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Do you trust Russia or the United States more and why?


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#21 onjig

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Posted 17 January 2016 - 01:55 PM

He, krill, is supposed to be a man of God like a Vartabed, a doctor of the Church. He can't, not know what was done and how completely it was done. That every last one was not done away with, can not lead a sane man deny what in fact happen is terrible. Sham on him. He should be lowered in rank and given a parish in Lower Slabovia.



#22 yergatuni1

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Posted 19 January 2016 - 08:40 PM

Trust the US less, Russia more. But neither one really. At least Armenia's and Russia's interests coincide concerning protecting the Armenian-Turkish border. Also, Russians are at odds with Turks, same as us. Lastly, they have recognized the Genocide. That's enough for me. Not perfect, given their duplicitous stance on Artsakh, but its the best we can get right now.

 

The US? they care little for Armenia; they've proved it, time and time again. They've sided with the turks, at least for now.  


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#23 gamavor

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Posted 15 April 2016 - 04:50 PM

This one is for America lovers.
 
http://asbarez.com/1...-armenian-flag/

#24 MosJan

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Posted 16 April 2016 - 02:17 PM

ethics of posting a flag :  if your  going to  hang a  Armenia Flag front of  your  house. you  need to make  sure you place a  US  flag on  Left  of it.
you need to take  dawn  the flags on sundown, unless you have a  light pointing on to it. just my .2


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#25 Yervant1

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Posted 17 April 2016 - 08:44 AM

ethics of posting a flag :  if your  going to  hang a  Armenia Flag front of  your  house. you  need to make  sure you place a  US  flag on  Left  of it.
you need to take  dawn  the flags on sundown, unless you have a  light pointing on to it. just my .2

Agreed! Also let's not forget that not everybody knows who's who and who are they. Nowadays people are on their edge with everything that's happening in the world, people are fed up with political correctness and the sense of entitlement.



#26 gamavor

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Posted 21 April 2016 - 04:44 AM



#27 gamavor

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Posted 21 April 2016 - 05:35 PM

http://asbarez.com/w...4206-2a8835.jpg

 

This picture speaks volumes about the " brave, bold and.......freeee" :)


Edited by gamavor, 21 April 2016 - 05:38 PM.


#28 gamavor

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Posted 27 October 2017 - 06:19 PM

When I'm telling you that for all practical purposes USA is a Turkish whore you don't believe me. Here, read it!

https://www.nytimes....ng-america.html

Seeing Danger in a Face

By ALEX BASTIAN OCT. 27, 2017


San Francisco — Every day, American citizens are detained in windowless rooms at international airports with little to no scrutiny. I am not referring to airports in some foreign country; I am referring to our airports here in the United States. I know, because it happened to me.

Earlier this month, I was returning to San Francisco from a trip to Armenia and Greece. Without a single question, but with careful scrutiny of my face and Middle Eastern features, an agent from the Department of Homeland Security at San Francisco International Airport ordered me to a room in the back of the terminal. As I headed to the detention area, I had many thoughts racing through my head. The biggest one, however, was practical: How does detaining, based on his appearance, a San Francisco prosecutor who has spent most of his professional career advancing public safety, make America safer?

After about an hour of waiting, my interrogator came to ask me some questions. He asked me about my trip to Armenia, whether I had attempted to sneak into Turkey or Syria during my vacation, whether I had visited any refugee camps and whether I had joined any groups like ISIS. These are astoundingly ignorant questions. For one thing, I am an Armenian-American whose family escaped the Lebanese Civil War over 35 years ago. As a descendant of the Armenian Genocide, a genocide perpetrated by Turks, there is absolutely no logical reason I would sneak into Turkey from Armenia (especially since Turkey has blockaded that border). Furthermore, as an Armenian, I am a Christian, and as Armenians in Syria and Iraq have experienced, meeting with jihadist groups would have led to my kidnapping and possible beheading.
It wasn’t until some time into my questioning that the officer asked what I did for a living. I told him I was a prosecutor in the San Francisco district attorney’s office, a fact that could have been revealed with a simple Google search. My detention ended shortly after that information came to light. What never came to light, however, is why they detained me in the first place. They never gave me a straight answer, and I have very few avenues for recourse. My detention was well within the rules.
The ham-handed nature of my interrogation is worth recounting, because it points to the nature of racial profiling, and its widespread use at our borders. Even if I had been a Muslim American, what connection would my appearance or religion have to my potential risk to national security?

