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New Promising Era "President" & VP Nikol Pashinian

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#581 Yervant1

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Posted 04 October 2022 - 08:59 AM

 TIME 
Oct 3 2022
 
The U.S. Might Be the Surprising Determining Factor in the Future of Armenia
 
 
OCTOBER 3, 2022 2:39 PM EDT
Maghakyan is a Visiting Scholar at Tufts University and Executive Director of Save Armenian Monuments

Few would be surprised to hear that the United States is involved in supporting a democratic nation that was recently invaded by its authoritarian neighbor. But many Americans are likely unaware that their country is doing so for two such post-Soviet nations: not just Ukraine, but also Armenia, which has been suffering from Azerbaijan’s invasion for almost three weeks now.

The two situations are not unrelated. A key factor behind the ongoing U.S. engagement in Armenia is Russia’s visible absence in a region that the latter considers its backyard. But the U.S. isn’t simply trying to push Russia out from the post-Soviet South Caucasus. Rather, Washington seems to have realized just how serious the threat is—not just for Armenia, but for the world.

 

In the early minutes of Sept. 13, as families across eastern Armenia slept, Azerbaijan launched the unprovoked shelling of three dozen Armenian towns with heavy artillery and unmanned combat drones. The two countries have been locked in off-and-on hostilities for decades over the disputed Nagorno-Karabakh republic, but Azerbaijan’s regime now seems to take advantage of its rival’s military unpreparedness and global, especially Russian, distraction. Azerbaijan attempted to deny having attacked within Armenia’s borders, but the onslaught was so intense that NASA’s fire-management satellites detected massive thermal anomalies. In just two days, Azerbaijan’s forces killed over 200 Armenians, primarily soldiers, according to official government counts. Videos spread by the invaders appeared to show them giggling while mutilating fallen Armenian women, and executing Armenian soldiers who had surrendered.

Read more: Inside Azerbaijan’s Grand Plan To Make the Disputed City of Shusha a Cultural Capital

 

Further details of the incursion came via Armenia-based journalists and officials alike. On Sept. 14, foreign journalists reported having come under Azerbaijani shelling in the Armenian town of Sotk, which is nowhere near military installations. The following day, at the United Nations Security Council emergency hearing, Armenia disclosed that, despite the prior day’s ceasefire, Azerbaijan is amassing additional troops, including in Nakhichevan, Azerbaijan’s exclave bordering southwest Armenia. This would open a second invasion front. On Sept. 23, Western embassies in Yerevan issued still-active “travel warnings” for southern Armenia and beyond, insinuating that they expected further attacks. Still, many media outlets across the world lack on-the-ground regional journalists, so the news from Armenia largely stayed off the mainstream radar.

It was not until U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s visit to Armenia the weekend of Sept. 17, in support of Armenian “security and democracy” against Azerbaijan’s “illegal and deadly attacks,” that it became fully clear that the U.S., in a dramatic transformation, is fully engaged, albeit probably only diplomatically, in preventing existential threats against Armenia.

pelosi-armenia.jpg?quality=85&w=1024
Armenia's Head of the Parliament Alen Simonyan ® and U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (L) attend a joint press conference in the Parliament in Yerevan, Armenia, on Sept. 18, 2022.
 
Karen Minasyan—AFP via Getty Images

Jackie Speier, one of the two Armenian-American Congresswomen to accompany Speaker Pelosi, recalled at a large Armenian-American gathering in Los Angeles on Sept. 25 that in Armenia she told their dinner host, the Prime Minister, that she didn’t want another girl to feel the way she did growing up: reluctant to identify as Armenian because her homeland, then part of the USSR, did not appear on a world’s map. As the Congresswoman announced at the gathering, she is introducing a resolution in condemnation of and accountability for Azerbaijan’s war crimes and aggression, following a similar motion by prominent House Democrat Adam Schiff, and a bipartisan Senate resolution introduced by key Senators Bob Menendez and Marco Rubio. But this is not about internal electoral politics.

More significantly—especially as Congress has been historically attentive to Armenian American constituency concerns—the White House has now transformed its traditionally “both-sidist” rhetoric on the conflict. It was the U.S., not the regional hegemon Russia, that played the key role in halting Azerbaijan’s Sept. 13-14 aggression. Since then, the Biden Administration has initiated numerous meetings for and with Armenian and Azerbaijani officials, both in person and on the phone, despite threats by Azerbaijan’s authoritarian president—who has made Armenophobia his power-consolidation formula since inheriting the presidency in 2003—that “no one and nothing can stop us.”

U.S. engagement may also come as a surprise given that Armenia is formally part of CSTO (Collective Security Treaty Organization), Russia’s failed mini-version of NATO. Preoccupied with its failing invasion of Ukraine and forced mobilization of troops, Russia is both unable and unwilling to defend its treaty ally Armenia today. But in 2020 and 2021, during previous rounds of aggression by Azerbaijan, Russia likewise chose not to do more to defend its ally, despite having had the military might to do so. On paper, Russia is democratic Armenia’s security guarantor. In reality, Russia and Azerbaijan, two fossil fuel-rich authoritarian states, are much closer; the unwavering support for the latter by Turkey, which has become an ever-more important partner for Russia given western sanctions, complicates Russia’s support for Armenia even more.

