posted 01 May 2019 - 12:29 PM

:) so far i got  Hayastans - Ararat Cognac + "La Bohéme" von Charles Aznavour + Cafés + Armenien + Armeniern + Genusses + Ararats + Yerevan :ap:



Basically he explains why Armenia should be considered the heart of Europe...and I very much agree with him:)
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#133 Yervant1

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Posted 06 May 2019 - 09:16 AM

The Asian Age, India
May 5 2019
 
 
Armenia is a wine lover’s paradise
THE ASIAN AGE. | BENJAMIN KEMPER
 
 
 
 

Covering 16 percent of Armenia’s surface area, Lake Sevan makes the landlocked country a veritable beach destination.

aa-Cover-m3uuh9t5kqo80ndqsc9hubt7g1-2019
 Soviet relics like space-age towers, neoclassical government buildings.

When archaeologists unearthed the world’s oldest winery, estimated to be 6,100 years old, in southern Armenia three years ago, everyone gasped —except for Armenians.

Armenia, a landlocked country of about 3 million people in the Caucasus Mountains, has a few claims to fame: gold medal chess players, fraught geopolitics, Churchill’s favorite brandy, and—OK, fine—the Kardashians, who are proud Armenian Americans. But tourism? Most U.S. travelers couldn’t spot Armenia on a map (it’s sandwiched between Georgia and Iran), let alone fathom a trip there.

5ac923f50258466de154f96c3a7e23143dd08d93Kochar performers dance to glory

It’s time to reconsider, if you’ve considered it at all. Beyond Armenia’s popular tourist attractions — it has some of the world’s oldest churches — there are new reasons to bump the nation a few spots up your bucket list. Last year’s Velvet Revolution, which unseated a Russia-backed oligarch, has given the country a palpable, contagious optimism. New hotels are sprouting up in the capital city of Yerevan, where the restaurant scene is shedding its meat-and-potatoes standards in favor of bolder, spicier flavors. And this year, the Transcaucasian Trail will launch its first group hikes in Dilijan National Park. In other words, Armenia feels electric — so get in on the buzz.

Connoisseur’s Choice  
When archaeologists unearth-ed the world’s oldest winery, estimated to be 6,100 years old, in southern Armenia three years ago, everyone gasped — except for Armenians.


ac4fe18da832999c0b855497ad55ff29fe08fd2a
Yerevan Brandy Co., where the brandy, Winston Churchill adored, is still made in much the same way
 

Wine has long been the lifeblood of local culture, consecrated at Armenian Apostolic masses, sipped at elaborate traditional feasts, and chugged on raucous nights out. Sample some of the country’s best bottles at In Vino, a cobwebbed cubbyhole where wine geeks splurge on award-winning labels like Karas and Zorah, or at Wine Republic, where the French bistro menu is almost as varied as its 650-bottle list.

Drink of Choice
“Cuban cigars, Armenian brandy, and no sport!” That trifecta, according to Winston Churchill, was the key to a long life. Test his hypothesis at Yerevan Brandy Co. (daily tours available), where the brandy he adored is still made in much the same way. Aged in Caucasian oak barrels and double-distilled for purity, it gives French cognac a run for its money.

323b57e19ea26714320203a044eeb2e2998499c8Lake Sevan makes the landlocked country a veritable beach destination

Holy Ground
Exactly how an ancient Roman temple wound up in the Armenian countryside — or how it remained intact despite countless invasions — is a subject of much debate. But what is clear is that the massive colonnaded structure is one of Eurasia’s most precious examples of pre-Christian architecture. Built in the first century, Garni was likely a shrine to the pagan sun god Mihr, though some scholars speculate it’s the tomb of a Romanised Armenian king or the defunct residence of some long-forgotten ruler.

Oldest Cathedral On Earth
Echmiadzin Cathedral, founded in the early fourth century, is to Armenian Christians what the Great Mosque is to Muslims and the Western Wall is to Jews: a place of incomparable spiritual importance. But you don’t have to be a believer to be bowled over by its splendor. Impossibly intricate reliefs depict Biblical and nature scenes; gilded frescoes glint in the sunlight. Visit before noon, and you might be treated to an impromptu choral performance by somber church singers carrying candles.