To answer that question, one must first try to understand why racial profiling occurs. It is born from misplaced and unjustified fear, among other more morally bankrupt reasons. That fear creates racist policies in our country, and not just at our borders: You can see it in the over-policing of predominantly African-American neighborhoods, the over-incarceration of African-Americans, the calls for mass deportations of Latino immigrants and the internment of Japanese-Americans during World War II. In each case, one’s identity, or skin color, or religion is taken as sufficient evidence of a dangerous intent. Some will try to disavow the racism by saying that these traits are simply a convenient proxy, but it amounts to the same thing. If you detain Muslims at the airport because of a stereotype about Muslims and terror, the problem isn’t them.

I am not saying there should not be extensive security at airports. As someone in law enforcement, I believe wholeheartedly that there should be. But the current policy of detaining people at airports based on the way they look is not only unconstitutional, it also fails to make us safe. Racial profiling fails all of us because we all know danger comes from people who can look like anyone. Profiling also loses the hearts and minds of the citizens the government is supposed to be working for. It begets the question: If my country does not love me, why should I continue to love my country? And if I as a public servant am beginning to have that question creep in my mind, what are others thinking on our streets and in our airports?

I went back and forth about writing this. Perhaps, it would have been in my best interest to let the incident go. However, I’ve been racially profiled at the airport before — and so have my brother, my father and most likely hundreds if not thousands of other American citizens who look just like me. I’ve also been profiled in the streets. These experiences are part of why I became a prosecutor: to find a way to be part of the solution rather than complain about the problem. But these experiences are taxing. I can’t change my face, I can’t change my features, nor should I have to fly overseas in a tuxedo to make airport authorities feel more at ease.

We are a nation of laws, and no policy should be above some level of accountability and scrutiny. And, at the very least, as an American citizen, I should be constitutionally entitled to know why I have been detained. The minute we stop being a nation of laws is when we no longer are the United States of America.


Alex Bastian is the deputy chief of staff at the San Francisco District Attorney’s Office and a native San Franciscan.

Edited by gamavor, 27 October 2017 - 06:39 PM.


#29 Yervant1

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Posted 28 October 2017 - 08:17 AM

Sorry Gams I'll disagree with you, it has nothing to do with US doing a favour for Turkey on this case. Most probably the issue is that the person in question here, is born in Lebanon and if you think that border inspectors knows about our religion and our Genocide is asking too much. 


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#30 gamavor

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Posted 29 October 2017 - 04:42 AM

You may disagree, but I'm very suspicious when it comes to America being well-intended towards Armenia and the Armenians. I have every right to be like this given not only past ugly deeds on the part of the American administration, but also recent twists... have a look in here:
http://hyeforum.com/...2442&hl=bizarre

Any Armenian that is not making good money and still prefers to stay in US to me is a complete idiot.

Edited by gamavor, 29 October 2017 - 04:46 AM.


#31 Yervant1

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Posted 29 October 2017 - 09:02 AM

I think you're confusing US government policy with a single custom agents act. I'm only talking about this border incident, I thought I made that clear when I said in this incident and this incident alone otherwise I'm sympathetic with your assessment. I'm pretty sure this agent didn't even know that this person is Armenian because his passport would say he's born in Lebanon and a US citizen until further questioning. It's no secret to anyone that US is in bed with Turkey due to political and business interests, of course US wants Armenia to align with the west but we all know that Turkey has more weight hence preference.

Let me tell you an incident that happened years ago, when I went to Cyprus from Lebanon. The custom's agent being Greek and familiar with Armenian and Turkish issues, asked me if I was Armenian and that was the end of the questioning. Imagine if he didn't know the history I'm sure the interrogation would have been longer.  

Of course if the person was born in the US than it's pure and simple case of profiling not necessarily against Armenians but against middle easterners as a whole, that every country and every police force does it without saying it openly.


Edited by Yervant1, 29 October 2017 - 09:08 AM.

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#32 Arshak1946

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Posted 30 October 2017 - 09:45 AM

Hello ,

Without involve on this topic religion , I would say not thrust either Russia or USA , we should other options , I go thrusting our very old friend I say IRAN. politically if you show that friendship may be Russia or USA try to be on our side just Russia and USA have very bad relations with IRAN , also we should put our scientist , engineers , builders to use there brain build up military hardware our selves , I have believe that. We have great young generation is coming up , also we should make life standarts high so Armenians stay in Armenian , these younger generation are great asses to our country.

My best regards to all.


