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#340368 Sos Vilage Artsakh

Posted by gamavor on 25 January 2017 - 09:53 AM


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#342144 WESTERN ARMENIA (Videos)

Posted by Arshak1946 on 26 October 2017 - 11:43 AM

 

4 Minutes of video about Western Armenia , I hope video interest you.

 

Best Regards


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#341989 Trekking in Armenia

Posted by gamavor on 05 October 2017 - 01:12 PM

American - Armenian guy trekking experience from South to North.
 
A little bit crazy in my view but commendable. I did something similar but not that extreme.






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#341986 Armenian-Produced Electric Car Debuts

Posted by onjig on 05 October 2017 - 10:13 AM

Armenian-Produced Electric Car Debuts at DigiTec Tech Expo in Yerevan

 

YEREVAN—An Armenian-made electric car debuted at the 13th annual DigiTec tech expo, which opened in Yerevan earlier today. The electric-powered, self-driving car, which was assembled in Armenia by National Instruments, was unveiled at the “Engineering City” pavilion of the three-day exhibition.

 

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An Armenian-made electric car debuted at the 13th annual DigiTec tech expo (Photo: Mediamax)

 

“The whole world is working on [electric cars] and we should do the same in Armenia,” National Instruments’ Ruben Simonyan told Yerevan-based Itel.am. “We need to increase the number of electric cars and the percentage of self-driving or driver assistance systems. We’re exhibiting the electric car we assembled in Armenia. Essentially, it’s a continuation of our engineering culture. This isn’t a novelty. The first electric car was assembled in Armenia back in 1975. Now we should extend that culture,” said Simonyan.

The car is equipped with several driver-assist devices, such as radars, a camera, and laser equipment. Though the sensors and equipment were not produced in Armenia, National Instruments worked on the design and testing of the entire system.

“To make sure that the car will operate smoothly in different situations, you need to drive millions of kilometers. Producers used to do exactly that and some of them still do,” Simonyan explained. “But that requires too much time and expense, which affects the car’s price. Our testing doesn’t require driving millions of kilometers in specialized areas. We can simulate the same scenario for several times to make sure the system is working fine.”

A team of around 20 engineers and designers worked on designing and testing the car, collaborating with several foreign companies.

DigiTec is the largest technological exhibition of the region and runs Sep. 29-Oct. 1 at the Yerevan Expo Center.

https://armenianweek...xpo-in-yerevan/


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#341762 Irina Bokova the bolshevic slut

Posted by gamavor on 06 September 2017 - 08:10 AM

All these should not stop here. Armenian authorities through diplomatic channels as well as the UN should request thorough investigation, esp. with regards to Bokova end company.

For Christ sake, on top of everything she gave UNESCO's Mozart prize to Mehriban Alieva. The later I'm sure did not know how to hold a violin.
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#341733 Irina Bokova the bolshevic slut

Posted by gamavor on 05 September 2017 - 06:35 AM

Before being accused of using harsh language, I would like to explain my words. Irina Bokova is an offspring of Georgi Bokov - a prominent Bulgarian communist rumored that is responsible for the murder of a prominent Bulgarian intellectual and political figure Rajko Alexsiev after the communist takeover of the country. Since the data are very scares of what exactly happened, it is proved that her father was instrumental in the torture of Rajko Alexsiev before his death. Sons and daughters are not responsible for the deeds of their parents, but having been raised in communist Bulgaria and knowing pretty well the background of her surrounding and political elites at the time, she could not know that the foundation which sponsored the event in Paris promoting the "tolerance" of Azerbaijan where everything Armenian is simply banned, is named after Geidar Aliev - the father of the present president of Azerbaijan, and that the former, before becoming a president of Azerbaijan was the head of the KGB in USSR - the most humanistic organization ever! Is sounds like a joke but the truth is that a foundation named after a communist monster sponsors an event to promote the tolerance of Azerbaijan and the chief of UNESCO, Irina Bokova gladly accepts such sponsorship???

What a world we live in!
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#341407 silversmiths of Kayseri who created beautiful silver covers for Armeni

Posted by MosJan on 15 July 2017 - 11:29 AM

Learn about the Armenian silversmiths of Kayseri who created beautiful silver covers for Armenian manuscripts. Three of these covers are in the collection of the Morgan Library & Museum in New York.


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#340809 The World according to ancient Rome

Posted by gamavor on 11 April 2017 - 02:24 AM

https://scontent.fso...f7a&oe=598A20E1
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#340200 Բեխալաթ

Posted by Yervant1 on 03 January 2017 - 02:45 PM

I think, it means mistake or a flaw and the բեխալատ would be the opposite of flaw, I mean flawless. I'm just going with the sentence structure and the Arabic word Khalat means mistake or a flaw, maybe that's where the origin is.

I hope this helps.

