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USA Founding Fathers Not Christians!


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#1 man

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Posted 11 October 2013 - 10:52 AM

From reading this book we see that the Founding Fathers of America were not Christians, Christians believe that Jesus Christ is the only Savior of this planet earth (after all he created this planet and the mankind on it) and all the rest are false and coming from religious imagination and wisdom of the human kind and not coming from God.

 

A New Book:
"Thomas Jefferson’s Qur’an: Islam and the Founders" By Denise A. Spellberg 416 pages. Knopf.


Ranged against separation was a view of church-state relations teaching that government could accommodate religion and need not be neutral between the cause of religion in general and that of irreligion or atheism. Adherents of this view included Samuel Adams, Roger Sherman, and Patrick Henry. The ongoing struggle between these two points of view has shaped and continues to shape American religious history and the law of church and state under the U.S. Constitution.

Spellberg adds to this familiar story well a valuable and unfamiliar twist, introducing Islam as a focal-point of American thought and argument. Were Muslims to be excluded from America? Was Islam antithetical to American ideas of religious freedom and openness of citizenship?

Spellberg begins her answers to these questions by analyzing Europeans’ and Americans’ negative and positive images of Islam between the mid-sixteenth century and the eighteenth century. For example, the French jurist and philosophe Charles Louis Secondat, baron de Montesquieu, made Muslim diplomats the viewpoint characters of his pathbreaking satirical novel The Persian Letters, which presented European laws, institutions, manners, and morals from an “outsider” Muslim perspective. Yet many Europeans and Americans, seeing Muslims as perennial adversaries of Christianity from the Crusades, insisted that Muslims had no claim to religious liberty because of their supposed hostility to the idea of liberty. Turning from a general overview to focus on Jefferson, Spellberg devotes the core of her book to examining his seemingly antithetical views with regard to Islam and its believers. Though Jefferson was a harsh critic of Islam as a religion (as he was of all Abrahamic religions) and of the hostage-taking and ransom-seeking practices of Muslim states in the Mediterranean (the “Barbary Pirates,” against whom he unsuccessfully tried to organize a Euro-American naval alliance), he also was a staunch advocate of religious freedom even for those falling outside the conventional spectrum of Protestant Christian believers, including Catholics, Jews,and Muslims. Jefferson’s views differed from those of his friend and diplomatic colleague John Adams, who dismissed Jefferson’s quest for an alliance against the Barbary states as unrealistic and who rejected the inclusion of Muslims within an evolving American definition of religious freedom.

Thomas Jefferson’s Quran: How Islam Shaped the Founders
by R.B. Bernstein

http://www.opinion-m...ffersons-quran/
What role did Islam have in shaping the Founders’ views on religion? A new book argues that to understand the debate over church and state, we need to look to their views on Muslims, writes R.B. Bernstein.

One of the nastiest aspects of modern culture wars is the controversy raging over the place of Islam and Muslims in Western society. Too many Americans say things about Islam and Muslims that would horrify and offend them if they heard such things said about Christianity or Judaism, Christians or Jews. Unfortunately, those people won’t open Denise A. Spellberg’s Thomas Jefferson’s Qur’an: Islam and the Founders. This enlightening book might cause them to rethink what they’re saying.

Thomas Jefferson’s Qur’an examines the intersection during the nation’s founding era of two contentious themes in the culture wars—the relationship of Islam to America, and the proper relationship between church and state. The story that it tells ought to be familiar to most Americans, and is familiar to historians of the nation’s founding. And yet, by using Islam as her book’s touchstone, Spellberg brings illuminating freshness to an oft-told tale.

Spellberg, associate professor of history and Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Texas at Austin, seeks to understand the role of Islam in the American struggle to protect religious liberty. She asks how Muslims and their religion fit into eighteenth-century Americans’ models of religious freedom. While conceding that many Americans in that era viewed Islam with suspicion, classifying Muslims as dangerous and unworthy of inclusion within the American experiment, she also shows that such leading figures as Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and George Washington spurned exclusionary arguments, arguing that America should be open to Muslim citizens, office-holders, and even presidents. Spellberg’s point is that, contrary to those today who would dismiss Islam and Muslims as essentially and irretrievably alien to the American experiment and its religious mix, key figures in the era of the nation’s founding argued that that American church-state calculus both could and should make room for Islam and for believing Muslims.

As Spellberg argues with compelling force, the conventional understanding of defining religion’s role in the nation’s public life has at its core a sharp divide between acceptable beliefs (members of most Protestant Christian denominations) and the unacceptable “other.” Many Protestant Americans, for example, disdained the Roman Catholic Church because of their memories of the bitter religious wars of the Protestant Reformation. Further, Pennsylvania’s constitution and laws allowed voting, sitting on juries, and holding office only to those who professed a belief in the divine inspiration of the Old and New Testaments.

By contrast, Thomas Jefferson, a central figure in Spellberg’s book, had a strong, lifelong commitment to religious liberty. Jefferson rejected toleration, the alternative perspective and one embraced by John Locke and John Adams, as grounded on the idea that a religious majority has a right to impose its will on a religious minority, but chooses to be tolerant for reasons of benevolence. Religious liberty, Jefferson argued, denies the majority any right to coerce a dissenting minority, even one hostile to religion. Jefferson rejected using government power to coerce religious belief and practice because it would create a nation of tyrants and hypocrites, as it is impossible to force someone to believe against the promptings of his conscience. Jefferson embraced religious liberty and separation of church and state to protect the individual human mind and the secular political realm from the corrupting alliance of church and state. His political ally James Madison, echoing Roger Williams, the seventeenth-century Baptist religious leader and founder of Rhode Island, added that separation of church and state also would protect the garden of the church from a corrupting alliance with the wilderness of the secular world.

http://www.opinion-m...ffersons-quran/
 



#2 onjig

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Posted 11 October 2013 - 10:45 PM

Me thinks it be a lot of rot.



