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#61 Zartonk

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Posted 18 May 2010 - 05:43 PM

Armenia. Footwear and Archaeology


2010-04-21 11:30:19


Archeologists have found out in Armenia, in a cave of Areni the oldest footwear of the period энеолита, so-called «charuh» which is dated 3600-3500 BC, the director of institute of archeology and ethnography of National Academy of sciences of Armenia Pavel Avetisjan at press conference in the International press centre "News" has informed on Friday.

"Charuh" sewed from one piece leather. It was the accessible type of footwear from a pigleather or a horned cattle leather. The strongest were charuh from a leather of an old bull.

According to the archeologist, it is an all-important find - completely saved artefact that seldom happens in archaeological practice.

«That fact is interesting that between the found artefact and its modern analogues which were carried by our grandfathers, there is no distinction as on quality, and to drawing», - Avetisjan has told.

He has noticed that it allows to generate complete submission concerning quality and a method of processing, up to features of their production.

Avetisyan has noticed that it is the oldest archeological find from all kinds of footwear which have been found out in Old World territory.

The Armenian archeologists have found out in the south of the country, in a cave of "Areni-1" a unique complex of an epoch of the Stone Age and энеолита, dated 3900-3700 years B.C.

During control excavation in a cave of "Areni-1" the unique complex of an epoch of the Stone Age and eneolit with pise-walled structures has been opened. Uniqueness of opening consisted that thanks to a microclimate existing there organic materials were saved. In a cave scraps of a fabric, a wool and other materials, stones and even grapes pulp, and also a skull with the rests of brain fabrics are found out.

#62 Arpa

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Posted 18 May 2010 - 07:01 PM

Armenia. Footwear and Archaeology


2010-04-21 11:30:19
---
"Charuh" sewed from one piece leather. It was the accessible type of footwear from a pigleather or a horned cattle leather. The strongest were charuh from a leather of an old bull.

Nothing new here. Every archeological story we have seen are so amateurish that no scientist will take it seriously. Many times we see these stories with the picture of one person with a rusty shovel in hand. Until archeology in Armenia becomes a real science, i.e find the skull of Loussavorich and the remains of the Battle of Avarayr, we will take it as MYTHOLOGY.Was there really a Loussavorich and a Vardan, or are they figments of someone's imagination?
Haha Hehe! Forgive me. I forgot to take my silly pills this morning. :goof: I still cannot make head or foot :oops: of the above article., i.e do we know what condition the leather is in, or do we have pictures/photos of it? Did the photolab lose the filims? Also note that I am not making fun of the story but the wordings the syntax and semantics. We have spoken about this before. So they found a 3600-3500 BC leather footwear? Some tell us that the exodus people wandered in the desert for 40 years, repeat, count them FORTY YEARS, three generations in the least :jester: yet no one has found not only footwear but not even a shoelace. Enough about those imbeciles who assume everyone else is a moron.

As usual the above article is so disjointed, obviously it is Russky-English, that I cannot make ant sense of it.
“charuh” huh? Latinized “charuKH”? Where did they find that word? Do these guys know and speak the Armenian language? Do they know the word “ԴՐԵԽ/trekh”? “charuh” is furkish to mean slipper if you will, leather footwear. Even though I kind of knew those words I had to ask Hrachya. BTW, there are many so called Armenian families with surnames like “charukjian/charukhjian”.
Armatakan;

ՏՐԵԽ]= Շատ նման է Արաբերէն “turaq” կօշիկի կաշի , փապուճի կաշի… եւլն: տաճկ. (թրք) «չարըխ»..

Note. I cannot find it in the Persian dictionary so we will assume it is furkish.
Here is another inanity-Homanishneri Bararan;

ՏՐԵԽ=չարոխ, չարուխ, չքալ, ծարուխ

http://imgs.tootoo.com/fb/7e/fb7e462ad36466ef7606b06a5065767b.jpg
Edit: I just googled Տ ՐԵԽ and got 2200 hits all the way from Abovian, Bakunts, Dashtents and more

Edited by Arpa, 19 May 2010 - 06:25 AM.


#63 Zartonk

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Posted 18 May 2010 - 08:23 PM

I just wish PanARMENIAN would start making their articles LONGER THAN THE HEADLINE.

#64 Arpa

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Posted 18 May 2010 - 08:25 PM

I just wish PanARMENIAN would start making their articles LONGER THAN THE HEADLINE.

Yes Zartonk. That also they write in clear English and Armenian, not furk-anglo-russkarmiansky, so that we also understand. Is that why nobody takes us seriously?
Speaking of archeology, both Grgor and Vardan lived during the relatively modern historically rdecorded eras. Where are their burial grounnds and their remains?

Edited by Arpa, 18 May 2010 - 08:58 PM.


#65 Zartonk

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Posted 09 June 2010 - 10:33 PM