Today, the U.S. appears to realize that a preoccupied Russia’s temporary absence in the Caucasus means potential involvement from not just Turkey but also Iran, which has warned against border changes; it has a northern border with Armenia, a secure lifeline to Europe. A potential Turkey-Iran confrontation resulting from Azerbaijan’s invasion of Armenia could result in an unmanageable destabilization of the Middle East and beyond, something that neither Russia nor the U.S. want.

The U.S.’s recent involvement in the Caucasus is unprecedented. For the very first time since the Cold War, it’s the actions of a country other than Russia that matter most right now in the region. Will Washington succeed in preventing a full-scale invasion of democratic Armenia? Is it willing to make sacrifices to meet that goal, such as selling defense weaponry to Armenia and sanctioning Azerbaijan, despite intense Turkish pressure and European energy needs? The only public American sacrifice over the last three weeks in defense of Armenian existence appears to have come from the outgoing U.S. Ambassador to Armenia. On Sept. 28, Lynne Tracy risked her safety to travel to Syunik, Armenia’s southmost region, despite her own embassy’s travel warning against visiting the entire region.

Earlier, President Joe Biden announced that he would nominate Tracy to serve as U.S. ambassador to Russia, a testament to her courage and to the necessity of a deeper understanding of Moscow through those who are most dependent on it. Perhaps Washington realizes that if it fails to thwart Azerbaijan’s next aggression, it will leave Armenia with no choice but to further integrate with Russia. Similar circumstances a century ago, in the aftermath of the Armenian Genocide, helped to revive the collapsed Russian empire into the USSR.

With the possibility of further violence hanging over their talks, the foreign ministers of Armenia and Azerbaijan met in Geneva on Oct. 2, as Azerbaijani special forces reportedly neared Armenia’s borders. Hostilities may resume any moment, given that Azerbaijan’s autocrat seems to have few reasons for restraint. At the Oct. 1 unveiling of a new gas pipeline to Europe, E.U. leader Ursula von der Leyen praised Azerbaijan as “reliable”; Europe, facing the energy impacts of its determination to punish Russia, appears willing to embolden another authoritarian aggressor. The U.S., at least in rhetoric, seems to be slightly more cautious.

Whether the history—of unrealized western promises pushing a vulnerable Armenia closer to Russia—will repeat itself, this time as a cruel joke, largely depends on where American leadership goes next.

https://time.com/621...us-involvement/



#582 Yervant1

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Posted 05 October 2022 - 07:52 AM

The Critic
UK - Oct 4 2022
 
 
Armenia’s lonely plight

Why don’t we care?

 

Imagine for a moment that we own adjacent flats. You are a little nervous around me because my rich cousin lives in the penthouse suite nearby, and I’m a bit of a bully. One day I go to the landlord and demand the use of your garage, and the landlord makes us share the garage whilst putting it under my name. Many years later you have the chance to challenge that, but the landlord doesn’t recognize what you have done. I continue to fight you on it, often with dirty tactics, until one day I decide I need half of your flat — the nice half, with the living room, kitchen, safe, front door, windows. Because it was always part of my apartment really. But it’s okay, you can still have the guest room to sleep in. You see, I need it to have a whole apartment the way I imagined it — and to connect it to my cousin’s suite. Makes sense, right? You will sign it over to me, right? 

I hope you see and feel the lack of justice in this scenario. In this story I just told, the people involved are all nation states, and the houses are the land owned by those states. I could be talking about two current conflicts. The first has been in the news a lot recently: the war between Russia and Ukraine. In the second scenario, the landlord is also Russia. My cousin is Turkey. You are Armenia, and I am Azerbaijan. Despite the similarities between the two conflicts, the response by the US, UK and EU countries (the West) has been completely different. In order to understand why, we need to look at some history.

The roots of Armenia can be traced back to 2-3000 BC. The Armenian Empire reached its height as an empire in 100 BC under Tigran the Great, who was said to have conquered much of Syria and Lebanon. He was even considered the primary enemy of the Roman Empire for a time. The lands that are traditionally Armenian-controlled and populated are shown here: 

Untitled.jpg?auto=compress,format&crop=fMap of Ancient Armenia

Modern Armenia is only a sliver of what you see above. The western part was conquered by the Ottoman Empire in 1555, and the Armenians living there were killed — starting in the 1880s and culminating in the Armenian Genocide of 1915–17. The eastern part of Armenia was first conquered by the Persian empire, and then the Russian empire in the 1820s. The first Republic of Armenia was formed out of the eastern part and existed briefly after the Bolshevik revolution of 1917, until 1920 when the same Red Army conquered it again, forming Armenia SSR. At the same time, Joseph Stalin gave the area we know as Nagorno Karabakh (or Artsakh to Armenians) to Azerbaijan SSR. 

The first Nagorno Karabakh war was fought in the early 1990s, during the collapse of the USSR. It was a long and bloody war with atrocities on both sides, and it resulted in the formation of the self-determined, independent Republic of Artsakh. This republic had its security backed by Armenia, but formed its own government and military. Artsakh was not recognized by the UN or most of the world. Over the last 30 years Azerbaijan and Armenia have had intermittent clashes over the disputed region, culminating in the 44 day second Nagorno Karabakh war (2nd NK war) in 2020. In this war Azerbaijan conquered half of the territory of Nagorno Karabakh until a cease-fire was brokered. Despite two years of negotiations, no peace treaty has been signed to formally end the conflict.