#3 man

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Posted 17 October 2013 - 09:57 AM

"America never was one nation under God..it was one nation under freemasons.." shouts a female protester from the podium of the House of Congress for all Congressmen to hear..on Oct. 16 Wednesday night after 11:30 PM just after the majority of Congress voted in favor of the deal

 

House stenographer sent for mental exam after floor rant: ‘Praise be to God’
 By Cheryl K. Chumley With Stephen Dinan
October 17, 2013
http://www.washingto.../#ixzz2hzi6kqiy

House stenographer Dianne Reidy stunned congressional members late Wednesday evening at the tail end of the government shutdown vote [a vote in favor of opening & funding by debt the US Gov. apparently she was protesting the Yes vote or endorsing it, who knows?] when she wound her way to the podium, ranting about God, Free Masons and the inability of the nation to serve two masters.

“Praise be to God,” Ms. Reidy said. “He will not be mocked. He will not be mocked. Don’t touch me. He will not be mocked.”

Fox News said Ms. Reidy is well-liked on Capitol Hill — hardly the radical partisan type — and her interruption caused several members to express concern for her mental health. The cable network also reported that Ms. Reidy was sent for a mental evaluation shortly after the incident.

Among her statements, as captured on audio: “The greatest deception here is this is not one nation under God. It never was. Had it been, it would not have been. No. It would not have been. The Constitution would not have been written by Freemasons. They go against God. You cannot serve two masters. You cannot serve two masters. Praise be to God, the Lord Jesus Christ. Praise forever.”

Others on the video tape can be heard in the background urging her to be quiet.

“I think there’s a lot of sympathy, because something clearly happened there,” said Rep. Gerry Connolly, of Ms. Reidy, in The Hill.

And Rep. Joaquin Castro said similarly: “I’ve seen her around when I’ve been on the floor. Other members who have been here longer said she always seemed nice. She was yelling about not being able to serve two masters.”
---
As of Thursday morning this article had more than 240 comments
 



#4 man

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Posted 17 October 2013 - 01:02 PM

"The US Constitution should not have been written by Freemason Founding Fathers, they go against God" shouts a new American-Lady-of-Liberty, Dianne Reidy, from the podium of US Congress, the podium is also the place where the US president speaks from while addressing the congress.

YouTube Film:
Title: The Hidden Faith of The Founding Fathers 2010
 Uploaded on Mar 15, 2011
"The Hidden Faith of the Founding Fathers" by Adullam Films, written & directed by Christian J. Pinto. The full presentation is 3 hours long, and covers the beliefs of George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Paine, and John Adams. The film also gives a Biblical view of what these men believed, and how their philosophies are acknowledged in Bible prophecy. Learn more at www.adullamfilms.com

Here is clean voice audio of Dianna Reidy's act:
https://soundcloud.c...oor1-101612-wav
Notice she end her words by "Praise be to God, Lord Jesus Christ". How amazing because that name "Jesus Christ" is NEVER NEVER allowed to be pronounced in Congress and in the Senate because it was forbidden by masons & freemasons for that name to be uttered in those two buildings.

"He [God] will not be mocked (1), He will not be mocked (2), He will not be mocked (3). The greatest deception here, is that this is not one nation under God. It never was. Had it been... it would not have been... No. it would not have been... the Constitution would not have been written by Free-Masons... and go against God. You cannot serve two masters. You cannot serve two masters. Praise be to God, Lord Jesus Christ." She is saying "go agaist" which refers to masons, if she had said "goes against" she would have referred to the constitution.

Here is the video version from C-SPAN but the voice is not clean because of all the chatting and the banging of the gavel all around, in the audio version above the background noise was eliminated by sound technicians:
http://www.politico....uring-vote.html

CNN's Dana Bash spoke with several staffers who knew the woman well. "She's a well-known person, she's a perfectly nice person, a good colleague, somebody who's respectable and dependable, and this is very surprising to everybody who works with her," Bash reported on air.

A Report By JOSE DELREAL | Oct/17/13

The House stenographer that took over a microphone and began shouting in the House chamber Wednesday night told a Fox News reporter that the Holy Spirit compelled her to do it.

“For the past 2 and 1/2 weeks, the Holy Spirit has been waking me up in the middle of the night and preparing me (through my reluctance and doubt) to deliver a message in the House Chamber,” stenographer Dianne Foster Reidy told Fox News’s Chad Pergram in a written statement. “That is what I did last night.”

As members of the House were voting on the funding bill that would reopen the government and lift the debt ceiling last night, Reidy began shouting into a microphone near the House speaker’s chair, leading to her removal.

“He will not be mocked. He will not be mocked – don’t touch me – he will not be mocked,” she said Wednesday night. “The greatest deception here is this is not one nation under God. It never was…the Constitution would not have been written by the Freemasons. They go against God.”

Link: http://www.politico....l#ixzz2i0NXbAjr
 






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