5883598690c7766fe861e77c01cfd7c9aa896feeEchmiadzin Cathedral, founded in the early fourth century is the oldest cathedral on earth

Holy Ground
Exactly how an ancient Roman temple wound up in the Armenian countryside—or how it remained intact despite countless invasions—is a subject of much debate. But what is clear is that the massive colonnaded structure is one of Eurasia’s most precious examples of pre-Christian architecture.

Built in the first century, Garni was likely a shrine to the pagan sun god Mihr, though some scholars speculate it’s the tomb of a Romanized Armenian king or the defunct residence of some long-forgotten ruler.

858169b273829f45c4ba23038cc31d11c687ffc7The Geghard monastery complex in Armenia

Soviet Relics
Space-age towers, neoclassical government buildings, dilapidated Khrushchyovka — while Armenia may have split from the Soviet Union almost three decades ago, judging from its architecture, you’d never know it. In Yerevan, one name comes up again and again: Alexander Tamanian, the Armenian architect who designed the city’s curiously circular street plan and drew the blueprints for the Cascade, opera house, and Republic Square.

On This Rock
You could spend weeks monastery-hopping across Armenia and still not hit them all, but one is a must: Geghard, a Unesco World Heritage Site. The labyrinthine monastery complex includes a wealth of hypnotic khachkars (cross-stones), a 13th century church, and even older chapels and vestries hewn straight into the side of a cliff, their walls blackened from centuries of candlelight.

da9d1dedac187057d09faebc001bdeb535e2cfb9Built in the first century, Garni was likely a shrine to the pagan sun god Mihr

Land of Lakes
Covering 16 percent of Armenia’s surface area, Lake Sevan makes the landlocked country a veritable beach destination.

The lapping waves keep Armenians (and a host of other neighboring nationals) cool during parched summers. Even if it’s too chilly to take a dip, you can snap postcard-worthy pics of the Hayravank and Sevanavank monasteries, dramatically set against the sparkling blue water.
— Bloomberg

 
 


#134 Yervant1

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Posted 21 June 2019 - 09:24 AM

Not so stunning side of Armenians! Shameful. :(

Panorama, Armenia

June 20 2019
 
 
Tourists clear garbage near Armenia’s Temple of Garni

Around a week ago, a group of foreign tourists cleared the garbage near the Temple of Garni located in Armenia’s Kotayk Province on their own initiative.

Swiss, Swedish, and Indian youths also cleaned up the Azat River around the temple from trash, Apaga platform said in a Facebook post.

“These young people proved that nature is part of us all, regardless of nationality and origin.

“As a local, how do you feel when outsiders seem to care more about Armenia's environment than locals?” the post read.

64996036_2315740561798603_26435909824439

https://www.panorama...e-Garni/2130312

 

 



#135 MosJan

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Posted 21 June 2019 - 10:53 AM

jannnnn :ap:



#136 Yervant1

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Posted 29 June 2019 - 07:32 AM

Panorama, Armenia
June 28 2019
 
 
UAE ambassador hails Armenia as ‘safe and peaceful’ country

Armenia is a safe and peaceful country with hospitable and friendly people, Ambassador of the United Arab Emirates to Armenia Mohammed Issa Al Qattam Al Zaabi said in an exclusive interview to Panorama.am.

“Armenia is a country with rich culture, history and inherited civilization. I am happy to work here. Armenians are kind people, who show respect and appreciation for foreigners and tourists. They often view a foreigner as an Armenian, which is very good,” the ambassador said.

Asked to comment on Armenia-UAE relations, Al Zaabi described them as ‘unique’, adding they have been developing in all sectors in recent years.

“Armenian President Armen Sarkissian’s visit to the United Arab Emirates and his participation in the Abu Dhabi Sustainability Week in January this year was a successful visit, which gave a new impetus to the strengthening of relations in different spheres,” the senior official said, also highlighting the recent visit of the Armenian defense minister to the UAE to attend Idex 2019 international defense exhibition.

“We have a commotion vision for development of our relations to open up new prospects for cooperation,” the envoy said.

Al Zaabi stressed the opening of the UAE Embassy in Armenia has significantly boosted the trade turnover between the two countries. “The trade turnover between the two countries totaled to only $80 million before the opening of the embassy in 2014, whereas it rose to $250 million in 2017 and around $180 million in 2018. The opening of the embassy in 2015 also aimed at boosting economic relations between the two countries,” he stressed.