World's oldest leather shoe found in Armenian cave

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WASHINGTON – About 5,500 years ago someone in the mountains of Armenia put his best foot forward in what is now the oldest leather shoe ever found.
It'll never be confused with a penny loafer or a track shoe, but the well-preserved footwear was made of a single piece of leather, laced up the front and back, researchers reported Wednesday in PLoS One, a journal of the Public Library of Science.
Worn and shaped by the wearer's right foot, the shoe was found in a cave along with other evidence of human occupation. The shoe had been stuffed with grass, which dated to the same time as the leather of the shoe — between 5,637 and 5,387 years ago.
"This is great luck," enthused archaeologist Ron Pinhasi of University College Cork in Cork, Ireland, who led the research team.
"We normally only find broken pots, but we have very little information about the day-to-day activity" of these ancient people. "What did they eat? What did they do? What did they wear? This is a chance to see this ... it gives us a real glimpse into society," he said in a telephone interview.
Previously the oldest leather shoe discovered in Europe or Asia was on the famous Otzi, the "Iceman" found frozen in the Alps a few years ago and now preserved in Italy. Otzi has been dated to 5,375 and 5,128 years ago, a few hundred years more recent than the Armenian shoe.
Otzi's shoes were made of deer and bear leather held together by a leather strap. The Armenian shoe appears to be made of cowhide, Pinhasi said.
Older sandals have been found in a cave in Missouri, but those were made of fiber rather than leather.
The shoe found in what is now Armenia was found in a pit, along with a broken pot and some wild goat horns.
But Pinhasi doesn't think it was thrown away. There was discarded material that had been tossed outside the cave, while this pit was inside in the living area. And while the shoe had been worn, it wasn't worn out.
It's not clear if the grass that filled the shoe was intended as a lining or insulation, or to maintain the shape of the shoe when it was stored, according to the researchers.
The Armenian shoe was small by current standards — European size 37 or U.S. women's size 7 — but might have fit a man of that era, according to Pinhasi.
He described the shoe as a single piece of leather cut to fit the foot. The back of the shoe was closed by a lace passing through four sets of eyelets. In the front, 15 pairs of eyelets were used to lace from toe to top.
There was no reinforcement in the sole, just the one layer of soft leather. "I don't know how long it would last in rocky terrain," Pinhasi said.
He noted that the shoe is similar to a type of footwear common in the Aran Islands, west of Ireland, up until the 1950s. The Irish version, known as "pampooties" reportedly didn't last long, he said.
"In fact, enormous similarities exist between the manufacturing technique and style of this (Armenian) shoe and those found across Europe at later periods, suggesting that this type of shoe was worn for thousands of years across a large and environmentally diverse region," Pinhasi said.
While the Armenian shoe was soft when unearthed, the leather has begun to harden now that it is exposed to air, Pinhasi said.
Oh, and unlike a lot of very old shoes, it didn't smell.
Pinhasi said the shoe is currently at the Institute of Archaeology in Yerevan, but he hopes it will be sent to laboratories in either Switzerland or Germany where it can be treated for preservation and then returned to Armenia for display in a museum.
Pinhasi, meanwhile, is heading back to Armenia this week, hoping the other shoe will drop.
The research was funded by the National Geographic Society, the Chitjian Foundation, the Gfoeller Foundation, the Steinmetz Family Foundation, the Boochever Foundation and the Cotsen Institute of Archaeology at UCLA.

Edited by Zartonk, 09 June 2010 - 10:34 PM.


#66 Zartonk

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Posted 09 June 2010 - 10:36 PM

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#67 Arpa

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Posted 10 June 2010 - 07:07 AM

http://edition.cnn.c...?iref=allsearch

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http://www.youtube.com/uccireland

Armenian cave yields what may be world's oldest leather shoe
By Tom Watkins, CNN
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
5,500-year-old leather shoe found in Armenian cave
Footwear may have been left as offering
In 2 years since shoe was found, leather has hardened
RELATED TOPICS
Archaeology
Armenia
(CNN) -- Get a kick out of this: Researchers reported Wednesday finding the world's oldest leather shoe in a cave in Armenia.
The 5,500-year-old one-piece shoe antedates Stonehenge by a millennium and precedes every loafer, mukluk, wader, clog, bootee, stiletto, wingtip, mule, Oxford and cross trainer anyone has ever seen, according to Ron Pinhasi, a lecturer in prehistoric archaeology at University College Cork in Ireland.
The effort that resulted in the find dates to 2005, when Pinhasi and his team of archaeologists first entered the cave about an hour south of the capital city of Yerevan, in Vayotz Dzor province on the border with Iran and Turkey, and decided it looked promising.
Two years later, Pinhasi returned, dug down about half a meter and "started discovering everything," including rare, well-preserved organic material such as textiles, ropes and wooden stakes, leading them to redouble their efforts.
The next year, they excavated in a house that had been constructed inside the cave and found a pit covered with sheep or goat dung.
Below the dung, they found broken pottery and goat horns covering the shoe, said the authors, who published their findings in the online scientific journal PLoS ONE.
The right-footed, undecorated shoe -- today it would be a size 5 -- probably belonged to a woman, "but we cannot be certain; it could be a man with small feet," Pinhasi said.
A leather thong is stitched through four sets of eyelets in the back and 15 sets in the top. The shoe was lightly worn. Some of the eyelets have been recut, but the sole shows little wear.
"We thought originally it could be a discard, but at the same time, it's very strange, because we have only one shoe, and it's in very good shape," Pinhasi said. "It looks like it was more than likely deliberately placed in this way."
If so, it would join a number of other items that appear to have been placed as offerings. At the back of the cave, the archaeologists found pots full of grain and three pots, each containing the skull of a child -- their jaws removed.
"It's pretty weird," he said.
Two leather samples were taken: One was sent for carbon dating to the Oxford Radiocarbon Accelerator Unit at the University of Oxford and the other to the University of California-Irvine Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Facility; a piece of the straw was sent to Oxford.
Age estimates were the same for all three.
Pinhasi said he had no idea how common it would have been at that time for people to wear shoes.
His is the second-oldest shoe find; a pair of 7,500-year-old sandals made of fiber was found in Missouri, he said.
But that doesn't mean shoes were not commonly used. The fact that so little footwear from those days has been found could be explained by the fact that shoes don't tend to age well. Had it not been for the conditions inside the cave, the shoe would probably have disintegrated long ago.
Though temperatures in the region range from sweltering in the summer to icy in winter, the interior of the limestone cave remains a dry, consistent 20 degrees Celsius (68 degrees F), key to the shoe's survival, he said.
"What was exciting was that it is so complete and it looks so much like a modern shoe, with the eyelets and everything. Obviously, these people already knew how to make it."
And there was a level of sophistication in the product that he did not expect. The cow leather appeared to have been split and cured with a vegetable oil, said Pinhasi, who favors size 10½ Birkenstocks. "They actually look a little bit like the shoe," he said. "Not quite -- a bit more sophisticated."
The fact that the cave remained untouched for so many millennia is surprising. It can be seen from a heavily traveled road and is only about 300 yards from a fish restaurant, he said.
But government authorities are now posting a guard to keep away looters. "It's turning [out] to be sort of the most important site in Armenia," he said.
Though he wants to display the shoe in a museum in Armenia, he first wants to take it to Switzerland or Germany for preservation.
In the two years since the footwear was unearthed, the elements have taken a toll. "When it came out [of the ground], the leather was absolutely soft," the Israeli archaeologist said. "Now, it's hard as a rock."
But legislation does not exist in Armenia that would allow him to remove a national treasure from the country, so he is waiting.
Meanwhile, the shoe sits in the Institute of Archeology at the National Academy of Sciences in Yereva.
On Friday, Pinhasi plans to return to the region, this time to dig in a cave near the one that held the shoe.
"We want to see if it's unique," he said.
Even if nearby caves turn out to hold no such treasure, the 41-year-old researcher has plenty of work ahead of him. "We must have excavated about 2 percent of it," he said. "It could take decades" to finish.
Links referenced within this article