The difference is the complete lack of an international response

This war is important for understanding the current conflict, and it is also an important precursor to the war in Ukraine. It was a war over a disputed region, which was also how the war in Ukraine started. It was the first war that saw significant use of drones in combat, to lethal effect. The war also involved heavy misinformation campaigns by both sides, with continuous efforts to withhold information, lie and discredit the other side. Like the Russo-Ukrainian War, in the 2nd NK war a much bigger country attacked a much smaller one (Armenia has three million people, Azerbaijan has 10.1 million and Turkey 82 million). But there was an important difference from the Russo-Ukrainian War: the complete lack of an international response. Despite the unmitigated aggression from one side, the international response was always “both sides, stop”. When there were reports of war crimes by Azerbaijan (white phosphorus use, torture and killing of prisoners, intentional targeting of historical monuments), nothing was done

In the intervening years between the end of the second Nagorno Karabakh war and the fighting which started on 13 September, there has been a series of peace negotiations, the most recent of which was in Brussels. Azerbaijan has negotiated in anything but good faith. During the summer of 2021 they decided to advance their border several kilometres into Armenia’s territory, which cut off Armenia’s primary north-south highway. The Russian Peacekeepers assigned did nothing until Armenia counterattacked. There has been intermittent shelling of small villages in Nagorno Karabakh. There has also been the systematic elimination of Armenian churches and artefacts dating back to as long ago as the 5th century, as documented by Caucasus Heritage watch. After the destruction Azerbaijan would simply claim that there was no evidence that the lands were Armenian and that they were always Azerbaijani lands. Azerbaijan also returned a fraction of the POWs taken, after holding kangaroo court trials for some. Others simply disappeared. Then Azerbaijan created a monument for the war over the helmets of dead Armenian soldiers: 

pngzJcCKWIA_x.png

Azeri President Aliyev in the memorial to the 2nd Nagorno Karabakh war

What was the international response during this time? To reward Azerbaijan. Baku was a common location for sporting events, and Azerbaijan participated in most other important European social events during that time — including Eurovision. Azeri President Aliyev’s wife (also the vice president) is the current regional head of UNESCO. Most importantly, Azerbaijan recently received a huge natural gas contract from the EU. 

Almost immediately following this gas deal, Armenia received these demands at the next peace conference: 

Nikol Pashinyan is the current Prime Minister of the Republic of Armenia. It at least seems that as a direct result of the increased revenue and relations with the European Union, Azerbaijan decided that they could bite off a huge chunk of Armenia, including the capital of Yerevan. Yerevan has over one third of the nation’s population and a large portion of its business interests. 

pnghmoKfAhRgA.png

Armenian Cities Attacked 9.13.22

All of this led to the resumption of hostilities on 13 September, when Azerbaijan shelled multiple cities in the Republic of Armenia — whose locations are shown in the map above. This aggression included attacks on two major Armenian military bases in the area and the seizure of 65 square kilometres of territory. In 2-3 days of fighting, Armenia reported over 500 casualties and Azerbaijan reported 360. Fortunately, a humanitarian cease-fire has been signed, which unlike in 2020 has lasted more than 12 hours. Damningly for Azerbaijan, there have been reports and videos of war crimes committed. Several Armenian soldiers were filmed being treated for non-fatal wounds and then returned dead to their families days later. There is also a video that was posted on Telegram by Azeri special forces of a woman soldier being horrifically mutilated, whilst the soldiers laugh and celebrate. 

Only tangible action will stop Azerbaijan from pillaging Armenia

In the days since the ceasefire has been signed, four big things have happened around the conflict. First, the CSTO rejected Armenian pleas to intervene. (The CSTO is the former Soviet Bloc’s answer to NATO.) Second, Aliyev, Putin, Erdogan and the other regional autocratic leaders met in Sochi. Third, Azerbaijan started building up more forces on the Armenian border. Lastly, Nancy Pelosi and a US congressional delegation visited Yerevan. The timing of the visit is very interesting, and could signal the US seeing a chance to have a strategic partner in the region whilst Russia is tied up elsewhere. Whilst having the third in line for the US presidency visit Yerevan is a huge step, what actions will follow? Will the US stop military support to Azerbaijan? Start sanctions? Send aid or troops to Armenia? In light of the other events that have happened, it will take tangible action to stop Azerbaijan from pillaging Armenia. 

Several years ago an article in the Economist quoted a Yemeni man in the middle of war and drought and famine saying they had “no one but Allah”. It was profound and heartbreaking to me that the major powers of the world cared so much for the oil and relations of Saudi Arabia that they — that we — did nothing whilst a small, poor country suffered and died. Now, the same dilemma faces us again. Will we stand by whilst another poor small country perishes, for the sake of the aggressor’s resources? Right now we are in bed with the dictatorship. Azerbaijan ranks near the bottom in all practical freedom rankings: freedom of press, freedom of religion, governance et cetera. Yet, whilst we sanction those next to them on the list, we are friends with Azerbaijan. 

That same question was asked earlier this year when Russia attacked Ukraine. The choice was made by the US, UK and EU countries to sanction Russia and side with Ukraine. That choice came at the cost of ending many longstanding trade agreements and no longer having access to Russian natural gas. Why has the West abandoned its principles now?



#583 Yervant1

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Posted 06 October 2022 - 08:51 AM

Insider Paper
Oct 5 2022
 
 
Armenia PM says to meet Azerbaijan leader, Macron, EU chief this week
 

Armenia’s Prime Minister Nikol Pashinyan said Wednesday he would meet arch-foe Azerbaijan’s President Ilham Aliyev for talks this week in Prague also attended by EU chief Charles Michel and French President Emmanuel Macron.

