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40 Days of Musa Ler


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#1 robertik1

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Posted 30 May 2008 - 09:32 PM

Does anyone know if Sylvester Stallone is going to make the remake of the movie? huh.gif

#2 Arpa

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Posted 31 May 2008 - 09:36 AM

Dear Robertik, we love you!
Can you please amend the title of your thread to Musa Ler?
As we speak there is no such thing as Musa D**h. Even those SSOs** call it Saman D**h.
To us it has been and will always be Musa(neri) Ler.
Even though many of us may know that goddam language, we prefer to not use it.
Franz Werfel was not Armenian, he did not know the difference of the furkish d**h and the Armeian LER. What is our Excuse??? mad.gif
We still remember when you came here with a furkish nickname, thank you for amending it.
And, please, please, if and when that Italian Stallion decides to follow suit, urge him to use MUSA LER as his title.
Thank you!!!
** SSO stands for "sun-shan-ordi"

Edited by Arpa, 31 May 2008 - 09:55 AM.


#3 robertik1

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Posted 31 May 2008 - 09:56 AM

QUOTE (Arpa @ May 31 2008, 09:36 AM)
Dear Robertik, we love you!
Can you please amend the title of your thread to Musa Ler?
As we speak there is no such thing as Musa D**h. Even those SSOs call it Saman D**h.
To us it has been and will always be Musa(neri) Ler.
Even though many of us may know that goddam language, we prefer to not use it.
Franz Werfel was not Armenian, he did not know the difference of the furkish d**h and the Armeian LER. What is our Excuse??? mad.gif
We still remember when you came here with a furkish nickname, thank you for amending it.
And, please, please, if and when that Italian Stallion decides to follow suit, urge him to use MUSA LER as his title.
Thank you!!!



That was the name of the original movie. But Ill change it the same..... biggrin.gif

btw, how would you edit? I could this edit this now, but that first post was posted some time ago.

Edited by robertik1, 31 May 2008 - 10:00 AM.


#4 Arpa

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Posted 31 May 2008 - 10:05 AM

QUOTE (robertik1 @ May 31 2008, 03:56 PM)
That was the name of the original movie. But Ill change it the same..... biggrin.gif

btw, how would you edit? I could this edit this now, but that first post was posted some time ago.

Yes, we know. Did Franz speak Armenian?
Those SSOs call Masis "aghri". Shall we amend our language here too?


#5 robertik1

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Posted 31 May 2008 - 10:08 AM

QUOTE (Arpa @ May 31 2008, 11:05 AM)
Yes, we know. Did Franz speak Armenian?
Those SSOs call Masis "aghri". Shall we amend our language here too?


Ok, how do you do it?

#6 Arpa

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Posted 31 May 2008 - 11:15 AM

There is till time.
Bring up your post. Go to edit, and... good luck. Otherwise let our mods do it.
And please, please forget that goddam language. Learn to speak Armenian.
We speak Armenian here! Mountain is LER not (MUSA) qaq-d**h!
We don't allow to describe that murdere talaat qaqa as p*s*a, and Artsakh as kara***qaqa here, why should we allow (Musa) qaq-d*g*?
Do we know Armenian? Do we know that the Armenian word for mountain is LER/SAR?
When did Franz Werfel, the Austrian-German Jew, as sincere a he may have been become an Armenian linguist?
Can we teach him how to speak Armenian?
Hopefully, some day our mods and ads see it fit that that goddam D*** word never displays again, perhaps replace it it with LER??!! Just as they have placed filters to never display talat qaqa or kara-qaq= Artsakh.
Please eveyone! Don't use that cursed D word. We have more words than that drunken idiot Noah** to deascribe mountain, words like LER and SAR.
** Does any one know that the Bible never said Mountain (singular) of Ararat, but the plural thereof as MounainS of Ararat, i.e the Land of the Araratians?
If only we, and those illitero-biblio-fundamentaist idiots would learn how to read!!

Edited by Arpa, 31 May 2008 - 12:21 PM.


#7 robertik1

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Posted 31 May 2008 - 01:17 PM

QUOTE (Arpa @ May 31 2008, 11:15 AM)
There is till time.
Bring up your post. Go to edit, and... good luck. Otherwise let our mods do it.
And please, please forget that goddam language. Learn to speak Armenian.
We speak Armenian here! Mountain is LER not (MUSA) qaq-d**h!
We don't allow to describe that murdere talaat qaqa as p*s*a, and Artsakh as kara***qaqa here, why should we allow (Musa) qaq-d*g*?
Do we know Armenian? Do we know that the Armenian word for mountain is LER/SAR?
When did Franz Werfel, the Austrian-German Jew, as sincere a he may have been become an Armenian linguist?
Can we teach him how to speak Armenian?
Hopefully, some day our mods and ads see it fit that that goddam D*** word never displays again, perhaps replace it it with LER??!! Just as they have placed filters to never display talat qaqa or kara-qaq= Artsakh.
Please eveyone! Don't use that cursed D word. We have more words than that drunken idiot Noah** to deascribe mountain, words like LER and SAR.
** Does any one know that the Bible never said Mountain (singular) of Ararat, but the plural thereof as MounainS of Ararat, i.e the Land of the Araratians?
If only we, and those illitero-biblio-fundamentaist idiots would learn how to read!!