Archaeology
http://topics.editio...ics/Archaeology
Armenia
http://topics.editio.../topics/Armenia




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#68 Arpa

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Posted 13 June 2010 - 07:47 AM

I don’t want to make light of this . MY ONLY HOPE IS THAT THIS DOES NOT TURN OUT TO BE A PRANK even if independent labs have confirmed its age. Below Paul cites many “shoe sayings”. Let’s see how many shoe jokes and sayings we can find. smile.gif
http://asbarez.com/8...ts-wear-it-out/
Also se this; http://en.wikinews.o...a?dpl_id=190678
-----
- Asbarez Armenian News - http://asbarez.com -
If It’s A Hye Shoe, Let’s Wear It Out
Posted By Paul Chaderjian On June 11, 2010 @ 2:12 pm In Columns, Three Apples | 1 Comment
BY PAUL CHADERJIAN

Once there were and there were not … a fashionable shoe that is now known as “the world’s oldest shoe found in an Armenian cave.”
[1]And what was found in a cave in Armenia this week was not just the world’s oldest shoe, but there were scarves and pots and pans and two skulls with missing jaws. This story feels like Armenians have just put on a pair of new shoes, and everything feels alright (Nutini 2007).
Our ancestors were apparently not only fashionable, wearing moccasins in a style that survived for nearly six millennia, but they were also good at housekeeping and quite brutal. One of the skulls must have pulled a Helen Thomas and had his or her jaw yanked right off its face.
This bizarre headline of the day was bigger than the BP (beautiful people) oil spill for a split second. The story went viral, and it warrants all the clichés we can remember to use. So let’s capitalize on these rare gifts from the universe, because good PR comes too infrequently for our people. And criminal Armenians in the news hurt like brand new shoes (Sade 1983).
What other shoe stories can our people’s history and present day tell the world? What shoes are we filling that can help our people and the global population? Whose steps are we following and who is following in your footsteps? Where are all the goody-two-shoes (Ant 1981)?
The shoe is on our foot now, so we have to see what we can do with this instant headline. Let’s think big. Sex & the City III can be shot in Armenia. Its subtitle could be “the Oldest Armenian Shoe Romance Cruise on Lake Sevan.” Or Super Old Shoe, the superhero. Or Immigrants For (IV) – the shoes they stole. Or how about Shoe Tourism (Asbarez 2010)?
The fact that the story of the world’s oldest shoe being found in Armenia doesn’t happen every day. Maybe it happens once in the history of Earth?
This got me thinking. How little do we know about what people find interesting in the Armenian world. I also realize how little I must know about my ancestors that a dung-covered shoe makes me proud. And how fast do we embrace anything Armenian just because it’s in the headlines!
Maybe before our people discovered pointed shoes were cool, we had better fashion sense. Maybe God spoke to Noah about what proper footwear was when He told the old man to pack his family and animal friends into the Arc. Perhaps this was Noah’s right shoe? Could it be? But if this was Noah’s shoe, what happened to the left shoe and the jaws missing from the skulls?
And what do we know about the fashion sense of our ancestors who walked in and out of those ancient monasteries and architectural marvels? Did they all wear fashionable shoes? Were there multiple colors of leather? Were there different styles? Did people show off their shoes to each other as a sign of affluence and trend-setting? Were there fashion trends three thousand years before Christ? What great fashion secrets are buried on the grounds of our ancestral Homeland that have yet to be unearthed and studied? Who will break the fashion trend news sooner? E! and TMZ or Hollyscoop?
Inquiring minds want to know (That cliché is courtesy of 80s TV commercials that also gave birth to “Where’s the Beef,” and “When EF Huffington speaks, people listen.” Actually, it was EF Hutton, but it’s 2010).
Now back to Shusho (no, not the singer)…
So many questions about these shoes and not many answers. And gosh darn it, the day after the news was announced, there were more articles surfacing about how this shoe in Armenia was not the oldest shoe since there was a shoe in Missouri that was dated to be at least 10,000-years-old. There went my instant excitement for our Homeland’s instant claim to fame.
Don’t you love walking in my shoes (Depeche Mode 2006).
And what about this fascination that was sparked by this ancient shoe. Apparently everyone has wanted to read the story, and from the BBC to the Associated Press were journalists speaking the word Armenia within proximity of the words ‘oldest shoe in the world.’ There were interviews on CNN and the story turned out to be the most popular one on Armenian websites.
Among the facts reported were that the shoe was at least 5,500 years old. The cave was in Vayots Dzor, southeast of Yerevan. And the shoe was covered by sheep and deer poop.
Why did the oldest shoe story make everyone so excited? Did it reaffirm for Armenians our excellent fashion sense? Why did non-Armenians find this oldest shoe story so interesting? Was it because we imagined that Noah and his party crew didn’t wear shoes? Was it because the skulls had no jaws? Or was it because the shoe was stuffed with grass so that it would retain its shape?
Act your age not your shoe size (Prince 1986).
Can you imagine the flocks of scientists and anthropologists that can now be attracted to our Homeland? Can you imagine the funding new digs will receive? Can you imagine the thousands of headlines that can be unearthed when modern-day scientists study ancient-day Armenians? If our shoes predate the Pharaoh’s, we can be the rock stars of the universe, and no longer walking like an Egyptian (Bangles 1986).
I love my narcissistic self, don’t I? Yes, I do (Pinsky 2009).
And if there was one shoe in one cave, what’s the likelihood of us finding more oldest, older than oldest, less old than the older shoe in the world. Perhaps there’s a tourism industry here: Shoe Travel.
Maybe there’s even a Travel Channel series in tracking the oldest shoe in the world. Samantha Brown would be a good hostess to tap in search of places to sleep and eat when going on a Oldest Shoes Tourism Trip. Samantha would even lure Anthony Bourdain and that Man vs. Food guy could be challenged to see how many skewers of khorovadz and how many khacapuris he can down in one sitting in the middle of Republic Square.
We’re really onto something now. And it all started with the drop of one oldest shoe story on the Internet. What will happen when the second shoe drops? Between the first and second shoe, we have a lot of homework to do. If our ancient shoe is this popular, can you imagine what we can do with the really interesting shoe stories from the Homeland?
Let’s put our best foot forward (Overbury 1613).
And three shoes fell from heaven: one for the storyteller, one for him who made him tell it, and one for you the reader.
PS Knock Knock. Who’s there. Hye Shoe. Bless You