The announcement came days after Armenian and Azerbaijani foreign ministers met for talks in Geneva to begin drafting the text of a future peace treaty.

It highlights the growing Western engagement in the volatile Caucasus region, where Russia — distracted by its war in Ukraine — is visibly losing influence after decades of domination.

Baku and Yerevan fought two wars — in 2020 and in the 1990s — over the contested region of Nagorno-Karabakh, an Armenian-populated enclave of Azerbaijan.

“A quadrilateral meeting is planned between Armenia’s prime minister, the presidents of Azerbaijan and France and the president of the European Council,” Pashinyan told parliament in Yerevan.

He didn’t specify the exact date of the meeting, but said he would be travelling to Prague for the meeting of the European political community scheduled for Thursday.

He also announced a separate meeting with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, an ally of Azerbaijan.

Last month, at least 286 people were killed on both sides before a US-brokered truce ended the worst clashes since the neighbours’ 2020 war.

The six-week war in 2020 claimed the lives of more than 6,500 troops from both sides and ended with a Russian-brokered ceasefire.

Under the deal, Armenia ceded swathes of territory it had controlled for decades, and Moscow deployed about 2,000 Russian peacekeepers to oversee the fragile truce.

With Moscow increasingly isolated on the world stage following its February invasion of Ukraine, the United States and the European Union have taken a leading role in mediating the Armenia-Azerbaijan normalisation process.

Pashinyan and Aliyev last met in Brussels on August 31 under the mediation of Michel.

When the Soviet Union collapsed in 1991, ethnic Armenian separatists in Nagorno-Karabakh broke away from Azerbaijan. The ensuing conflict claimed around 30,000 lives.

 


#584 MosJan

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Posted 06 October 2022 - 10:06 AM



#585 MosJan

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Posted 06 October 2022 - 03:24 PM



#586 MosJan

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Posted 06 October 2022 - 03:29 PM



#587 MosJan

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Posted 06 October 2022 - 05:57 PM



#588 Yervant1

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Posted 07 October 2022 - 09:13 AM

Armenpress.am
 

Spanish Congress issues a statement expressing solidarity with the Armenian people

 
 
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1094297.jpg 18:17, 6 October 2022

YEREVAN, OCTOBER 6, ARMENPRESS. In the October 6 plenary session, the Congress of Deputies of Spain unanimously adopted a statement of support for the Armenian people, reaffirming its intolerance towards military operations, ARMENPRESS reports the Armenian Embassy in Spain presented the text of the statement, which was supported by all 350 deputies.

 

The statement reads as follows,

 
 

“Taking into account the aggression carried out by the units of the armed forces of Azerbaijan on the night of September 12-13 against the Armenian positions of Goris, Sotk and Jermuk settlements of Armenia using artillery and drones, which resulted in the death of at least 207 Armenian servicemen,

The Congress of Deputies of Spain

  1. Reaffirms its intolerance towards military operations that represent a serious violation of international law, assessing them as unjustified aggressions that undermine regional security and stability.
  2. Promotes the commitment of the parties to observe the ceasefire signed within the framework of international relations.
  3. Expresses solidarity and support to Armenia and its people. We are sorry for the loss of life on both sides, we express our deep sorrow for the victims and the unnecessary suffering of the population. We also send this sympathy to the Armenian community in Spain.
  4. Supports the efforts of the EU High Representative and the Special Representative in the South Caucasus, who have an important role in the process of monitoring the maintenance of the ceasefire agreement and contribute to the search for a negotiated, comprehensive and lasting solution to the conflict.
  5. Calls on the parties to respect international law, put down the arms and resume diplomatic negotiations, thereby reaffirming that this position is the only viable and lasting solution to this complex and historic dispute.
  6. Calls on the EU to redouble its efforts to promote de-escalation and peace through diplomatic means."
 
 


#589 MosJan

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Posted 07 October 2022 - 03:44 PM



#590 Yervant1

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Posted 08 October 2022 - 07:22 AM

France 24
Oct 7 2022
 
 
EU to send 'civilian mission' to Armenia to help mark borders with Azerbaijan
 
 
 
The European Union will send a "civilian EU mission" to Armenia to help delineate the borders with Azerbaijan, stakeholders announced Friday after a meeting with France in Prague.
 

The mission will start in October for a maximum of two months, according to a joint statement issued after talks between Armenian Prime Minister Nikol Pashinyan, Azerbaijani President Ilham Aliyev, French head of state Emmanuel Macron and European Council President Charles Michel.

"There was an agreement by Armenia to facilitate a civilian EU mission alongside the border with Azerbaijan. Azerbaijan agreed to cooperate with this mission as far as it concerned," the statement said.

It added that the mission's aim "is to build confidence, and... contribute to the border commissions".

The three leaders and the European Council president had met for several hours late Thursday night on the sidelines of the first gathering of the "European Political Community" in Prague.

They also said that Armenia and Azerbaijan had confirmed their commitment to the UN charter and "the Alma Ata 1991 Declaration through which both recognize each other's territorial integrity and sovereignty".

Arch-foes Armenia and Azerbaijan have long been locked in a decades-long territorial dispute over the Nagorno-Karabakh region -- situated in Muslim-majority Azerbaijan with mostly Christian Armenian residents.

Last month, at least 286 people were killed on both sides before a US-brokered truce ended the worst clashes since 2020, when simmering tensions escalated into all-out war.