Its ok, did mods did it. smile.gif


#8 MosJan

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Posted 31 May 2008 - 01:45 PM

QUOTE (Arpa @ May 31 2008, 10:15 AM)
There is till time.
Bring up your post. Go to edit, and... good luck. Otherwise let our mods do it.
And please, please forget that goddam language. Learn to speak Armenian.
We speak Armenian here! Mountain is LER not (MUSA) qaq-d**h!
We don't allow to describe that murdere talaat qaqa as p*s*a, and Artsakh as kara***qaqa here, why should we allow (Musa) qaq-d*g*?
Do we know Armenian? Do we know that the Armenian word for mountain is LER/SAR?
When did Franz Werfel, the Austrian-German Jew, as sincere a he may have been become an Armenian linguist?
Can we teach him how to speak Armenian?
Hopefully, some day our mods and ads see it fit that that goddam D*** word never displays again, perhaps replace it it with LER??!! Just as they have placed filters to never display talat qaqa or kara-qaq= Artsakh.
Please eveyone! Don't use that cursed D word. We have more words than that drunken idiot Noah** to deascribe mountain, words like LER and SAR.
** Does any one know that the Bible never said Mountain (singular) of Ararat, but the plural thereof as MounainS of Ararat, i.e the Land of the Araratians?
If only we, and those illitero-biblio-fundamentaist idiots would learn how to read!!



Arpa papik teteven vertsur

hima tansyon@d noren ver bid yella

#9 robertik1

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Posted 31 May 2008 - 02:07 PM

Ok getting back the original topic, is Stallone going to make the remake or not?

#10 Zartonk

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Posted 01 June 2008 - 02:53 PM

I hope so. We should petition.

#11 hyethga

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Posted 06 June 2008 - 02:59 PM

QUOTE (robertik1 @ May 31 2008, 02:07 PM)
Ok getting back the original topic, is Stallone going to make the remake or not?


I'm curious, how did Stallone's interest pique in the Armenian Genocide. I know that for years, we've been lobbying for the biggest genocide director (Stevie) but he's never commented about it. In fact, I think he just made a new film or is in the middle of making one about Ukrainian Jews in occupied USSR.

#12 Yervant1

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Posted 19 March 2013 - 09:12 AM

REDISCOVERING FRANZ WERFEL: POTSDAM CONFERENCE ANALYZES LIFE OF BRAVE HUMANITARIAN

http://www.mirrorspe...e-humanitarian/
ARMENIAN GENOCIDE, ARTS | MARCH 18, 2013 4:54 PM

Franz Werfel
By Muriel Mirak-Weissbach

Special to the Mirror-Spectator

POTSDAM, Germany - Among the required reading for most Armenians
is the novel The Forty Days of Musa Dagh by Franz Werfel, and the
author is thus known among Armenians mainly - if not exclusively -
for this monumental work. But, as a conference held on March 10-12
in Potsdam, Germany documented, Werfel's literary accomplishments
include a large number of other significant works which deal
with a vast array of issues. The title of the three-day conference
cosponsored by the Lepsius House and the Moses Mendelssohn Center in
Potsdam already gives a sense of the scope of his activity which has
been the subject of extensive research: "Genocide and Literature:
Franz Werfel in an Armenian-Jewish-Turkish-German Perspective. In
the course of the speeches and concluding round table discussion,
speakers from Germany, France, Austria and the United States shed
new light on the many facets of this extraordinarily complex figure.

Peter Stephan Jungk, who has written a Werfel biography, introduced
the author with an overview of his life and works, and remarked that
doing research for the book took him on a journey through the first
half of the 20th century. In fact, Werfel had experienced World War
I first-hand and suffered persecution under the Nazi regime prior to
World War II. Although he was born in 1890 in Prague to Jewish parents,
as a youth Franz did not receive formal religious instruction and
became in fact enamored of Christian culture. This was due to a close
relationship he had with governess Barbara Simunkova, a Catholic who
took him to mass and taught him prayers. His early exposure to both
religious cultures was the source of a theme that was to become a
leitmotif in his thoughts and works. At 12, a passionate opera goer
and Verdi fan (he wrote Verdi. Novel of the Opera, 1924), Franz started
composing poetry at 16 and his first volume of verse published in 1911,
Der Weltfreund (Friend of the World), was a bestseller. Other works
in drama and fiction followed, many crowned with success. Musa Dagh,
which appeared in 1933, was acclaimed and rightly seen as a foreboding
to Jews in Germany. When, in May 1933, his book was publicly burned
along with others by the Nazis, Werfel's persecution began. He had
to flee Vienna after the 1938 Nazi invasion, and, after the Nazis
entered Paris, he fled Zurich via France for the US, where he settled
in California.

Who was Franz Werfel really? As Prof. Hans Dieter Zimmermann of Berlin
put it, there were three souls in the author - a German, a Czech and
a Jewish soul. A member of the celebrated Prague circle along with
Max Brod, Franz Kafka and others, Werfel was a German-speaking Jew
like the majority of his intellectual companions, but they were a
tiny minority in Czechoslovakia. Politically they stood apart from
the other German-speakers, the Sudetendland Germans in Bohemia, who
were pro-Nazis. Forced by political developments to move from place
to place, Werfel often asked himself where his "homeland" really was.

Werfel also had a Christian soul, to be precise, as Viennese scholar
Dr. Olga Koller put it, a Catholic soul. In his works, he "lived
between two religions" and "felt at home in both." Thus, Paul Among the
Jews: A Tragedy (1926) and his novel, Jeremiah: Listen to the Voice
(1937), which dealt with Jewish figures, came from the same pen that
wrote Barbara oder die Frommigkeit (Barbara, or Piety, 1929), Der
veruntreute Himmel (Embezzled Heaven, 1939) which relates the tale of
a woman seeking assurances of entering heaven, as well as The Song of
Bernadette (1941), featuring the young girl and her vision at Lourdes.