Article printed from Asbarez Armenian News: http://asbarez.com
URL to article: http://asbarez.com/8...ts-wear-it-out/
Click here to print.
Copyright © 2010 Asbarez Armenian News. All rights reserved.


Edited by MosJan, 19 October 2017 - 12:33 AM.

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#69 Arpa

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Posted 13 June 2010 - 10:02 AM

I can’t find the words to Chem ou Chem, Chem krna khaghal/ Չեմ ու չեմ, չեմ կրնայ խաղալ: Կօշիկիս, կօշիկիս ծանրութենրն չեմ կրա, կրնայ խաղալ:
Aram K. uses the tune in one of his suites in the Ballet Gayane which I cannot find either.
Meanwhile see this about “koshik/mashik”.
Hi Imelda Marcos/ Իմելդա Մարկոսեան :P :D
Alao remember Cinderella's Glass Slippers. ;)
---
ՎԱՐԴ ԿՈՇԻԿՍ

Ձայնագր. և մշակում` Կարա-Մուրզայի


Վարդ կոշիկըս, վարդ կոշիկըս,
Վարդից գեղեցիկ մաշիկըս:

Աղջ.
- Մեր տան մեջը քնող տղա,
Կարմիր խնձոր ծախող տղա,
Վարդ կոշիկըս գտնող տղա,
Տըղա', ղըրկե' վարդ կոշիկըս:

Տղա
- Ձեր տան մեջը քնել չեմ ես,
Կարմիր խնձոր ծախել չեմ ես,
Վարդ կոշիկըդ գտել չեմ ես,
Իմ մոտ չէ քո վարդ կոշիկը:

Աղջ.
- Լավ օրս եկավ ա՜խ ու վա՜խ,
Կորցուցի կոշիկըս, ավա՜ղ,
Հայի տղա հոգուդ մատա՜ղ
Տըղա, ղըրկե' վարդ կոշիկըս:

Տղա
- Որ մոտս չէ` ուրտի՞ց ճարեմ.
Ազնիվ աղջիկ, հոգիդ սիրեմ,
Եթե գտնեմ, հետ կուղարկեմ,
Իմ մոտս չէ վարդ կոշիկըդ:

Աղջ.
- Մի' մնար ինձի պարտական,
Աղջիկ եմ, տասնչորս տարեկան.
Ես կըլինեմ քեզ սիրեկան,
Տըղա', ղըրկե' վարդ կոշիկըս:

Տղա
- Ինչո՞ւ մընամ քեզ պարտական,
Կամիս` տամ հազար դահեկան,
Եթե կըլնես ինձ սիրեկան,
Ես կըճարեմ վարդ կոշիկըդ:

Edited by Arpa, 13 June 2010 - 10:05 AM.


#70 Arpa

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Posted 30 June 2010 - 09:18 AM

Yes. Upon further DNA analyses and CAT scans they saw these letters -
Q A J N A Z A R and S S S
http://www.panorama..../06/30/arm-gen/

18:54 30/06/2010 » Society
Armenian cave yields world's oldest, 6000-year-old human brain
A human brian was found in an Areni cave in the Armenian province of Vayotz Dzor what is believed to be the world’s oldest human brain, Professor of California University, co-chair of the group conducting excavations in Areni cave, Grigori Areshyan, told reporters in Yerevan Wednesday.

He said the DNA taken from the 6000-year-old human brain is being studied in many laboratories worldwide, including the US and the Netherlands, and the results will become clear late in 2011.

“We are conducting research to find the Armenian gene. First we should get the result of the genotype, and it should still be long studied,” he said.

Grigori Areshyan highlighted: “As long as the research has not finished, we haven’t informed foreign media about the finding. The world’s oldest human brain was found in Areni cave in September, 2008.”

Source: Panorama


Edited by Arpa, 30 June 2010 - 09:18 AM.


#71 Johannes

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Posted 30 August 2010 - 11:30 AM


Հայկական և իռլանդական մշակույթի նմանության հետքեր են գտել Տիգրանակերտում

Տիգրանակերտի տարածքում իրականացված պեղումների ժամանակ հայտնաբերվել են Իռլանդական հայտնի «բարձր խաչերի» նախօրինակները։ Այս մասին լրագրողներին այսօրվա ասուլիսին տեղեկացրեց Արցախի հնագիտական արշավախմբի ղեկավար, պատմական գիտությունների դոկտոր Համլետ Պետրոսյանը։

«Մի շարք գիտնականներ տարիներ շարունակ փորձում էին հայկական խաչքարի մշակույթը կապել իռլանդական խաչերի հետ, սակայն նմանատիպ հայկական հուշարձաններ չէին գտնում», – ասաց նա՝ պարզաբանելով, որ իռլանդական խաչերը պատված են շրջանակով։

Տիգրանակերտի տարածքում կատարված պեղումների արդյունքում նույնպես հայտնաբերվել են շրջանակների մեջ խաչեր։

Արշավախմբի ղեկավարը հավելեց, որ նա այս թեմայով հոդված է պատրաստել, որը շուտով պետք է լույս տեսնի Իռլանդիայում։

Թերթ



Վերջինը Տիգրանակերտում յայտնաբերուածն է: Առաջին երեքը՝ Իռլանդական «High Cross» խաչքարի տեսակն է: Նման չեն:
Յովհաննէս


Attached Files


Edited by Johannes, 30 August 2010 - 11:32 AM.