It claimed more than 6,500 lives in six weeks before a Russian-brokered ceasefire saw Armenia cede swathes of territory it had controlled for decades.

The two ex-Soviet neighbours have long seen Moscow's influence in the volatile Caucasus region.

But Moscow is visibly losing sway as it turns its attention to Ukraine -- allowing for the United States and the European Union to take a leading role in mediating the Armenia-Azerbaijan normalisation process.

(AFP)

https://www.france24...with-azerbaijan 



#591 Yervant1

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Posted 08 October 2022 - 07:24 AM

pngnQ4jCGCVqt.png
Oct 7 2022
 
 
Turkish, Armenian leaders go ahead with first-ever face-to-face meeting
By Ani Mejlumyan in Yerevan October 7, 2022

In their first-ever face-to-face meeting, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and Armenian Prime Minister Nikol Pashinyan discussed prospects for the normalisation of relations between their countries as well as regional security matters.

The encounter took place in Prague on October 7 on the sidelines of a European Political Community (EPC) summit initiated by France.

The Armenian government’s press office said that Pashinyan and Erdogan discussed “possible further steps” towards establishing diplomatic relations between their nations and the opening of the Turkish-Armenian border, which has been kept unilaterally closed by Turkey since 1993.

A statement from the office read that Pashinyan urged a quick implementation of recent agreements to open the border to citizens of third countries and to allow mutual cargo shipments by air. Turkish and Armenian envoys reached interim agreements for these steps in July.

“Views were also exchanged on regional processes,” added the Armenian readout of the meeting. It did not elaborate.

Following the summit, Pashinyan tweeted: 

"In Prague I reconfirmed again our proposal on unblocking of all regional communications. 

@Azerbaijan again did not respond positively. I reiterate, @Armenia is ready for unblocking of all regional communications with full respect of our sovereignty and legislation."

The Turkish presidency reported no details of the talks. It said only that Erdogan “received” Pashinyan.

Erdogan and other Turkish leaders have repeatedly demonstrated that the normalisation of Turkish-Armenian relations is contingent on Armenia accepting Azerbaijan’s key demands. Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu said Yerevan must recognise Azerbaijani sovereignty over Nagorno-Karabakh and open a land corridor to Azerbaijan’s Nakhchivan exclave through the Syunik province of Armenia, which borders Iran. Iran, in its turn, has proved strongly against this corridor.

“We will do what we have done until now,” Erdogan told RFE/RL in Prague when asked about the main obstacles to Turkish-Armenian normalisation.

Photos of a pre-talks informal sit-down, circulated on social media, showed Pashinyan sitting at the same table with Erdogan and Azerbaijani President Ilham Aliyev and chatting with them in the lobby of the presidential palace in Prague, where the European summit was held.

https://www.bne.eu/t.../?source=turkey



#592 Yervant1

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Posted 08 October 2022 - 07:27 AM

pngbEeqzOqwqF.png
Oct 7 2022
 
 
Armenia and Azerbaijan agree to recognize each other’s territorial integrity and sovereignty
Daniel Stewart 
Following a meeting brokered by French President Emmanuel Macron and European Council President Charles Michel, the leaders of Armenia and Azerbaijan have agreed to commit to the UN Charter and the 1991 Alma Ata Declaration through which both countries recognize each other's territorial integrity and sovereignty.
 

This was confirmed by the Elysée in a communiqué issued in the early hours of Friday morning, after the French President had announced hours earlier a meeting with the Prime Minister of Armenia, Nikol Pashinian, and the President of Azerbaijan, Ilham Aliyev.

 

"Armenia and Azerbaijan have confirmed their commitment to the UN Charter and the 1991 Alma Ata Declaration, by which they mutually recognize their territorial integrity and sovereignty," reads the missive issued by the French Executive, which details that the agreement will serve as a basis for a forthcoming meeting of the Border Commissions to be held at the end of October.

However, Armenia has agreed to facilitate the establishment of a European Union civilian mission on the border with Azerbaijan, while the Azeri government has agreed to cooperate with this mission on its side.

The mission will start in October and last for a maximum of two months. The objective of the mission is to build confidence and, through its reports, to contribute to the border demarcation commissions, the Elysée has detailed.

https://www.msn.com/...nty/ar-AA12FVCL



#593 Yervant1

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Posted 08 October 2022 - 07:31 AM

Armenpress.am
 

Azerbaijan can no longer make territorial claims, must pull back troops from occupied parts of Armenia – Marukyan

 
 
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1094345.jpg 11:12, 7 October 2022

YEREVAN, OCTOBER 7, ARMENPRESS. Armenia’s Ambassador at-large Edmon Marukyan issued a statement following the meeting between Armenian Prime Minister Nikol Pashinyan, Azerbaijani President Ilham Aliyev, French President Emmanuel Macron and President of the European Council Charles Michel.

 

“Azerbaijan has agreed to cooperate with the EU civilian mission which will be dispatched along the border. Therefore, any possible future aggression by Azerbaijan will be monitored on the ground, furthermore the part of Armenia’s sovereign territory that is already under Azerbaijani occupation will be recorded. Let me remind that on 5 October, 2022 the EU High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy Josep Borrell said that the EU wanted to send a monitoring mission to the line of contact but the mission wasn’t dispatched because Azerbaijan opposed it.