Also, he presented the official figures on tourism arrivals, according to which a total of 11,500 tourists visited Armenia from the United Arab Emirates in 2018, stressing the UAE citizens feel safe in Yerevan. The ambassador also named Armenian people’s hospitability and Armenia’s great culture, civilization and history as other key factors attracting the UAE nationals.

Asked to speak about the installment of the unique Ministry of Happiness in the country and its functions, Mohammed Al Zaabi said happiness is important but is not dependent on material possessions.

“Happiness begins with a child's upbringing, education and health, the country's history, culture, and agriculture, the water that we drink. These are the components of happiness, not money and wealth,” the ambassador stressed.

Mohammed Al Zaabi, who has been in office for only four months, named Lake Sevan as his favorite place in Armenia. The ambassador also loves the Armenian capital. “Yerevan is an old city. I love old cities since they reflect the civilization, culture and values of the country…The most important thing for me is that I feel safe and secure here,” Al Zaabi said. 

https://www.panorama...Armenia/2133313



#137 Yervant1

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Posted 03 July 2019 - 08:41 AM

JAM News
July 2 2019
 
 
Dutch entrepreneurs come to Armenia to teach, stay to live
Gayane Mkrtchyan, Yerevan
July 2, 2019

“The first year when we moved, I was shocked. Life in Armenia is not at all the same as in Europe”, says Sarah, now the hostess of a guest house and camping site

Sara-2-785x487.jpg 
Sandra Commandeur and her husband Marty Pieterse came to Armenia from the Netherlands seven years ago.

 

They were invited to work with the Dutch company Greenhouse. Sandra and Marty came to instruct locals in the use of greenhouses to grow Dutch roses. The couple didn’t even imagine that they would end up staying in Armenia after their contract came to an end.

 

“I had not even heard of Armenia’s existence, but soon it became a second home for me. I like the people here. Of course, in the beginning, the first year when we moved, I was shocked. Life in Armenia is not at all the same as in Europe.

At first the contract was made for a year, and then we extended it for another three years. My husband is a specialist in greenhouses, and I am a teacher. But because my parents were also specialists in the construction of greenhouses, I have always been familiar with the subject,” Sandra says.

IMG_4607.jpg

At first the couple lived in the home of an Armenian family in Gokht.

“They spoke Russian in addition to Armenian. At first I thought to learn Russian, but because our colleagues, mostly young girls and women, were born in the post-Soviet period, they spoke more Armenian and I decided to learn Armenian instead. It was difficult of course, but I got the hang of it.

The girls helped me learn Armenian. I was like a young child who was only beginning to learn the language. I learned it in about a year. My first words were hello, incorrect, did you understand me, and so on,” says Sandra.

Over the next three years the couple got quite attached to Gokht and to their fellow villagers. Local residents also grew attached to them. After their work contract ended, Marty bought a home in the village in which nobody had lived for 15 years, and began to repair and fix it up.

“The view alone that we have is enough to stay here forever. It’s a fairy tale. After the renovation, we decided to open a guest home for our friends and their families. We began doing something we had never done before.

This was a brave step for us of course. A new business, risks, investments in a country that you don’t know very well, but you don’t want to leave either. We thought, if it works, then great, if not, then our friends and family will have an interesting place to spend their vacation,” Sandra explains.

IMG_4629.jpg

The house is located on a hill from where one has a view of Gegam Ride and Khosrow Forest. Gokht itself is some 40 kilometres away from Yerevan, neighboring Garni [ed. where there is a pagan temple from the 1st century] and Geghard [ed. a monastery complex on the UNESCO cultural heritage list] – very touristic destinations in Armenia.

IMG_4613.jpg

There is a road through the village to Azhdanak Mountain which has a peak of 3,500 metres. It too is a very popular destination for hikers in the country.

Considering all of these aspects, the pair decided to open their guest house called “3G” in 2014.

“We live on the first floor of the house, and on the second floor there are rooms for guests and our B&B. For four years we had four rooms for guests and we could put up a total of eight people. We did not make more rooms, but now we have a campsite as well.

Before the campsite we had many tourists come by bike and motorcycle, and they asked us to stay the night in the courtyard or to use the toilet. As a result, we bought the neighboring plot of land and started to think about making a campsite,” Sandra says.