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#33 onjig

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Posted 01 November 2017 - 06:55 PM

Yes, the people of Armenia should be treated well, their standard of living should be improved~ can this be done by the government of Armenia~ I'd like to know more about this```



#34 Arshak1946

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Posted 02 November 2017 - 06:11 AM

Hello,

Yes, Armenian people in Armenia should be treated well, their standard of living should be improved , question above is can this be done by the government of Armenia , My personal opinion goverment should not be doing this , private sector should create jobs to increase standard of living. we should use Armenian peoples brain , like scientists , engineers , architects to design , to build military hardware , tools , etc etc instead buying from outside world sending money out of country , that's why everything down in Armenia , people living out of country looking better life , if this trend continuous very soon land of Armenia will be empty. very sad future we should act now.

My best regards.

Good Bye.



#35 Yervant1

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Posted 03 November 2017 - 09:31 AM

A1+
 
 
Iran is ready to provide us gas with cheap prices, but we do not want it – Stepan Grigoryan
e42575eb75d549c3b2a997f555936c05-472x265

Stepan Grigoryan, Chairman of the Board of the Analytical Center for Globalization and Regional Cooperation, believes that the construction of the Baku-Tbilisi-Kars railway will not influence on the necessity of constructing the Armenia-Iran railway. It is important for Armenia. “When there is no political will, it is very dangerous, when there is no desire for independence. We have given the railway monopoly to Russia, and Russia does not need to build the Armenia-Iran railway. They will not go against themselves.”

According to the speaker, Iran once again officially announced that it is ready to provide Armenia with gas at a lower price. In contrast, our government has no response.

 


#36 Arshak1946

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Posted 03 November 2017 - 11:10 AM

I wonder why Stepan Grigoryan, Chairman of the Board of the Analytical Center for Globalization and Regional Cooperation are making this type comment. Also we also our old friend Italia.

Now is global world.

Sincerely Yours.



#37 Yervant1

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Posted 03 November 2017 - 01:50 PM

Because in my opinion Russia prevents Armenia from developing economical ties with Iran. Armenia can get cheaper oil and gas from Iran instead of Russia. 



#38 Yervant1

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Posted 27 December 2017 - 10:55 AM

Mehr News Agency, Iran
Dec 26 2017
 
 
Armenian MP says Soros behind unrest in Armenia
2275720.jpg?ts=1486462047399
News ID: 4183811 -  Tue 26 December 2017 - 21:09
 
                       
TEHRAN, Dec. 26 (MNA) – Iranian state run news network TV broadcast an interview with Hayk Babukhanyan, an Armenian MP, who says George Soros has spent thousands of dollars on destabilizing Armenia.

Hayk Babukhanyan, an Armenian Member of Parliament, told Iranian state run news network TV that Foundations run by George Soros, a Hungarian-American fund providers to dissidents in former Soviet states, have contributed 20,000 dollars to recent unrest in Armenia.

The Armenian legislator adds that the total money spent by Soros in Armenia just in the last year has been around $1,750,000.

YNG/IRNN 551668

https://en.mehrnews....rest-in-Armenia



#39 Yervant1

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Posted 21 January 2018 - 09:02 AM

Panorama, Armenia
Jan 20 2018
 
 
Russia risking its ties with Armenia amid new military supplies to Azerbaijan - Styopa Safaryan

Russia’s attitude to Armenia is just unacceptable as it continues supplying weapons to Azerbaijan in what is seen to further damage the bilateral relations. Kremlin should acknowledge the criticism over its policy will grow in Armenia over the time, Styopa Safaryan, founder of the Armenian Institute of International and Security Affairs (AIISA) told Panorama.am in an interview, commenting on a new batch of Russian military equipment delivered to Azerbaijan. 

“It was especially right after the April war, when not only relations between Russia and Armenia were strained but the Russian military-technical cooperation with Azerbaijan was put on hold. It was no coincidence, Russian Deputy PM Dmitry Rogozin visited Baku weeks ago. The resumption of the military supplies was undoubtedly in the agenda of bilateral talks. I consider this extremely dangerous,” Safaryan said.

“Russia seems seeking a goal to lose all possible friends, at least it has chosen the route to that end. Armenia is one of the few countries that has always maintained solidarity with Russia in the foreign affairs - often to the detriment of own interest,” Safaryan added. 

The political analyst recalled Armenia’s acknowledgment of Crimea as part of Russia, that endangered relations with Ukraine, saying: “We made that decision considering Russia’s role in our foreign policy and allied relations. In contrast, Russia’s actions appear unthankful.”

https://www.panorama...afaryan/1893357






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