#72 Zartonk

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Posted 31 August 2010 - 10:38 PM

Թեև պեղված քանդակը հերու է թվում Իռլանդական Կելտիք խաչքարներից, այնուամենայնիվ նրանց եզակի դերը որպես մոնոլիտային քարէ խաչի միայն ներկայացուցիչներ արևմտյան եվրոպայում մտածմունքի առիթ է ստեղցում: Իսկ չմոռանանք այս հրաշալի օրինակը, որը մեր համեստ կարծիքով ավելի համապատասխան նմուշ է համեմատումի համար:
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#73 Johannes

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Posted 01 September 2010 - 12:27 AM

Շնորհակալութիւն խաչքարի նկարի համար: Յետեւը երեւում է հայ եկեղեցու գմբեթ, արդեօք ո՞րտեղից է գտնուել այս խաչքարը:



#74 Arpa

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Posted 08 September 2010 - 08:02 AM

ՔԱՐԱՀՈՒՆՋ եւ ՊՈՐՏԱՍԱՐ

Karahunj and Portasar

http://www.azg.am/im...0-201016213.jpg
http://www.panorama....9/07/stonhenge/
Armenia most ancient astronomy center in the world: scientist
Armenia was the most ancient astronomy center in the world, candidate for biological sciences, senior fellow of “Stones and Stars” Armenian expedition group in Oxford University, Vachagan Vahradyan, told reporters today.

With over 7500 years’ history, Qarahunj, situated in Syunik, Armenia, served as basis for his conclusion. He said, the recent study allows to claim that the Armenian Qarahunj is even older that the English Stonehenge, claiming about 300 years’ history.

Qarahunj is a combination of huge vertical triangular stones. According to the specialist, both monuments have identical construction. Both have holes directed to the NE and in the past these allowed to find the day which was to mark the beginning of the year.

“This evidences that the constructors had the same culture values and astrology skills. This is of serious and essential significance,” he said. Both Qarahunj and the Stonehenge are observatories. As far as the similarity of the names goes, it’s beyond doubt that the Armenian “qar” (stone) and the English “stone” mean the same.

Scientific research in Qarahunj got underway in 2006 and the materials have been sent to Oxford. British scientists got greatly interested in the monument and a number of researchers are intent to arrive in Armenia from Oxford University next week to carry out 2-week-long study of the complex with the Armenian scientists.

http://www.azg.am/AM/2010090822


«ԱԶԳ» ՕՐԱԹԵՐԹ #162, 2010-09-08
Օրվա հետքերով
ԲԱՑԱՀԱՅՏՈՒՄՆԵՐ ՔԱՐԱՀՈՒՆՋՈՒՄ
Հայաստանըՙ հնագույն աստղագիտական կենտրոն

Հայ-բրիտանական «Քարեր եւ աստղեր» ծրագրի հայաստանյան արշավախմբի գլխավոր գիտական խորհրդական Վաչագան Վահրադյանն արդեն երկար ժամանակ հետազոտում է Քարահունջը: Հետազոտություններով բացահայտվել են հուշարձանի եւ Կարապի համաստեղության կապը, հուշարձանի աստղագիտական նշանակության վարկածն ու կապը անգլիական Սթոունհենջի հետ: Սրանք ու էլի մի շարք փաստեր Վահրադյանն ուղարկել է Օքսֆորդի համալսարան. պատասխանը չի ուշացել. փաստերը հետաքրքրական են, համագործակցությունը` անհրաժեշտություն:
Վերջին շրջանում գրեթե ամեն շաբաթ Վահրադյանը նոր բացահայտումներ է արել. Նա համոզված է, որ հայկական Քարահունջն ավելի հին ծագում ունի, քան Սթոունհենջը:
Հնագետները Քարահունջին վերագրում են 3800-ամյա պատմություն, հենվելով այնտեղ հայտնաբերված իրերի վրա, մինչդեռ Վահրադյանի մաթեմատիկական եւ աստղագիտական հաշվարկների հիման վրա Քարահունջն ունի շուրջ 7000-ամյա պատմություն:
Զուգահեռներ անցկացնելով Քարահունջի եւ Սթոունհենջի միջեւ, Վահրադյանը շեշտում է երկու կառույցների նմանությունը: Հայկական եւ բրիտանական կառույցներում հստակ ուրվագծվում են դեպի հյուսիս-արեւելք ուղղված քարե միջանցքները, որոնք հնարավորություն են տալիս պարզելու ամառային արեւադարձի օրը: Նրա ներկայացմամբ, սա փաստում է, որ երկու կառույցների հեղինակներն էլ միեւնույն մշակութային արժեքների կրողն են եւ լավ տիրապետել են աստղագիտությանը:
Վահրադյանը մեջբերում է Տրոյան հայտնաբերած Հենրիխ Շլիմանի խոսքերը. «Եվրոպայի ողբերգությունն է, որ իր քաղաքակրթության հիմք ընդունեց ոչ թե հայկական, այլ հին հունական մշակույթը»: Շլիմանը ոչ միայն հավասարեցնում էր երկու մշակույթներ, այլեւ նախապատվությունը տալիս էր հայկականին: Հայկական մշակույթի եւ հին շրջանում քաղաքակրթության առաջնորդողի լավագույն օրինակներից մեկն էլ Արեւմտյան Հայաստանի Պորտասար վանական համալիրն է: Համադրելով երեք կառույցների լուսանկարները, քարերի ձեւն ու համաստեղությունները, Վահադյանը փաստում է, որ հուշարձանները կարծես միմյանց շարունակությունը լինեն: Երեք կառույցների քարերի վրա պատկերված է համաստեղությունների բաժանված աստղային երկինքը` Անգղի (Կարապի) համաստեղության շուրջը: Հնագետ Կարլ Շմիդտը կառույցին վերագրում է 12.000 տարվա պատմություն, ինչը փաստում է, որ Հայկական լեռնաշխարհում Աստղային երկինքը համաստեղությունների էր բաժանված 12.000 տարի առաջ:
Այսօր թուրքերը հայկական Պորտասար վանական համալիրն անվանում են Turkish Stonehenge եւ ներկայացնում որպես թուրքական աստղագիտության ժառանագություն: Թուրքական խեղաթյուրման դեմ գիտնականները ոչինչ չեն ձեռնարկում:
Մյուս շաբաթ Հայաստան կժամանի Օքսֆորդի համալսարանի պատվիրակությունը` աշխարհագրագետ, հոգեբան, մաթեմատիկոս, աստղաբաններ: Պեղումները կտեւեն շուրջ 2 շաբաթ:
Մինչ գիտնականը փորձում է աշխարհին մատուցել Քարահունջի հսկայական արժեքը, այնտեղ մարդիկ ոչխար են արածացնում: Թեպետ կառույցն ընդգրկված է հուշարձանների պահպանման ցանկում, սակայն ոչ միայն անվտանգությունը, այլեւ պահակի ներկայությունն ապահովված չէ: Անտարբերության պարագայում հուշարձանի 35-րդ քարը վերջերս գողացել են:
ՀԱՍՄԻԿ ՀԱՐՈՒԹՅՈՒՆՅԱՆ