 
 

Azerbaijan agreed to recognize Armenia in accordance with the UN Charter and the Alma-Ata Declaration, after which Azerbaijan can no longer make any territorial claims against the sovereign territory of Armenia in the delimitation process, which also means that the Azerbaijani military must withdraw from the territories it has occupied until this moment,” Marukyan said in the statement.

 

 

https://armenpress.a...ws/1094345.html



#594 MosJan

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Posted 08 October 2022 - 11:09 AM

at the talks aliev talked about a map that was made in 1920s. interesting to know what map it is.. 
also wasnt Artsvashen  & getashen part of republic of Armenia ? 



#595 Yervant1

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Posted 11 October 2022 - 08:07 AM

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Oct 10 2022
 
 
Opinion | Russia’s shifting interests are leaving Armenia out to dry
clock_088f7a37.png 10 October 2022
 

During the latest Armenia–Azerbaijan war, Russia deviated from its long-term alliance with Armenia, reneging on its formal commitments and instead offering inaction and equivocation. Its weak response takes place against a backdrop of military disaster and shifting interests. 

 

In the early hours of 13 September, Azerbaijan launched its largest attack on Armenia since the end of the Second Nagorno-Karabakh War. 

Hours after hostilities broke out, Armenia’s Security Council held an extraordinary session, and made the decision to apply to both the Collective Security Treaty Organisation (CSTO) and Russia for assistance, the latter based on a Treaty of Friendship, Cooperation, and Mutual Assistance signed in 1997. 

The CSTO, whose treaty states that an attack on one member will be considered an attack on all, responded by holding an emergency meeting to discuss the escalation. Rather than providing military support, as stipulated in the treaty, the organisation decided that a ‘fact-finding mission’ headed by the CSTO’s secretary general, Stanislav Zas, would be dispatched to Armenia to assess the situation. 

This response meant that the CSTO once again chose performative gestures over real action. Neither before the arrival of the mission to Armenia, nor after its departure, did the CSTO call Baku out for its unprecedented attack. 

Russia also made it clear from the beginning that it would not take sides in this new escalation.

All official statements coming from Moscow have been kept neutral, despite evidence and consensus that, on this occasion, Armenia’s sovereign territory had been attacked by Azerbaijan. In its first statement following the outbreak of hostilities, the Russian foreign ministry focused on the need to delimit and demarcate the Armenian-Azerbaijani border, despite the fact that towns well within the sovereign territory of Armenia had been shelled by Azerbaijani forces. 

Even Azerbaijani shelling of a Russian border guard facility in Armenia’s Gegharkunik Province failed to shift Moscow’s rhetoric. 

In the end, Armenia received no actual assistance from its alleged allies.

The towns of Goris, Kapan, Jermuk, and Vardenis, in Armenia’s southern and eastern provinces, were heavily shelled for two days, and Azerbaijani armed forces occupied a swathe of Armenian territory. More than 200 Armenian servicemembers and civilians were killed or remain missing. 

A ceasefire was reached 44 hours after it broke out  reportedly through US mediation. Russia’s voice remained a notable absence from the dialogue. 

Why was Russia not involved?

There are a few obvious reasons for Russia and the CSTO’s inaction in the face of the deadliest escalation since the end of the Second Karabakh War; most notably, its decreasing military capacity and shifting interests in the region.

The war in Ukraine has been the Kremlin’s number one priority since it began, and the recent Azerbaijani attack against Armenia took place at almost the same time as a significant Russian military loss on the Kharkiv front

Tied up in Ukraine, Russia has no intention of taking sides in the Armenia–Azerbaijan conflict or getting involved in any sort of confrontation with Baku, let alone Ankara. 

And Moscow’s military failures in Ukraine appear to have emboldened the Aliyev regime. Knowing that Armenia’s main ally has its focus and military might elsewhere, Azerbaijan has used the power vacuum in the South Caucasus to test the red lines of both Russia and the international community. 

Russia has also become increasingly dependent on both Turkey and Azerbaijan as it attempts to mitigate the consequences of Western sanctions; Ankara is a key trading partner for Moscow and has been vital to keeping Russia’s economy afloat.

In early August, Russian President Vladimir Putin and his Turkish counterpart Recep Tayyip Erdoğan met and agreed to grow foreign trade between the two countries to $100 billion by 2030. At a meeting between the leaders on 16 September, Putin announced that Turkey had also agreed to pay for 25% of its Russian gas imports in roubles.

Days before the outbreak of hostilities, Russia, Azerbaijan, and Iran signed a declaration in Baku on the development of a ‘North-South’ international transport corridor. This corridor, which would stretch from Saint Petersburg to Mumbai via Baku and Tehran, became vitally more important for Moscow after its invasion of Ukraine, and the sanctions that followed. Russia aims to make up for its loss of access to European markets by branching into Asia, and relies on Azerbaijan’s cooperation for this to take place. 

north-south-corridor-10-10-2022.jpgThe 'North-South' corridor Source: Eurasian Development Bank

Russia’s interests have also shifted as it pushes deeper changes in the region, particularly reestablishing transport links between Armenia and Azerbaijan. 

This process was agreed upon in the trilateral statement signed by Russia, Armenia, and Azerbaijan that brought an end to the Second Nagorno-Karabakh War in November 2020.

But in the years and months since, the sides have been unable to agree on how the normalisation of transport would actually be implemented. 

Yerevan has repeatedly expressed an interest in reestablishing all transport links that existed during the Soviet Union, but stresses that this process should be implemented with respect towards the sovereignty and national legislations of the countries involved, as well as in accordance with international norms. 