If Martin Buber reacted to his Christian writings with accusations of
"betrayal," his wife, Alma Mahler, pressured him to renounce Judaism.

His commitment to the Armenian cause was unequivocal. It was during
his second trip through the Middle East in 1930, which took him and
his wife through Egypt, Palestine, Syria and Lebanon, that he came
face to face with the issue. In Damascus he saw groups of abandoned,
dirty, hungry children, whose huge dark eyes haunted him. When he
asked who they were, he learned that they were the survivors of the
Armenians massacred by the Turks, and that no one was caring for them.

As Prof. Andreas Meier from Wuppertal recalled, Werfel could not
get their images out of his mind and the idea for the book "became
virulent."

The Werfels were not the only author couple travelling in the region
at that time, Meier said. There was also Armin Wegner and his wife,
and he too set out to write about the Armenian Genocide. The story of
how the two men approached the subject and how a literary controversy
ensued was treated by several speakers in Potsdam.

Dr. Rolf Hosfeld, director of the Lepsius House, focused on the
historical facts behind Werfel's novel, identifying the real-life
figures who inspired the leading protagonists in the novel: priest
Dikran Andreasian (Aram Tomasian) and Moses Der-Kaloustian (Gabriel
Bagradian), the former military officer who led the resistance.

In his summary of the account, Hosfeld distinguished fact from fiction:
in addition to the two historical personalities, the story of the
flight up the mountain was true, as were the descriptions of the three
Turkish attacks, the signs calling for help, the altar the resisters
built, and the fire which alerted the French ship Guichon and led to
their rescue. The dramatic encounter between the German humanitarian
Dr. Johannes Lepsius and Young Turk War Minister Enver Pasha also
corresponds to reality, as recorded by Lepsius himself in his report.

The rest, as Prof. Martin Tamke from Gottingen detailed, was fiction.

Herein lies the main difference between the approaches taken by
Wegner and Werfel. When Wegner read in a newspaper in 1933 that
Werfel was touring to present his new book, he was shocked and
accused the author of having taken his material. Wegner, who had
witnessed the Genocide as a medic in the German army, had documented
the atrocities in photographs, and later also interviewed survivors,
visiting them in camps, could not believe that Werfel could have
written such a book without having had this first-hand knowledge. In
their correspondence on the controversy, Werfel expressed his respect
for Wegner's eyewitness experience, but could not acknowledge him as
a source. He also specified that he had isolated a single episode for
his novel, whereas Wegner, in his diary, had been compiling material
for a historical account. For Werfel, Tamke said, the aim was not to
write an eyewitness report but poetry, a work of art.

In addition to researching the saga of the resistance, Werfel also
drew on his extensive knowledge about the Armenian church, or, better,
churches. As Prof. Hacik Gazer from Erlangen explained, Werfel was
familiar with the Armenian churches and cloisters in Venice and Vienna,
and the documents in the Mkhitarist archives there which provided
him with valuable source material.

Through his contact with art historian Josef Strzygowsky, he learned
about Armenian church architecture. Significantly, his references in
the novel are not limited to the Armenian Apostolic Church, but include
several figures from the Protestant churches and missionaries, thus
expressing an "ecumenical" approach. Gazer also noted that Lepsius,
before his encounter with Enver, had met with the Patriarch Zaven,
and that the fictional figure, Juliette (Bagradian's wife) converts
from Catholicism to the Apostolic Church.

The Forty Days of Musa Dagh made history, not only as a work of art,
but as a political message. Prof. Rubina Peroomian, an expert on
Genocide literature from Los Angeles, cited several ways it has been
honored. There is the new English translation by David R. Godine which
represents a complete and accurate rendition of the German original.

Werfel, "a virtual Armenian saint" and a "national hero," was
honored with his wife in New York City in 1935 by the Armenian
community. A plaque in Toulon plays tribute to the sailors who
rescued the Armenians and carries Werfel's name. The survivors of
Musa Dagh and their descendants, though scattered through the world,
have an association and members meet every year in September to
celebrate their victory. Peroomian also reported on how an Armenian
translation had been smuggled into Soviet Armenia in 1935, and later
in the 1960s inspired dissidents and a nationalist revival. In 1988,
as the political climate changed, it was republished. Now there
is a memorial plaque dedicated to Werfel at the Armenian Genocide
monument in Tsitsernakaberd alongside those commemorating Lepsius,
Wegner and others.

But if the novel has brought Werfel recognition and praise, it has
also been slandered, suppressed and officially banned. Dr. Werner
Tress of Potsdam reported that, although Werfel's earlier works had
made him famous by 1933, after the Nazis took power he was persecuted,
expelled from a writers' association, and his novel publicly burned.

With the aid of projections of actual documents from the Nazi
era, Tress showed how one after the other, political and literary
organizations issued black lists of publications considered "damaging"
and "undesirable," and therefore banned. Werfel's name features
prominently in all the documents, sometimes with several works listed
by title, other times, with "complete works." On one black list put out
by the Bavarian Political Police, among the 15 books by Werfel, there
is a "+" mark added to Musa Dagh. This sign meant that if that book
were found in the possession of private persons, in house searches,
it would be confiscated and the owners put under pressure.

Publishers and distributors were ordered not to deliver the book
and customs officials stopped any copies coming across the border
into Germany.