I believe the babies flaw is not falling sleep. The last sentence which says that you have one flaw, you don't sleep and stay awake. 


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#339824 Autumn of my Homeland

Posted by onjig on 13 October 2016 - 11:57 AM


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#337201 Armenia develops water-saving innovative fertilizer

Posted by gamavor on 12 January 2016 - 10:44 AM

http://news.am/eng/news/305729.html

YEREVAN. A new fertilizer has been developed in Armenia, and to save water.

Director of Eco Technology company, Ashot Baghdasaryan, told Armenian News-NEWS.am that the granules of this fertilizer collect the water from the soil, and return it to the plant when and as needed.

And the granules of our fertilizer not only accumulate water, but also the useful nutrients, Baghdasaryan explained.

In addition, this fertilizer eliminates excess water, so that the roots of the plants do not decay.

As per the company manager, this fertilizer helps to increase crop yields by 40 to 60 percent.

Furthermore, this material biologically decomposes, and therefore it leaves no residues in the soil.

The fertilizer, which is called Aquasource, underwent several tests among volunteer farmers.

Also, it is tested with a number of international projects.

Ashot Baghdasaryan said Iran, Russia, the US, India, the United Arab Emirates, and even in distant South Africa and Namibia are interested in this new fertilizer.
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#337198 Do you trust Russia or the United States more and why?

Posted by Yervant1 on 11 January 2016 - 01:27 PM

The chances that Russia will help us to free Western Armenia is as much as the help that we will get from the rest of the world, which is zero. We should rely on ourselves only.


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#326557 A CHRISTMAS CARD TO ONE AND ALL

Posted by Yervant1 on 19 December 2014 - 10:42 AM

A CHRISTMAS CARD TO ONE AND ALL

The Harvell Gazette, MA
Dec 18 2014

Tom Vartabedian Haverhill Gazette

Hard to believe that I've waited until close to the last moment to
wish everyone a joyful Christmas.

It's only because I'm strapped for cash after going bonkers this year
and decided I'd use my best resources to get the word out.

Nothing easier and cheaper than to convey my intentions through
this Almanac column. It's okay. You don't have to reciprocate. I get
enough afterthoughts leading up to the New Year and beyond, if you
count Armenian Christmas on Jan. 6.

So let's begin by wishing my family the very best -- my wife, Nancy,
with whom I'll be celebrating our 50th anniversary on Feb. 19. I
chose that date because it was her birthday and I couldn't think of
a better time to exchange our vows.

Cheers go out to the other three favorite people in my life --
children Sonya, Ara and Raffi -- and the six grandchildren in our
lives. Get set for Disneyworld, guys. We've got a lot of celebrating
to do this February in the land of unbroken dreams.

Let's hit the newspaper crowd next -- editor Bill Cantwell, who
peruses my columns each week and makes them readable, along with
climbing cohorts Dave Dyer, Paul Tennant and Mike LaBella. I still
remember that time we got stranded on Mount Katahdin in Maine and
spent the night on a rock studying the stars. Turned out to be a
pretty decent Almanac, as I recall.

You'll find me three afternoons a week playing racquetball at
the Haverhill YMCA. Maybe George Yell will let me win a game this
Christmas. Welcome Clint "CJ" Clay. You're the next generation. I
marvel at the job Executive Director Tracy Fuller does in keeping
that facility intact. Kudos to you, too.

You'll also see me browsing up a storm at the library -- a true
resource for our community -- and all that it avails to me, whether
books, CDs or DVDs. I am proud to admit that both my sons secured
their Eagle Scout badges by doing community projects for the library.

Not a bad consideration for any good scout.

As the 100th anniversary of the Armenian Genocide approaches in 2015,
the congregation at our Armenian Church at Hye Pointe is already at
work planning a milestone commemoration in the community. Watch for
details. While I'm at it, good luck to all those involved with the
church's building project in Ward Hill. It's been a long time in
the making.

Greetings and salutations go out to my doctor, Peter Rees, for keeping
me agile. He sets a fine example for health and fitness. And to my
cardiologist Salmon (Sonny) Ghiasuddin for saving me from expiration --
not once but twice. It's been 10 years since I've become "pipe free."

Same goes for Dr. Alan Gonick and his staff at Greenleaf. Be true to
your teeth -- otherwise they will become false. He makes a root canal
seem so tolerable. My sentiments also go out to Dr. Alvin Yadgood,
my oral surgeon at Northern Essex. I cannot say enough about implants.

I marvel at the work being done by cohorts Kathy Bresnahan and Rita
LaBella in organizing a myriad of activities at the Council on Aging.

There's no reason why any senior citizen in this city should be bored.

The guy behind it all is head honcho Vinny Ouellette, who seems to
have more arms than an octopus.