Meanwhile, Baku wants a corridor through southern Armenia that would connect mainland Azerbaijan with its exclave of Nakhichevan and would be controlled by the Russian Federal Security Service (FSB). Yerevan has declared on multiple occasions that the creation of an extraterritorial corridor on Armenia’s territory is out of the question. 

Russia is interested in opening the corridor because it wants a safe land connection with Turkey through the territory of Azerbaijan and Armenia. De facto control of the corridor would also increase Moscow’s leverage in both Baku and Yerevan. 

Russia’s relative weakness and growing dependence on the Turkish-Azerbaijani tandem, as well as its desire to preserve its role as an impartial broker in the Armenian–Azerbaijani context are the primary reasons for the Kremlin’s inaction during the latest escalation. 

As Moscow is the primary decision-maker in the CSTO, the organisation did as it usually does, and fell into line with the Kremlin’s plan of action. 

What does this mean for Armenia?

Russia and the CSTO’s passive behaviour during the latest escalation sparked outrage in Armenia, driving the country’s leaders and population to question the country’s membership of the CSTO and its formal alliance with Moscow. 

Several pro-Western political parties have organised rallies in Yerevan, demanding that Armenia leave the CSTO, while senior Armenian officials including Speaker of the National Assembly Alen Simonyan and Secretary of the Security Council Armen Grigoryan have publicly expressed their disillusionment with Russia and the CSTO’s conduct.

Even Prime Minister Nikol Pashinyan hinted at Yerevan’s dissatisfaction with Russia and the CSTO during his speech at the 77th session of the UN General Assembly. Armenia also sent a clear message about its discontent by refusing to participate in exercises of the Collective Rapid Reaction Forces of the CSTO that were held in Kazakhstan from 26 September–8 October.

[Read more on OC Media: Opinion | Armenia’s old allies have failed it, new ones have yet to appear]

These developments are a huge blow to Russia’s standing in Armenia. At this point, even pro-Russian actors in Armenia have begun to realise that Moscow is not capable of fulfilling its obligations towards Yerevan. 

It’s become clear to almost everyone in Armenia that the Russian deterrent isn’t working, and that the CSTO has once again been proven to be an absolutely dysfunctional alliance. 

Armenia was a founding member of the organisation and always saw it not only as a framework for interaction with Moscow, but also as a practical military arrangement — CSTO membership was supposed to guarantee Yerevan Russian weapons at favourable prices. 

But Russia has reneged on that too, as the country is not just unable to sell weaponry and armaments because of the war in Ukraine, but may also have failed to fulfil existing contracts. 

Nonetheless, it is highly unlikely that Armenia’s leadership will initiate a process of withdrawal from the CSTO or drastically change its foreign policy direction in the near future. 

Azerbaijan’s tactics of coercive diplomacy and continuous aggression against Armenia have put Yerevan in a very precarious position. 

Armenia doesn’t have the luxury of being able to anger or further alienate Russia in the face of renewed conflict with Azerbaijan, and any attempt to leave the Russia-led defensive alliance would likely cause retaliation from Moscow.

Russia has a significant military presence on the ground in Armenia and Russian peacekeepers play a key role in preserving the fragile peace in Nagorno-Karabakh. 

These are factors, which cannot be ignored by decision-makers in Yerevan, make it likely that Armenia will remain a formal Russian ally and a member of the CSTO for the foreseeable future. 

However, Russia’s relative weakness and inability to deter Azerbaijan will also be taken into account. In this new context, Yerevan has more room for manoeuvre in its foreign policy and security alliances — something it is already making active use of. 

Following the most recent outbreak of war, the number of meetings between Armenian senior officials and their Western counterparts was a clear indicator of Yerevan’s new Westward leanings. While Armenia may not be looking to leave Russia’s fold in the immediate future, the country’s inaction has begun a process of diversification in Armenia’s foreign policy. It remains to be seen how this will take shape in the months and years to come. 

 

tigran-grigoryan-cropped.jpg

Tigran is a political analyst based in Yerevan. He is a columnist and host of the ‘Artsakh Perspective’ show at CivilNet and is the author and host of ‘Focus on Russia’ at Infocom. He previously worked at the Office of Armenia’s Security Council from 2020 to 2021.


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#596 MosJan

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Posted 12 October 2022 - 11:01 AM



#597 MosJan

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Posted 12 October 2022 - 06:02 PM

is SOB's like this aren't eliminated we will not be soon

#598 MosJan

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Posted 12 October 2022 - 06:02 PM



#599 Yervant1

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Posted 13 October 2022 - 08:07 AM

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Oct 11 2022
 
 
Turkey's stance complicates potential peace between Armenia, Azerbaijan
By linking Turkey’s normalization with Armenia to a peace settlement between Armenia and Azerbaijan, Erdogan could encourage intransigence on Baku’s part.
Fehim Tastekin
 

The recent meeting between the leaders of Turkey and Armenia — the first in 13 years — has rekindled the prospect of normalization between the two estranged neighbors, with anticipation buoyed further by Armenia and Azerbaijan agreeing to a civilian European Union mission to help demarcate their disputed borders. 