Even long after the defeat of Nazi Germany and in faraway America,
Werfel's monumental work has continued to spark hefty political
controversy. Most clamorous was the fight around a film version of
The Forty Days of Musa Dagh. Planned by MGM in Hollywood in 1935,
the original production never made it into movie theatres, due to
insistent, heavy-handed intimidation by Turkish authorities. As Dr.

Raffi Kantian from Hannover related, the Turkish government made
known through diplomatic channels that it wanted to stop the project,
which, if completed, would "harm" Armenians in Turkey. Other pressure
consisted of threats to ban all MGM films in Turkey, Yugoslavia,
Bulgaria and Greece, while rumors circulated that it was a
"Jewish-Armenian plot," etc.

The political impact of Werfel's work is still felt today, in the
form of the continuing strife around Turkish recognition of the
past. In a concluding roundtable discussion addressing the issue in
the context of European integration, Markus Merkel, a Social Democrat
who introduced a resolution on the Armenian Genocide into the German
Bundestag in 2005, called for an official exhibit to be organized in
Berlin in 2015. He expressed his hope that the Armenian Diaspora would
wield its influence to promote democratization in Armenia as well as
in Turkey, lending support to the expanding debate in Turkish civil
society around the Genocide.

#13 Yervant1

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Posted 29 November 2013 - 09:39 AM

80TH ANNIVERSARY OF FARNZ WERFEL'S "THE FORTY DAYS OF MUSA DAGH" FIRST PUBLISHING CELEBRATED IN VIENNA

17:23 28.11.2013

On the occasion of 80th anniversary of the first publishing of the
famous novel by the Austrian writer Franz Werfel "The Forty Days of
Musa Dagh", a cultural ceremony was organized in Vienna, by the joint
efforts of the Armenian embassy in Austria, the Armenian Genocide
Museum Institute, and the community of the Armenian Apostolic Church
in Austria, the Austrian radio, the Austrian Literature Society and
"Franz Werfel" committee also participated in the organization.

The event was attended by representatives of the Armenian community
in Austria, and Austrian intellectuals.Ambassador Extraordinary and
Plenipotentiary of Armenia in Austria Mr. Arman Kirakosyan made a
welcome speech.

During the event director of the AGMI, Dr. Hayk Demoyan presented the
photographs of the exhibits from Armenian Genocide Museum collection,
related to the heroic Resistance of Musa Dagh.

The event was followed by a concert. Specially for the occasion the
original manuscript of Franz Werfel's famous novel "The Forty days
of Musa Dagh", was brought from the Austrian National Library, and
was presented to the audience.

http://www.armradio....ated-in-vienna/



#14 Yervant1

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Posted 11 September 2014 - 09:52 AM

AUTHOR OF "THE FORTY DAYS OF MUSA DAGH" WOULD TURN 124 TODAY: HAARETZ

17:06, 10 September, 2014

YEREVAN, SEPTEMBER 10, ARMENPRESS: September 10, 1890 is the birthdate
of Franz Werfel, the Prague-born Jewish poet, dramatist and novelist,
whose most acclaimed work, the 1933 "The Forty Days of Musa Dagh,"
about the Armenian genocide, was widely read as a warning about the
Nazi rise to power and the murderous threat it posed to the Jews. As
Armenpress reports, the Israeli "Haaretz" has issued a special article
entitled "This Day in Jewish History", which is devoted to the author's
life and activity.

Werfel was introduced to the Armenian saga by a chance meeting in
Damascus, and the result was a best-selling novel about the Turks'
1915 campaign against the Armenians.

He described the book to audiences as telling how "one of the oldest
and most venerable peoples of the world has been destroyed, murdered,
almost exterminated ... ." Not surprisingly, "The Forty Days" was
one of the first books consigned to the bonfires by the Nazis.

Franz Werfel died on August 26, 1945, at the age of 54.

http://armenpress.am...ay-haaretz.html



#15 Yervant1

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Posted 08 February 2015 - 09:34 AM

102-year-old Armenian Genocide survivor hurries home after surgery

07/02/2015 13:47:00
Oratert News

The witness of the Mount Musa Battle and the traditional Harissa
creation, Silvard Atajyan is waiting for her 103rd anniversary in
April impatiently. The Armenian Genocide witness, notwithstanding the
respectable age, has overcome a serious surgery, which was successful.
At first sight it is unbelievable though fact that even at this age
the woman managed to overcome such a serious health problem and get
well with the help of the doctors. At the hospital ward she does not
feel lack of visitors. Surrounded with the love and care of the
members of her family, Silvard Atajyan is waiting for the soonest
recovery and for the return home.

"Grandma is really strong. Five years ago she got an injury in the
left leg, in which a metal structure was placed and the whole weight
of the body fell on her right leg, which in fact did not endure and
was broken years later", - told the grandson of the Genocide survivor,
Arshavir Atajyan to Armenpress correspondent.

Earlier Armenpress presented the story of the Armenian Genocide
witness, which is as follows:

The Armenian Genocide initiated in the Ottoman Empire during the World
War I in the beginning of the previous century is one of the biggest
crimes against humanity. Advancing the 100th anniversary of the
Armenian Genocide the new project introduced by Armenpress news agency
is dedicated to the story of the eyewitnesses and survivors of the
calamity to prove the world one more time that our demand for the
recognition of the Armenian Genocide is fair and justified. This time
the project is dedicated to the story of 101-year old Silvard Atajyan.

MAY 14, 101-year old Silvard Atajyan living in Armenia is one of the
few witnesses of the events described in renowned novel "The Forty
Days of Musa Dagh" by Austrian author Franz Werfel.