http://www.azg.am/AM/2010090822
© AZG Daily, 2008
----
Above we see the mention of “Portasara’. I can’t find much about it, Google will open several . It litrally means “Navel Summit” (navel as in belly button). Those other people have renamed it “Gobekli Tepe” , a literal translation. It is in the neighborhood of Edessia/Urfa. It does not show on paper maps , but you can see it at the Smithsonian URL below .

Պորտասար
http://artmamul.arar...enter.org/?p=16

http://www.smithsoni...ekli-tepe.html#
http://upload.wikime...

Hey Harut, do your ancestors know anything about it?

#75 Arpa

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Posted 08 September 2010 - 08:30 AM

SASUNTSI DAVID’s grave found?
Do you know the Armenian word ԱՅՐՈՒՁԻ/Ayroudzi. No, not “aryoutsi/lion”. It means Horseman (literally “man-and horse“), Cavalier, Chevalier.
http://www.armeniape...it-alexouns.jpg


Posted Image


------
ARMENIAN EPIC HERO'S GRAVE AND OLDEST HORSE BURIAL PLACE FOUND IN THE REPUBLIC OF ARMENIA
Eva Sahakyan

YerevanReport.com
Sept 7 2010
Armenia

YEREVAN, September 7-Armenian archeologists discovered an ancient
burial place of a horse during archeological excavations on the
territory of the Republic of Armenia. Hakob Simonian, the director
of the Research Center of Cultural and Historical Heritage, told the
journalists about this.

According to him, the excavations were found in the Nerkin Naver
necropolis, which is 3.5 km to the west of Ashtarak.

"This find dates back to the 26-25th centuries BC, and it's the
oldest burial place of a horse discovered to this day. It has an
all-important significance not only for Armenia, but for the whole
Western Asia as well," Simonian said.

The archeological find testifies that Armenians used horses for
military purposes. Simonian mentioned that horse is the animal that
defined the development of humanity, and its domestication can be
associated with the establishment of civilization.

During the excavations in Nerkin Naver, the Armenian archeologists
discovered another burial place that resembles the grave of one of
the heroes of the famous Armenian national epic poem Sasuntsi David
("David of Sassoon").

Simonian says that the burial place is surprisingly rich, proper only
for heroes. A lion claw was found under the head of the buried man,
and according to the epic poem, a lion skin was put under Lion-Mher's
(Aryudz Mher) head. According to Simonian, this find can imply that
the epic poem has a real-life basis.

"Expensive arms were also found in the burial place, a valuable saber
among them, which is indeed a rarity. One more time this emphasizes
the fact that the buried man wasn't an ordinary man," Simonian added.

The Nerkin Naver necropolis counts 30 burial places. Seven burial
places have already been examined and the excavations of the 8th one
are being carried out.

#76 Arpa

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Posted 10 September 2010 - 04:13 PM

Thank you Armenian Patriot and welcome.
Tigranakert;
http://www.youtube.c...152/RDXJF90DwhM

#77 Arpa

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Posted 12 October 2010 - 08:42 AM

Posted Image


Mr. Bigfoot and Mrs. Bigmouth;

Posted Image

And now , let us see who has the bigger foot and who the bigger mouth.
No , no this is not under the Topic Comedistan. This is serious business and sadly hurtful.

http://www.armeniano...st_leather_shoe

T

12.10.10 | 16:06
Shoe of discord: Archeologists and officials divided over care of ancient artifact