IMG_4631.jpg

While the camping industry is still new in Armenia, Sandra says that many tourists from Germany, Italy, the Czech Republic, Holland, Switzerland and Russia have shown interest.

“Four years ago we had 170 people. In 2017 we had more than 500. Many tourists come from Germany. They like to go to new countries that they don’t know about. The Dutch first ask where Armenia is, but Germans say immediately: we don’t know anything about the country, but we want to go there. Some even come back,” Sandra says, pouring guests cherry juice that she had made herself.

IMG_4578.jpg

ccording to the statistics committee, international tourism in the period from January to March 2019 recorded an increase of 5.2% compared with the same period last year. During this time, 364,489 tourists visited the country.

 

IMG_4646-225x300.jpgSandra also notes that there are more tourists. But she believes that there are problems that hinder the development of tourism: bad roads, insufficiently developed infrastructure and expensive air tickets. She adds that in April-May in the days of the Velvet Revolution, roads were blocked and many could not get to Gokht. But after the revolution, the number of tourists increased because many wanted to visit the country in which the revolution had occurred.

The Ministry of Economic Development and Investments confirms that there is an increase in the number of tourists wishing to see the new Armenia. The numbers are expected to increase in autumn. Recently, gastrotourism, ethnotourism and ecotourism have also become popular here.

Sandra and her husband go back to the Netherlands every year for two weeks, during which time they come to miss Armenia, their home, despite the problems and the number of critical issues in tourism and starting a new business.

“We love Gokht in Armenia. It has become our second home. When we leave for the Netherlands, we want to come home pretty soon after. I have worked and lived in various countries, but I always wanted to return to Holland because I knew that those countries were not my own. But I have a different feeling when it comes to Armenia,” Sandra says.

 

https://jam-news.net...h-stay-to-live/


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#138 MosJan

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Posted 03 July 2019 - 11:11 AM

:ap:



#139 Yervant1

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Posted 07 July 2019 - 07:36 AM

Philippine Star
July 7 2019
 
 
Amen to Armenia
 
RENDEZVOUs - Christine S. Dayrit (The Philippine Star) - July 7, 2019 - 12:00am
 
                         

Traveling gives us a whole new perspective of what really is. The magical beauty of a place suddenly comes alive before our very eyes. Just like this recent trip to Armenia.

Armenia is the country where Noah’s Ark is believed to have found its resting place. It is also said that the Holy Lance that pierced the body of Christ was kept in a cave in this country.

A landlocked country with Turkey to the west, Georgia to the north, and Azerbaijan to the east, Armenia boasts a history longer than most European countries.

Together with my traveling companions from Adams Express Travel led by the gracious Nema Ocon, we discovered a whole new world of magical ambience in Tatev Monastery via the longest cable car ever built in only one section called “The Wings of Tatev.” The Tatev Monastery, which was built in the 9th century, was considered the wealthiest medieval monastery in Armenia. In the 10th century, the region’s best school was created at Tatev — it became a mecca for scholars in the arts over the years. Paired with spectacular designs and breathtaking scenery, Tatev Monastery has a diverse historical significance.

Then we proceeded to Khor Virap (Armenian for “deep dungeon”), the most sacred pilgrimage destination in Armenia, not only because it’s the only place in the country where you’ll get the best view of the biblical Mount Ararat (standing high at 5,165 meters), but this is also where Saint Gregory the Illuminator was imprisoned for 13 years by King Tiridates III for preaching Christianity. When the King found out that Grigor Lusavorich (Saint Gregory before canonization) survived after all these years, he told his men to find and release him thinking that Lusarovich could cure his illness. When Lusavorich cured him, the King begged for his forgiveness and their monarch system was subsequently converted into Christianity. What makes Khor Virap such a special and sacred destination is its mark in the start of Christianity.

Ararat is also believed to be the resting place of Noah’s Ark. Guided by the remote majesty of biblical Mount Ararat we explored the site, its underground chambers and elegant chapels, and were captivated by ascetic atmosphere. As you observe the beauty of such creation, it makes you feel connected to God.

Moving to the heart of Armenia’s own Vatican City, we enjoyed a day at Holy Echmiadzin with its world’s earliest Christian churches included in the list of UNESCO World Heritage Sites. In this religious center proudly stands the Echmiadzin Mother Cathedral (4th century), the world’s oldest official Christian church; and St. Hripsime Church (7th century), a true masterpiece of early medieval Armenian architecture. Strolling around this monastery feels like walking in the past, a marvelous area filled with sacred objects.