Her family, which comes from Suedia region of Cilicia, was among those
Armenians, which participated in the heroic struggle against the
Turkish slaughterers in 1915. When the local authorities tried to
realize the order to force the Armenians to leave their homes, the
Armenians had made decision to resist and they climbed up the Mount
Musa, where they organized struggle for their self-defense and managed
to throw back the attacks of the Turkish troops 53 days.

Among other things Silvard Atajyan noted: "I climbed up the Mount Musa
along with my sister, mother, and grandmother in 1911. I was three
years old at that time. My father and uncle were soldiers. My father
ordered the mother to take us and climb up the mountain."

After the 53 days of resistance the family reached Egypt due to a French vessel.

Silvard remembers how a part of the women was at the side of their
husbands and the other part supplied food and arms to the fighters.

"In the evening women usually brought figs, grapes and bread for the
fighters. But little by little our forces expired...", - the 101-yer-old
woman said with excitement and tears in her eyes. In the memory of
Silvard, notwithstanding her little age, come out the images of the
French ships, bringing assistance to the Armenians. After the 53 days
of resistance the family reached Egypt due to a French vessel.

Harissa has got a historic past for Musa Dagh people

"During the fights my uncle died, who was thrown into the river. That
was the reason my aunts did not eat fish for years after that", - says
the witness.

After living for five years in Egypt, in 1919 the family of Silvard
returned to the motherland. Then in 1939 they moved to Aleppo and
later, in 1947 - to Yerevan.

"We grew up in Aleppo, where I got married with Hovsep, born in 1911,
who was a colonel. We got a house and came back to Yerevan, from where
we were exiled to Vardenis", - remembers Silvard, who worked there as
a carpet weaver.

In 1953 the Atajyan family moved from Vardenis to Yerevan and got a
land in the Malatia-Sebastia administrative district, where they have
lived up to now.

The hero of our story states that Harissa is one of the traditional
Musa Dagh dishes and has a historic past. It is mainly prepared for
happy or sad ceremonies. And that is the reason it is made after it is
blessed by a priest and necessarily from sacrificed lamb meat.

Years after touching upon the recognition of the Armenian Genocide,
the 101-year-old Silvard says that she does not lose hope, as living
with hope is characteristic of an Armenian. "I often watch news
programs and tell everybody to watch it too, so that they know what is
happening in the world. I am not educated but my brain works", -
states the hero of the story half-seriously and half-jokingly, adding
that according to the forecast, she will live for 5 years more.

She is fond of the flowers, which she has planted and cares with her own hands.

"When I got ill, in the hospital I even told my son not to dry my
flowers", - emphasized the Genocide-atrocities-survived Silvard, who,
using her walking device, showed us all her flowers in the house yard,
the care of which she does not trust anybody.

Today Silvard has 3 sons, one daughter, 7 grandchildren, and 12 great grandsons.

http://www.oratert.c...pora/80280.html
 



#16 Yervant1

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Posted 13 September 2015 - 09:00 AM

A Brief History Of Musa Dagh Armenians

13 hours ago 11/09/15
BY VAHRAM L. SHEMMASSIAN, Ph.D


This essay is a brief account of the history of Musa Dagh Armenians
from mid-nineteenth century to the present. Musa Dagh was situated by
the Mediterranean Sea, in the Svedia sub-district within the Antioch
district of the Ottoman Province of Aleppo. Presently, it is located
in the Samandagh district in the Hatay province of Turkey. Armenians
are believed to have lived in Musa Dagh since antiquity. To date,
their origins remain shrouded in uncertainty. They spoke a dialect
called Kistinik, meaning, the language of Christians. In nineteenth
century, six main Armenian villages existed: Bitias, Haji Habibli,
Yoghunoluk, Kheder Beg, Vakef, and Kabusiye, with a total of about
6,000 inhabitants. The original villages from which the others emerged
were Haji Habibli, Yoghunoluk, and Kabusiye.

The nineteenth and early twentieth century proved a period of change
that transformed the Musa Daghtsis from an isolated, obscure, and
ignorant lot to a conscious collectivity fighting for its very
existence as part of the larger Ottoman Armenian community facing
total annihilation by its own, Young Turk government. Several factors
effected this transformation. A retired British diplomat by the name
of John Barker, who had a summer residence at Bitias and other
property in Kheder Beg, experimented with new vegetables and fruits
acquired from around the world, improved the silkworm seeds for
sericulture, the main occupation in the area, and introduced medicines
to fight epidemic diseases. Equally important, foreign travelers
visiting him exposed Musa Dagh to the outside world for the first time
through their published accounts. American Protestant missionaries
likewise made inroads in Musa Dagh beginning in 1840, leading to the
establishment of Protestant churches in Bitias in 1857 and in
Yoghunoluk in 1869-70. The direct or indirect teachings of the
American ideals of equality and freedom must have impacted the
people's thinking to some extent. Then came Capuchin missionaries from
Europe and established the St. Paul congregation in Kheder Beg in
1891. Their presence, too, must have influenced the locals in terms of
European notions of human rights.

Armenian clergymen, educators, and revolutionaries likewise stopped by
Musa Dagh beginning mid-nineteenth century. When the Armenian National
Constitution was promulgated in the Ottoman Empire in 1863, the
Prelacy in Aleppo dispatched clergymen to its parishes in northwestern
Syria to introduce reforms. As a result, the majority Apostolic
community of Musa Dagh underwent some positive changes, albeit with
difficulty. Similarly, as a consequence of the ongoing Armenian
social, cultural, and political Renaissance across the empire,
`national' primary schools were established in Musa Dagh, whereby
youngsters began to learn about Armenian civilization with its
accomplishments.