World's oldest shoe
By Gayane Mkrtchyan
ArmeniaNow reporter
Armenian archeologists are worried about the future of the world’s oldest (5,500-year-old) leather shoe, found in a cave in Armenian province Vayots Dzor in 2008. It has not been fully examined yet; conservation issues of the shoe are not settled, and specialists are indignant that government officials take no steps to preserve it.
The shoe which is now displayed at the Yerevan History Museum, was found during the excavations in a cave conditionally called Areni-1 which is part of The Arpa River Valley Monument. The expedition consisted of representatives from three countries – Armenia, Northern Ireland, and the United States. News of the world’s most ancient shoe first appeared in mass media last June, and within two days at least 3 billion readers learned of it from posts on CNN and other sites. Now, however, hard feelings, perhaps bruised egos, and apparent carelessness by the Ministry of Culture delay the possibility of exposing even more significant treasures discovered in Areni that would arguably serve to put Armenia in the world spotlight. Boris Gasparyan, of the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography at the RA National Academy of Sciences, head of the Armenian archeological expedition, is extremely concerned about the further examination of the ancient shoe and says he himself had time enough only to estimate the age of the shoe and learn a little bit about how it was made, before it was taken custody by the state history museum. “It is impossible to carry out another kind of examination of the shoe in Armenia, because of the lack of proper laboratories, equipment and specialists,” he says. The historical shoe is currently hosted by the Yerevan History Museum. Director of the museum Anelka Grigoryan says that the shoe is preserved with appropriate light and temperature regime, and there is no need to worry. However, specialists are still worried. Archeologist Gregory Areshian, head of the American expedition, says when the shoe was discovered, it was well-preserved, but now it must be conserved. “It will start getting dry and in some ten years it will completely fall apart,” says Areshian. According to the order by which archeological excavations are held, artifacts must be delivered to the State two years after the excavations. Gasparyan says that the legislation regulating archeology is imperfect; there is no law on archeology in Armenia. According to that order, it is the head of the expedition who must decide which museum the artifact must be delivered to, something that has not been the case with the oldest shoe. “Nobody asked me anything. The Minister of Culture phoned our director and said that the President of Armenia [Serzh Sargsyan] wanted to see the shoe. We suggested that they come and see it at our institute. But they said it was not appropriate, so it was decided to take the shoe to the museum and register it. And once it is registered we do not have legal right to deal with it anymore,” says Gasparyan. Areshian says that the museum and the Ministry of Culture of Armenia must take care of the conservation issues. According to him, international institutions specializing in conservation of leather items can provide technical assistance to Armenia in this regard. The Public Relations Department of the Ministry of Culture told ArmeniaNow to address all shoe-related questions to the Yerevan History Museum. The director of the museum said they have turned to certain restoration centers (in Oxford and Germany) for assistance and are waiting for their response. “We are currently discussing the issue of further examination and maintenance of the shoe with the Restoration Center of Matenadaran [Mesrop Mashtots Institute of Ancient Manuscripts] to make the right decision about which laboratory to turn to,” says director of the museum Grigoryan. Gasparyan says, however, that New York’s Metropolitan Museum, one of the world’s most famous archeological centers, offered to fully examine the shoe, restore it and exhibit for six months as a compensation for their expenses, and later return the shoe to Armenia. “It would be very much in our country's best interest; after all something Armenian would be displayed in a place like that. I have received a similar offer from Israel, too,” says Gasparyan, who has not submitted these offers to the director of the museum, because he is offended by their behavior. “I do not initiate anything myself, because I do not want to work with that museum,” he says. “Here the lack of law is essential. It is an archeologist’s right to further work with the artifact since it is an archeologist who has excavated it.” The expedition has discovered that 39 caves in the cave complex of Vayots Dzor were once populated. Besides the shoe, well-preserved wooden, bone and leather objects, a clothing item, even human soft tissues and human body remnants were found in Areni. The head of the expedition has a preliminary agreement with the administration of the Sardarapat Ethnological Museum, where he is planning to give the rest of the objects for display. “The director [of Sardarapat Museum] assisted us with great pleasure and joined our program. That's the right way to work, and not just coming and taking away the artifact without asking and pulling administrative levers,” Gasparyan says. The archeologist says that there are other artifacts which may cause an even greater stir. Almost fully preserved mutton and sheep fur were found in the cave. They are waiting for dating results. Gasparyan believes that it is 6,000 years old, which would mean that it was a mummy, and it is older than all Egyptian mummies. “It would be a sensation. I am sure the way I was sure in case of the shoe, and insisted that it was an artifact dating back to the Copper Age (7000-5000 BC),” Gasparyan explains.



#78 Zartonk

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Posted 12 October 2010 - 11:13 AM

The highlighted passage is truly sad. Turks are busy filling their pockets with "Turkish Stonehenge", and we are waiting for someone to come and tend our house.

#79 Arpa

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Posted 03 November 2010 - 10:17 AM

Tigranakert, Artsakh
<a href="http://hyeforum.com/...hl=tigranakert" target="_blank">http://hyeforum.com/...tigranakert</a>
MosJan had posted the following in the above thread, lamenting that it was in (French) not English;
<a href="http://www.francekar...ikranakert.php" target="_blank">http://www.francekar...anakert.php</a>
Beside it being very informative and pictorial I noticed a very interesting tid bit. Observe the picture showing several mounds in the background and read tha cation. Remember when we were talking about “tmouk/tmbouk” in “Tmkaberd”? See what they call those mounds- “TUMULUS”!!!

This is SAD very SAD, makes one to cry! :msn-cry:
You mean to tell me that we waste zillions of Drams to build a ridiculously useless dolphinarium in the heart of Yerevan, next to the hallowed grounds of the Pantheon no less, but we don‘t have funds for valuable projects of the kind??
Read below wher it is suggested that this project has not only historicalvalue but political as well, to show the world that the land was inhibited by Armenians 2 thousand years before we heard of asszies and furks.
Also note that the said site is in the vicinity of what was once known as aghdam which was recently renamed AKNA.

http://hyeforum.com/...showtopic=31394
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Please click on the picture gallery to see the artifacts.

http://www.armeniano...kert_excavation

Features | 03.11.10 | 13:17
Digging Up Discontent: Archeologists frustrated over lack of support for Tigranakert excavation