The ping-pong vibrations you may hear Monday nights come from West
Meadow Road, where some pretty hot table tennis activity is heard. Bob
Baillargeron and Malcolm Anderson are two fine players who don't act
their age. May their paddles always keep them young.

Special Christmas greetings go out to the sick and the infirmed of
this city, those who will spend the holiday in hospitals and nursing
homes. It's not the place you want to be. May you be joined by family
and friends.

Extended wishes are conveyed to the caregivers and medical support
staffers who must work this day to keep the health system mobilized
and in good hands. Santa applauds you.

Here's a greeting to all the police and firefighters who maintain
their constant vigil, holidays or not. And to all those who do not
celebrate Christmas. May some of you get caught up in the spirit,
whether you're a Christian or not.

For one brief day, bury all the bad news and put a moratorium on crime
and punishment. Let's finally end this terrible plight in the Middle
East and live in a world where peace and harmony work hand-in-hand.

Above all, let's put Christ back into Christmas and honor the day
for what it was intended.

If you're looking for the perfect last-minute gift, try this. Human
kindness costs nothing and goes the furthest.


http://www.hgazette....5dfd60004c.html
 

 


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#301582 Repat Armenia

Posted by Nané on 28 January 2013 - 12:35 PM


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#299973 Man oh man does Armenia have a way with you!

Posted by man on 19 December 2012 - 03:24 AM

Post-Armenia Blues

Posted on December 15, 2012

Nathalie Kazandjian aka Nat K
(Canada, AVC ‘ 12)

The "Welcome Home Natty" poster along with friends and family were what greeted me as I made my way past the Arrival gates of the Montreal Trudeau Airport. In that instant, I felt pretty good about coming home. However, as the days went by, the post-Armenia blues violently kicked in as soon as I found myself doing the same old things I used to do. Suddenly, things that seemed so familiar felt foreign and strange. It was a whole new culture shock but it was real and unfortunately, there wasn’t much I could do about it. The problem was not coming home to friends and family. The problem itself was leaving Armenia. For the little bit that I was back, I couldn’t even look at my photos nor talk about it for fear of being overcome with even more heartbreak and anguish than I already felt. I missed everything and everyone that belonged to my life in Armenia.

Before I know it, I found myself longing for Armenia. I missed waking up every morning to hearing my host mother say “ Parev parev garmir arev siroon jan”. I missed walking down 58 district to catch the marshrutka, 100 drams in hand and giving my regular Parev to the locals. I missed walking home from work and being greeted by the cutest little munchkins from my neighborhood showering me with hugs and kisses. I missed finishing the night off with a nice cup of MacCoffee alongside my host sisters while watching Armenian soap operas. I missed staying up with Nvartig, my baby host sister, till late at night drawing, coloring, playing cards, checkers, chess and teaching her English. I missed going to Ponchig Monchig and ordering a ridiculous amount of food. I missed going to the khorovadz place near the OLA center and engaging into a 45 minute conversation with the cook each and every time. I missed getting a ridiculous amount of daily texts and reminders from Allegra. I missed joining my Armenian brothers and sisters over weekend excursions. I missed running in the SAS supermarket and yelling like a crazy person “where’s the Ttvaser ?” before boarding our marshrukta to head back home. As well, as Heeng dzap, Marshrukta 9, besties crew, whatever your face, tracking down wifi, Le Cafe and Sevan’s inspirational speeches among many other things.

The desire to connect to people and the joy of making the connection was life affirming. The physical intensity of the excursions was invigorating. The time walking alone, listening to my own footsteps, sitting in the marshrukta watching the sunset, gazing at the stars was refreshing. Most of all, I long for the way I felt when I was in the Motherland. I felt alive, free, inspired and grateful. Man oh man does Armenia have a way with you. Each and every day there was a goal and an accomplishment that could be measured in different ways: in kilometers, in hugs, in the number of times I laughed out loud.

Although I was only gone for two months and while nothing has changed at home, everything has changed within me. Living in Armenia, gave me a deep appreciation of my life – where I live, where I work, my family and my friends. It also made me appreciate things that we too often take for granted such as the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, weeping eyes, all of which have the potential to turn a life around.

To travel to Armenia is to truly take a journey within yourself. When we leave the comfort of home and everything that we have grown to be accustomed to, we often live more simply, with no more possessions than we can carry. We tend to surrender ourselves by becoming much more accepting to the twists, turns and little surprises that life has to offer. I came to Armenia searching for answers. Instead, I left in search of better questions. Sometimes, the unexpected is just what is needed to put life into perspective.

So here I am, back to my same old routine of stop and go, impatiently waiting to graduate just to start a new adventure. All the while feeling nostalgic about my time in Armenia which can feel heavier than the far too many pounds gained abroad.

When I think about it, perhaps the post-Armenia blues is something you can never truly let go of. For it that where we love is home, home that our feet may leave, but not our hearts.