Revolutionary societies penetrated Musa Dagh beginning in the 1890s.
Outside activists belonging to the Social Democrat Hnchakian Party
(SDHP) established there what they termed `absolute monarchy' from
1893-96. Many Musa Daghtsis, including large numbers of women, adhered
to the SDHP, were indoctrinated, and underwent some military training.
A degree of `racial `awareness' was thus attained. The Armenian
Revolutionary Federation (ARF) became interested in Musa Dagh during
the Zeytun uprising of 1895-96. Agents were sent to Musa Dagh in the
early 1890s to introduce the party's ideology and platform. An actual
ARF sub-committee was formed in 1908. The Reformed Hnchakian Party had
a cell in Haji Habibli beginning in 1911, and a few followers in some
of the other villages. All three parties smuggled arms into Musa Dagh
for self-defense, although their respective quantities cannot be
verified. The need for self-defense became more acute during the 1909
Armenian massacres in Cilicia and northwestern Syria. Musa Dagh was
spared the carnage thanks to the self-defensive measures it adopted as
well as the presence of a British warship that prevented the Muslim
ruffians from assailing Musa Dagh.

In late July 1915, when Musa Dagh received a deportation order,
two-third of the population chose resistance, whereas one-third
complied with the command and was deported to the Syrian city of Hama
and environs. More than half perished as a result of exposure,
malnutrition, and diseases. The defiant majority fought the Ottoman
Army and Muslim irregulars for more than forty days, and was rescued
by French warships monitoring the coastline and taken to Egypt, where
they would stay for four years in a refugee camp on the eastern banks
of the Suez Canal across from Port Said. The international press
covered this heroic saga with editorials, articles, and pictures.
Material assistance poured into the camp from around the world. In
1933, Franz Werfel, a Jew then living in Vienna, Austria, published a
historical novel, titled The Forty Days of Musa Dagh. It was
translated from its original German into numerous languages in
subsequent years. Musa Dagh became a household name globally, and the
saga itself was immortalized. It also inspired artists and
intellectuals alike to create works that heartened especially
oppressed people with messages of hope for survival. Unfortunately, a
film project by the movie giant Metro-Goldwin-Mayer (MGM) was shelved
due to pressure exerted by the Turkish Embassy in Washington, D.C.,
and the US State Department. Fortunately, another film is currently in
the pipeline.

At Port Said, the refugees lived in tents, and were fed through
bakeries, a kitchen, and a soup kitchen. Children attended the Sisvan
(old name of Cilicia) school run by the Armenian General Benevolent
Union (AGBU). The infirm were tended to in a clinic-hospital supported
by the Armenian Red Cross. Men and women alike worked in various
industrial departments operated by the American Red Cross and the
British Friends of Armenia Society. Some 500-600 youths in 1916 formed
the backbone of the French Légion d'Orient, later renamed the Légion
Arménienne. This force, augmented by Armenian volunteers from the
United States, Europe, and elsewhere, fought victoriously against the
Ottoman Army at the Battle of Arara in Palestine on September 19,
1918, thereby facilitating the Allied occupation of the rest of
Greater Syria as well as Cilicia.

In 1919, the refugees at Port Said and survivors at Hama repatriated
to Musa Dagh. The following two decades witnessed reconstruction and
the resumption of old professions such as comb, spoon, and charcoal
making, sericulture, and farming. A new textile industry inspired hope
for a better future. Bitias, in particular, became a popular tourism
and vacationing center. The three denominations reopened their
churches and schools. Voluntary associations sought to ameliorate
religious, educational, social, and cultural life. The SDHP and the
ARF vied for political dominance through local councils and regional
legislatures, with the latter party succeeding to a larger extent.
Unfortunately, all this would come to an abrupt end in the summer of
1939, when France ceded the Sanjak of Iskenderun/Alexandretta, an
autonomous province in northwestern Syria encompassing Musa Dagh and
other Armenian communities, to Turkey. The overwhelming majority of
Armenians chose to leave the area for other parts of Syria, and
Lebanon, fearful of Turkish rule so tarnished with brutality in recent
memory. Only 6 percent of Musa Daghtsis elected to stay behind. They
are now concentrated in the village of Vakef/Vakifli, which has been
showcased in recent years as the only Armenian village left in Turkey.

The majority that departed Musa Dagh encamped temporarily at Ras
al-Basit, along the Mediterranean between the Armenian enclave of
Kessab and Latakia. They were relocated to a place called Anjar in
Lebanon's Bekaa Valley. Not only did the French High Commission of
Syria and Lebanon purchase the land, but it also constructed the
houses. With much difficulty, hard work, and perseverance, Anjar in
due course became a vibrant rural community. Last year it marked its
seventy-fifth anniversary. In 1946-47, more than half of Anjar's
population resettled in Soviet Armenia.

Wherever they may be, the Musa Daghtsis commemorate their heroic feat
of 1915 annually. Monuments have also been erected. The Damlajik
monument on Musa Dagh itself was inaugurated on September 18, 1932
with pomp and circumstance. The remains of the eighteen fighters who
lost their lives during the resistance were interred in a fenced
cemetery nearby. In Armenia, a majestic monument and an adjacent
museum stand on a hilltop in the town of Musa Ler (Musa Dagh), between
the capital of Yerevan and the Holy See of Echmiadzin. In Anjar, a
memorial complex is situated between the Harach College (high school)
and the St. Paul Apostolic Church. In Cambridge, near Ontario, Canada,
an edifice likewise attracts celebrants each September.