In the west of Yerevan and also within sight of the Ararat mountains are the ruins of the unusual Zvartnots Temple. It was built at a time when much of Armenia was under Byzantine control or influence and during the early invasions of Armenia by the Muslim Arabs. The 7th century temple area was excavated in the 20th century and is now a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Its architecture and location is a feast for the eyes; the temple was believed to be a sacred place dedicated to angels. Zvartnots is not huge but truly spectacular nonetheless.

We were delighted with the main highlights of Yerevan. The Cascade, the huge white stairway that links the downtown area of Yerevan to the monument neighborhood, was built in the 1970s, comparable to a natural cascade in a river or stream. This monument is composed of a succession of escalators and exterior stairs that “cascade” down to the lower Kentron district.

We also admired Victory Park (Haghtanaky Zbosaygi) where a striking Soviet-era statue commands an incredible panoramic city view. Mayr Hayastan, the statue well known as the female personification of Armenia, symbolizes strength and is a tribute to motherhood. It’s such a stern figure, considering how cheery and amiable Armenians are.

About 20 kilometers to the east of Yerevan is the Garni pagan temple (Temple of the Sun God Mithra), dating back to 77 A.D. Located in an amazing natural setting, it was the summer residence of the Armenian kings. The complex also includes royal palace ruins and Roman Baths with a well-preserved mosaic. The structure can be seen as a depiction of the cosmos, with a raised platform on top of nine steps leading to the main entrance. There are 24 columns in the temple representing the hours of the day with six in front and the back, and eight on the sides, which is the symbol of life. Visitors will leave in awe, as the monument is the only still-standing Greek temple in the former Soviet Union.

We continued our discovery of Armenia until we reached the Geghard cave monastery, an outstanding medieval masterpiece, partly carved out of a mountainside that is remarkably well preserved. It is said that the “Holy Lance” that pierced the body of Christ was kept here. The complex was introduced in the 4th century as a sacred spring inside a cave. Today it is included on the list of UNESCO World Heritage sites.

We traveled, too, to the Gegharkunik province for Lake Sevan. Despite being landlocked, Armenia can still boast its “blue pearl,” the majestic Lake Sevan, which is the world’s second greatest high-altitude fresh-water lake. We visited Sevanavank Monastery with its St. Atakelots and St. Astvatsatsin churches, located on the peninsula. From the monastery you can marvel at the beautiful view of Lake Sevan, the “blue-eyed” bride of Armenia.

We left Armenia with memories to cherish for a lifetime. Come and visit Armenia and experience it on your own.

 

Email the author at miladay.star@gmail.com

https://www.philstar...07/amen-armenia


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#140 Yervant1

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Posted 09 July 2019 - 08:57 AM

News.am, Armenia
July 8 2019
 
 
Lorenzo Quinn: Armenia truly touched my heart and inspired me
19:15, 08.07.2019
                  
 
default.jpg
 

Famous Italian sculptor Lorenzo Quinn was quite impressed when he left Armenia.

“Armenia truly touched my heart and inspired me,” the sculptor said.

Lorenzo Quinn was in Armenia at the invitation of creator of the Narekatsi art-project Yulianna Parakshiyeva. Yulianna and the sculptor are working on the implementation of several projects in Armenia, and the possibility of unveiling Quinn’s sculpture in Armenia is also being considered.

“I have been interested in Lorenzo Quinn’s works for a long time. Since I was very impressed with his work, I immediately thought that I should invite him to Armenia and carry out cultural projects in Armenia. I was very happy when Lorenzo accepted my offer,” Yulianna Parakshiyeva.

“This is simply a wonderful country where there is so much to discover. I am thankful to the hospitable and generous Yulianna Parakshiyeva for showing me this marvelous country,” Lorenzo Quinn noted.

TUMO Center for Creative Technologies hosted a public discussion with the sculptor. The Italian sculptor was also hosted by President Armen Sarkissian, who welcomed the artist’s first visit to Armenia and stated that he has always highly appreciated the acting mastery and roles of his father, Anthony Quinn.

Before departing from Armenia, Lorenzo Quinn advised on his official Instagram page to include Armenia in the list of countries that people have to visit.

https://news.am/eng/news/522659.html

 





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