To sign off, I simply cannot say goodbye to those whom I have grown to love, for the memories we have made will last a lifetime and never a goodbye. None of this would have been possible without Birthright Armenia & Armenian Volunteer Corps. For those of you who are thinking of joining the program, I encourage you to take a leap and go for it. Armenia 2012 always in my heart.
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#332644 Farewell Dear Arpa

Posted by Vanetsi on 28 May 2015 - 10:06 AM

I always looked forward to hearing his input. He was very knowledgable on a broad range of topics. His depth of knowledge gave this forum another dimension. He will be dearly missed. RIP Arpa.


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#328646 Anya Pogharian invents $500 dialysis machine

Posted by Yervant1 on 09 February 2015 - 11:43 AM

CANADIAN ANYA POGHARIAN INVENTS NEW DIALYSIS MACHINE

February 9, 2015

CBC, Montreal - Seventeen-year-old Anya Pogharian's high school science
project could end up changing the way dialysis care is delivered.

After poring over online dialysis machine owner's manuals, she
developed a new prototype using simple technology.

While machines currently cost about $30,000, hers would cost just
$500 -- making it more affordable for people to buy and have at home.

Pogharian was inspired by volunteering at a hospital dialysis unit.

When she was assigned a high school science project, she chose to work
on a new kind of dialysis unit. She spent 300 hours on her invention --
well above and beyond the mandatory 10 hours.

Dialysis is the process of cleaning waste from the blood. It's
typically used for people who have kidney disease. The treatment
takes about four hours a couple times per week.

Pogharian said she wanted to find a way to improve the procedure,
which can be hard on patients.

"It takes a lot of energy out of them," said Pogharian. "They're very
tired after a dialysis treatment."

"You wouldn't have to make your way to the hospital, which is a
problem for a lot of patients. It's not necessarily easy to make
your way to the hospital three times a week, especially it you have
limited mobility," she said.

Testing it out

Her project has earned her a slew of scholarships and awards. Now,
Hema-Quebec has offered her a summer internship, to try out her
invention with real blood.

"All the population will benefit from that kind of instrument that
will reduce medical care cost, hospitalization stays. Basically,
it's a great idea," said Louis Thibault, director of applied research
at Hema-Quebec.

Pogharian said she hopes one day, her invention will be used overseas.

"Ten per cent of patients living in India and Pakistan who need
the treatment can't afford it or can't have it in any way. It's not
accessible. So that motivated me."

But Pogharian says she's focusing on doing well on her CEGEP midterm
exams.

http://www.horizonwe...s/details/61238


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#322302 The City older than Rome

Posted by onjig on 29 August 2014 - 12:05 PM


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#312495 DONATE to Artsakh & Armenia, 16th Telethon NOW!

Posted by man on 19 November 2013 - 02:57 PM

telethon2013bnr.png

On November 28th, 2013, Armenia Fund’s 16th International Telethon to put northern regions in the spotlight. But you do not have to wait for 28th the Thanksgiving Day holiday, you can go to the site now or anytime and make your donation early :
http://armeniafundus...19-telethon.htm
In the site there is the a list of TV stations and channel guides, and times, of each state where the telethon will be aired live.
A donation of $365 will cover the cost of construction of 1.5 meters of the new highway.


The road from Vardenis in Armenia to Mardakert in Karabakh, totals 117 kilometers (72 miles), estimated cost $30M. Over 150,000 residents and 30 communities stand to benefit from the new highway. It covers such varied terrain that there are multiple construction, engineering, and public safety challenges involved. There is a significant stretch of unpaved, dirt-covered road that changes dramatically in width at different intervals and involves as many as 16 bridges and overpasses, 339 sharp turns, 17 of which are serpentine configurations. Other sections have been partially blocked due to landslides or river swells, adding to the hazardous conditions. Finally, new road signage, protective barriers and other modern standards of road safety must be installed to meet current safety standards and government regulations. The constructor will provide 5-year warranty for the road.

Building an alternate route between Armenia and Karabakh is the designated campaign theme of the upcoming Armenia Fund’s 16th International Thanksgiving Day Telethon. The goal of this massive public works effort is to turn the roads that currently link a string of strategically important towns in northern Armenia and northern Karabakh into a modern highway system. The new route is projected to promote trade, cooperation, and economic development among vulnerable border communities that are vital to national security.
http://armeniafundusa.org/

 

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Armenia Fund USA

80 Maiden Lane, Suite 2205

New York, NY 10038

USA

 

212.689.5307 Phone

212.689.5317 fax

 

info@armeniafundusa.org

www.armeniafundusa.org


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#298777 Woman Of The Day

Posted by MosJan on 20 November 2012 - 05:31 PM

"A reporter asked couple: How did you manage to stay together for 65 years?"
The woman replied: "We were born in a time when if something was broken we would fix it, not throw it away..."

Posted Image
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