On this centennial of the Musa Dagh resistance to the Armenian
Genocide, challenges remain. How to preserve Musa Daghtsi identity?
How to preserve the dialect? How to impart the history? How to raise
future generations conscious of their roots? And so on. Leadership,
vision, imagination, ingenuity, technology, and other innovative
approaches are key to meeting those challenges. Relegation to oblivion
is not an option.


http://asbarez.com/1...dagh-armenians/
 



#17 Yervant1

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Posted 29 December 2015 - 09:42 AM

VICE-ADMIRAL DARTIGE DU FOURNET - SAVIOUR OF MUSA DAGH ARMENIANS

December 28, 2015

Soldiers are trained to do one thing above all else: follow orders.

Soldiers who disobey face the repercussions of insubordination. Louis
Dartige Du Fournet, a vice admiral of the French Eastern Squadron that
was blockading Ottoman shores near Syria in 1915, was aware of what
the consequences could be should he take matters into his own hands.

Nonetheless, he ordered the rescue of over 4,000 Armenian men, women
and children from certain death in the foothills of Musa Dagh (Mount
Moses, also known as Jebel Musa) in what is present-day southeastern
Turkey.

Dartige had no idea how his commanding officers would respond to his
orders, but he did not wait to find out. He was acutely aware of the
bureaucratic nightmare of intervening in such a conflict, but he was
too short on time.

The story began in the summer of 1915, when the council of six
Armenian-populated villages - Haji Habibli, Kebusiyeh, Vakif, Kheder
Bek, Yoghunoluk and Bitias - located in the Suede district, defied
Ottoman orders to join deportation marches out of the country. On July
30 some of the Armenian inhabitants obeyed the Ottoman instructions
and were eventually killed during death marches to Syrian deserts.

Others - a group of over 5,000 Armenians - left their homes and took
refuge in the foothills of Musa Dagh, on the northern tip of the Bay
of Antioch. There they mounted a valiant military resistance agaist
the Ottoman forces.

There were only 600 fighters among the 5,000 Armenians and they had
few weapons. But they were determined and well disciplined.

They built temporary fortifications around the foothills of the
mountain. Initially, the Armenian fighters resisted heroically, but
with dwindling food and ammunition supplies the situation deteriorated
quickly.

In an attempt to attract the attention of allied warship crews,
the fighters raised two flags made out of bed sheets that would be
visible from the sea. One of the flags bore a red cross, the other
had "Christians are in danger" written on it. They also made bonfires
around the flags, hoping to draw attention.

Survivors from Musa Dagh with one of the flags noticed by the French
navy, The Graphic, November 13, 1915

On September 5, after nearly a month of fighting, the crew of a French
cruiser called The Guichen spotted the signals. Peter Dimlakian,
a member of the resistance, boarded the ship and spoke directly to
the French command. The French left with a promise to bring relief.

As Vice Admiral Dartige du Fournet wrote in his diary on September
6, 1915, he "received a telegram reporting on this and immediately
sailed in this direction on Jeanne d'Arc." The next day Jeanne d'Arc
approached the coast on a reconnaissance mission. Tigran Andreasyan,
one of the Armenian leaders, came onboard and asked for at least the
civilians - women, children and the elderly - to be evacuated. He
was once again promised that French navy would help.

"I realized that we had to help these miserable people," du Fournet
wrote in his diary. He sent an emergency telegram to the high command,
but was still extremely concerned about the complex bureaucracy back
in France.

At the risk of tarnishing his career, he gave the order to send all
cruisers at his disposal to Musa Dagh to begin evacuations immediately.

In his own words, "The time was scarce and whatever they [the high
command] told us, it was necessary to evacuate all of them."

Louis Dartige du Fournet, Armenian Genocide Museum Institute collection

The vice admiral also contacted the British authorities in Cyprus and
Egypt, asking them to shelter the refugees. His request was denied at
first, but he soon managed to convince the allies to set up a refugee
camp in Port Said, Egypt, without the consent of his senior command.

On September 10, 1915, on the 41st day of the resistance, two French
warships began bombing Ottoman positions around Musa Dagh in a
cover operation. On September 12, five French cruisers - Le Guichen,
L'Amiral Charner, Le Desaix, La Foudre and Le D'Estrées approached
the shore, cast anchor and dropped boats. Tiran Tekeyan, an officer
of Armenian origin on Le Desaix, coordinated the rescue operation,
which lasted three days. First the women, children and the old people
were evaculated, then the armed forces.

The total number of those rescued was 4,058. It included 1,563
children, several of whom had been born during the operation itself.

Some children born on board were named Guichen in honor of the first
cruiser whose crew had noticed the signal from Musa Dagh.

"There were poor little newborns among them wrapped in towels. The
Mussalertsi children were passed from hand to hand through the roar
of waves. They pulled through the waters and will never know what
kind of danger they managed to escape in reality," du Founet wrote
in his diary.

Refugees from Musa Dagh boarding French ships, The Sphere, October
30, 1915

When the refugees reached Egypt, they were offered shelter, food,
healthcare and schooling, as Dartige had arranged.

Three months after the evacuation, Dartige received a response to his
initial telegram. It contained only one phrase in French: "Où se
trouve mont Moise?" ("Where is Mount Moses?)" This proved that had
Dartige chosen to follow military procedures and wait for orders,
not a single refugee would have survived.