Courtesy of Artsakh Archeological Expedition
Archeologist Hamlet Petrosyan and his team working at site.
By Gayane Abrahamyan
ArmeniaNow reporter
Authorities in Nagorno Karabakh have plans to turn the 50 hectare excavation site of the ruins of Tigranakert – an ancient city founded by Armenian King Tigran the Great in the 1st century BCE – into a tourist destination. Meanwhile, members of the archeological excavation team at the site are puzzled as to why Armenian authorities have not realized the political capital the site holds.
The archeologists say Tigranakert is evidence of the land belonging to Armenians centuries before the area became a battleground for rights to claim Karabakh. They say their findings historically refute Azerbaijan’s insistence that it has always been Azeri territory. The Azeri position is that Armenians were never settled in Karabakh until the 19th century. For five years, head of Yerkir Miutyun (Country Union) NGO Sevak Artsruni – the initiator of the archaeological excavation – has said that Tigranakert is not simply an important monument, it is a serious political argument enabling Armenian authorities to give a grounded response to Azerbaijan's frequently voiced claims that Armenians are newcomers. Hamlet Petrosyan, who led the Artsakh Archeological Expedition of the Institute of Archeology and Ethnography (the RA National Academy of Sciences) said Armenian authorities have responded “with indifference” to the significant discoveries at Tigranakert. Earlier this year a museum displaying the artifacts found during the excavation opened at the site which is now equipped with multi-language information panels, set up on the initiative of the Karabakhi government. The excavation continues, supported since 2008 by the Karabakh government (30 million drams ($83,000) a year) and receives about 12,000 visitors a year, according to the NKR Tourism Department. The outline of the ancient city, covered by a thick layer of earth over the centuries, is now open to view. From a 20-kilometre distance one can see the citadel’s defensive walls, stretching for 120 meters and reaching 5 meters in height at certain points of the wall. Besides the wall, ruins of a medieval basilica, an ancient residential district and a tomb field have been partly unearthed. This year in spring the museum of Tigranakert artifacts opened at the renovated hall of the 18th century castle of Persian Panah Khan which stands next to the city ruins. Some 200 items, which are only part of the artifacts found as a result of five years of excavation, are displayed at the museum. Twenty five illustrated information panels in three languages (Armenian, English, Russian) are installed there telling in detail how the site was discovered, inform the visitor about the archeological research, the history and the plan of the ancient city, etc. One of the most recent archaeological finds – a 600 litre clay jar unearthed at the ancient residential district of Tigranakert two months ago – will soon be among the museum exhibits. Archaeologist Petrosyan stresses that the excavations did not have any political pursuit, and that the main driving force was to find one of the six cities built by King Tigran the Great, according to Armenian written records. However, he says that “It is an important argument for our country as it solidifies our position. It’s impossible not to reckon with the existence of an Armenian city the northern defensive wall of which stretches for 120 meters; all of this is clearly visible from the Azeri outposts, so they cannot deny it anymore.” Azerbaijan’s response, as expected, was to reject the findings. In 2005, Hudrat Ismailzade, head of Archaeology and Ethnography Department at Baku State University, said: “We once thoroughly researched the now occupied authentic Azeri territories, so no matter how much they dig the Armenians cannot find any traces of their ‘ancestors’ in Karabakh”. When later the news about the discovery of Tigranakert spread and the results of the excavation were presented to different countries, Azerbaijan’s Academy of Sciences declared that it is not Armenian and that it is the “Afghan Tigranakert”. “Well, that was to be expected, that’s understandable, what does not make sense is the indifference of our Academy of Sciences; there have even been cases when it made attempts to hinder the excavation,” says Petrosyan. Part of the artifacts from Tigranakert are now at the laboratory of the Yerevan State University, because the Academy refused to provide its laboratory, nor did it offer financial support to the expedition. “International organizations refuse to support these excavations, since they are carried out in an unrecognized state, however the same attitude is shown by the Armenia-based Armenians,” says Petrosyan with frustration. The team has turned to several commercial companies and organizations in Armenia, and the President’s Office trying to get money to continue the work. So far, none has been realized. The RA Ministry of Culture says it is unaware of any financial needs the Tigranakert expedition has. The head of the MOC public relations department said that they highly appreciate the accomplished work; nonetheless the ministry is not planning to show financial assistance in the nearest future. http://www.armeniano...kert_excavation


Edited by Arpa, 03 November 2010 - 10:41 AM.


#80 Arpa

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Posted 09 November 2010 - 03:01 PM

ՔԱՐԱՀՈՒՆՋ եւ ՊՈՐՏԱՍԱՐ

Karahunj and Portasar

http://www.azg.am/im...0-201016213.jpg
http://www.panorama....9/07/stonhenge/
Armenia most ancient astronomy center in the world: scientist
Armenia was the most ancient astronomy center in the world, candidate for biological sciences, senior fellow of “Stones and Stars” Armenian expedition group in Oxford University, Vachagan Vahradyan, told reporters today.
and the Stonehenge are observatories. As far as the similarity of the names goes, it’s beyond doubt that the Armenian “qar” (stone) and the English “stone” mean the same.

Scientific research in Qarahunj got underway in 2006 and the materials have been sent to Oxford. British scientists got greatly interested in the monument and a number of researchers are intent to arrive in Armenia from Oxford University next week to carry out 2-week-long study of the complex with the Armenian scientists.

http://www.azg.am/AM/2010090822


«ԱԶԳ» ՕՐԱԹԵՐԹ #162, 2010-09-08
Օրվա հետքերով
ԲԱՑԱՀԱՅՏՈՒՄՆԵՐ ՔԱՐԱՀՈՒՆՋՈՒՄ
Հայաստանըՙ հնագույն աստղագիտական կենտրոնշաբաթ:
Մինչ գիտնականը փորձում է աշխարհին մատուցել Քարահունջի հսկայական արժեքը, այնտեղ մարդիկ ոչխար են արածացնում: Թեպետ կառույցն ընդգրկված է հուշարձանների պահպանման ցանկում, սակայն ոչ միայն անվտանգությունը, այլեւ պահակի ներկայությունն ապահովված չէ: Անտարբերության պարագայում հուշարձանի 35-րդ քարը վերջերս գողացել են:
ՀԱՍՄԻԿ ՀԱՐՈՒԹՅՈՒՆՅԱՆ

http://www.azg.am/AM/2010090822
© AZG Daily, 2008
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http://www.smithsoni...ekli-tepe.html#
http://upload.wikime...

Hey Harut, do your ancestors know anything about it?

!




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