Armenia’s territorial conflict with Azerbaijan and its disputes with Turkey have grown into an entangled, ossified problem in the past three decades. Though a solution remains an uphill task, the cost of perpetuating the status quo has grown since the 2020 war between Armenia and Azerbaijan, turning up the pressure for lasting peace.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, his Azerbaijani counterpart, Ilham Aliyev, and Armenian Prime Minister Nikol Pashinyan met on the sidelines of a European gathering in Prague Oct. 6, after which the Turkish and Armenian leaders held bilateral talks. The last high-level meetings between the two countries took place in 2008 and 2009, producing a deal to establish diplomatic ties and reopen their border that eventually failed to go through.

Erdogan said after the meeting that Turkey was ready to reopen its border with Armenia and help revive transport links as soon as Yerevan and Baku reach a peace deal. This amounts to Turkey readjusting its terms and conditioning normalization with Armenia on the conclusion of Azerbaijani-Armenian peace. Previously, Ankara sought Armenia’s withdrawal from occupied Azerbaijani territories — a condition that materialized as a result of the 2020 war over the Nagorno-Karabakh enclave in which Turkish military assistance helped Azerbaijan prevail. 

Of particular interest to Erdogan is a prospective transport link between Azerbaijan and its exclave of Nakhchivan, which is separated from the mainland by a strip of Armenian land and shares a tiny border with Turkey. For Ankara, the route — often referred to as the Zangezur corridor — would secure a shortcut to Central Asia.  

Erdogan said Pashinyan made certain requests that would be discussed by the two countries’ foreign ministers and special envoys. The special envoys have met four times since January. Their fifth meeting, which was scheduled for September, fell through amid a new bout of Azerbaijani-Armenian clashes.

Al-Monitor has learned that Pashinyan asked for Erdogan’s help to secure the release of prisoners of war and in delineating the Armenian-Azerbaijani border. Pashinyan, the sources said, wants the border to be drawn on the basis of the Soviet-era map rather than the pre-Soviet one, which would cause Armenia to lose territory. Erdogan, for his part, raised the issue of the transport corridor and reiterated that Yerevan should end its international campaign to have the Ottoman-era massacres of Armenians recognized as genocide.

In Prague, Pashinyan and Aliyev also held four-way talks with French President Emmanuel Macron and European Council President Charles Michel, which produced an agreement on a civilian EU mission on Armenian territory alongside the border. According to a statement issued after the meeting, the mission, starting in October for two months at most, aims “to build confidence and, through its reports, to contribute to the border commissions.” The next border delimitation talks will take place in Brussels by the end of October, it said. 

The mission proposal had been advanced by EU foreign affairs chief Josep Borrell, who accused Azerbaijan of “unacceptable” actions earlier this month, saying that it was shelling Armenian territory, destroying infrastructure and “occupying positions in Armenia.” 

Aliyev appears to have agreed to the mission under EU and US pressure, having previously rejected EU monitoring at the border. The peace process has accelerated and the working groups should now start drafting the peace agreement, he said after the meeting.

The initiatives in Prague generated a skeptical response from Russia, which sees the southern Caucasus as its backyard. Western approaches to the Azerbaijan-Armenia conflict “do not seem to be quite balanced,” Russian Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova said, adding that some Western actors “cannot even be called peace mediators.” Moscow delivered its own settlement proposals to Baku and Yerevan in September, she noted.

From Ankara’s perspective, the ball is now in Yerevan’s court and Pashinyan is supposed to hold out against domestic opposition to press ahead. He is well aware that this could prove a political suicide. Nevertheless, domestic objections could ease amid growing misgivings among Armenians over Moscow’s mediation role after the Russia-led Collective Security Treaty Organization failed to step in over the fighting in September.

Rapprochement with Turkey is a logical path for Pashinyan as he tries to get rid of Russian influence. For his part, Erdogan could hardly find another Armenian leader as inclined to make peace as Pashinyan. 

Aliyev’s posture, however, has been rather supercilious, emboldened by Turkish support tipping the balance of power in his favor. This narrows Pashinyan’s maneuvering room and could require Ankara to press Baku for flexibility if it is to make its win-win rhetoric convincing. After the Prague talks, Pashinyan said Azerbaijan “did not respond positively” to his proposal on “unblocking all regional [transport] communications with full respect of our sovereignty and legislation.” The Armenian leader has given the nod to the Zangezur corridor — though he refuses to term it as such — but is opposed to ceding any sovereignty rights to Azerbaijan such as controlling vehicles or collecting fees along the route.

Aliyev’s hitherto approach has promised nothing but a full debacle to Armenia. Hence, Erdogan’s assertion that Turkey has no preconditions of its own and Pashinyan should reconcile with Aliyev makes no real contribution to advancing the process. Linking Turkey’s normalization with Armenia to a peace deal between Armenia and Azerbaijan leaves Turkey without an independent road map or keeps it from using its weight to entangle the knot in the southern Caucasus. As such, Erdogan’s policy could bolster Aliyev’s inclination to use force and stir up the hawks in Armenia.

On Nagorno-Karabakh, for instance, Aliyev has refused to discuss the status of the region’s Armenian population, including any form of autonomy. “The Armenians will have the same rights as the citizens of Azerbaijan. … And if for some reason this does not suit someone, they can choose another place of residence for themselves,” he said last week.

Pashinyan appears inclined to be flexible regarding Nagorno-Karabakh’s future and might eventually agree even to a minority status for its Armenians. Such flexibility would be a big chance for peace. Erdogan could help by shifting to a position that would facilitate things for Pashinyan and prompt Aliyev to be less intransigent.

 


#600 MosJan

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Posted 13 October 2022 - 08:44 AM






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