On October 10, 1915 du Fournet was appointed allied commander in the
Mediterranean Sea. In December 1916, after the landing of French
soldiers near Athens, Louis Dartige Du Fournet was dismissed. He
never had children and married a widow after his dismissal. He lived
in a small villa near St. Chamassy in southwestern France. Du Fournet
died in 1940 and was buried in St. Chamassy. At the time of his death,
and for many decades after, the French population knew nothing about
his rescue efforts.

However, in 2010, Tovmas Aintabian, a descendant of a Musa Dagh
survivor, conducted an investigation into the vice admiral's life
and discovered the location of his hometown, as well as his tomb.

Aintabian contacted the local authorities in St. Chamassy and arranged
a joint ceremony to honor his ancestors' savior. Word of Dartige
Du Fournet spread throughout France, with most French television
channels and newspapers covering the occasion. A marble sculptured flag
depicting the one waved by the freedom fighters was placed on the tomb.

Dartige's tomb has become a pilgrimage site for both Armenians and
French paying homage to the man who risked so much and saved so many.

100 LIVES Research Team http://www.horizonwe...s/details/78763
 



#18 Yervant1

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Posted 05 May 2016 - 09:57 AM

How novel about Armenian Genocide became bestseller in Warsaw ghetto

Werfel's true masterpiece

Holocaust and Heroism Remembrance Day, known colloquially as Yom
HaShoah, is observed as Israel's day of commemoration for the
approximately six million Jews who perished in the Holocaust, and for
the Jewish resistance in the Warsaw ghetto uprising. It was
inaugurated on 1953, and is held on the 27th of Nisan (this year it
coincided with May 5).
May 5, 2016

PanARMENIAN.Net - Edna S. Friedberg, a historian at the United States
Holocaust Memorial Museum wrote an article about the novel The Forty
Days of Musa Dagh by Austrian-Czech writer Franz Werfeland the impact
it had on members of Jewish youth groups marshalling the courage to
revolt. The article, published on The Jewish Daily Forward in 2015,
reads:

“By any measure, the Warsaw Ghetto was hell on earth. An urban prison
zone in the middle of German-occupied Warsaw, after November 1940 the
ghetto was enclosed by a ten-foot high wall that was topped with
barbed wire and tightly guarded. German authorities packed over
400,000 Jews of all ages into an area of just 1.3 square miles, with
an average of 7.2 persons living in each room. Conditions were
miserable: inadequate food, no sanitation, little heat. By mid-1942,
83,000 Jews had died of starvation or disease. Of those who managed to
survive, the German authorities deported almost three hundred thousand
of them to the Treblinka killing center to be gassed.

And yet in Warsaw and many other ghettos across occupied Poland, Jews
organized clandestine schools and libraries, smuggling in books and
other cultural materials in collective acts of spiritual resistance.
Arguably the most popular book in the Warsaw Ghetto was the novel The
Forty Days of Musa Dagh, by Austrian-Czech writer Franz Werfel.

The Nazis had burned Werfel’s earlier writings in May 1933, labeling
them the poison fruits of a Jewish author who advocated pacifism, love
for all mankind, and hostility to extreme nationalism and Nazism.
First published in Austria just a few months after the Nazi book
burnings, Musa Dagh detailed the systematic expulsion and murder of
Armenian Christians by authorities in the Ottoman Empire starting in
1915-16–a series of actions we now call the Armenian Genocide.

Based on actual events, Werfel shone a light on a group of Armenian
men fighting under desperate conditions. Quickly translated from its
original German into many languages, The Forty Days of Musa Dagh was
critically acclaimed and widely read in both the United States and
Europe, except in Nazi Germany where it was soon banned.

Werfel cast the Armenian characters’ armed revolt against their
oppressors in a heroic vein. As the editor of The New York Times Book
Review described the novel in 1934, “[It is a] story which must rouse
the emotions of all human beings… . a story of men accepting the fate
of heroes… . It gives us the lasting sense of participation in a
stirring episode of history.” Just a few years later, Werfel’s tale of
a besieged people taking control of its destiny captured the
imagination of those imprisoned in German ghettos. Copies of the novel
were passed from hand-to-hand among members of Jewish youth groups
marshalling the courage to revolt. When leaders of the underground
movement in the Białystok Ghetto debated whether to take up arms, they
invoked Werfel’s book.

A young man wrote, “Only one thing remains for us: to organize
collective resistance in the ghetto, at any cost; to consider the
ghetto our ‘Musa Dagh’, to write a proud chapter of Jewish Białystok
and our movement into history.” Many leaders of the resistance in the
Warsaw Ghetto also drew strength from the struggle at Musa Dagh.
Across Europe, Jews in mortal danger looked back one generation to the
annihilation of the Armenians and saw themselves.

We study history for inspiration and for warning. But first we must
remember–and the Armenian Genocide has been almost totally forgotten
in this country. In 1915 alone, The New York Times published 145
stories about Ottoman attacks, including startling death tolls.

Millions of Americans supported food and clothing drives to help
Armenian refugees in what may have been the first public charitable
appeal of its scale. Yet how many Americans today have even heard of
the atrocities that rallied their great-grandparents to action?

Raphael Lemkin, the man who coined the word “genocide” in 1944 and who
himself was deeply influenced by Armenian suffering, wrote that “the
function of memory is not only to register past events, but to
stimulate human conscience.”

Haunted by the loss of his own family during the Holocaust, Lemkin
declared, “I have transformed my personal disaster into a moral
striking force.”

If we forget what happened in 1915, which forces truly prevail? Which
books will guide our actions?”

https://urldefense.p...1Ha8OzHvKma4&e=
 


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