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1700 years of Christianity!!!


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#41 Guest__*

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Posted 08 January 2001 - 09:23 AM

quote:
Originally posted by Berj:
Astvats chani MJ jan

You should be in the government.


Dear Berj,

I have made my choice more than 10 years ago.

#42 Guest__*

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Posted 09 January 2001 - 12:19 AM

Armenians Carrying A 1,700-Yr.-Old Flame
BY CHARLES W. BELL

Daily News (New York)
January 6, 2001, Saturday

A GUY IN the gift shop at St. Vartan's Cathedral, in midtown
Manhattan, was listing the pros and cons of the Armenian
celebration of Christmas, which is today.

"At least we don't have to put up with Alvin and the Chipmunks," he
said.

And then somebody reminded him that it was an Armenian, Ross
Bagdasarian, who created Alvin in 1958 and who wrote the song that
became an annual novelty hit.

"Who knew?" he said.

Actually, a lot of people might ask the same thing about the timing
of the Armenian Christmas.

Armenians celebrate it Jan. 6 because they use both lunar and
solar calculations to set dates for religious holidays. As far as
anyone knows, no other major religious community observes Christmas
on that date.

Among other things, this means that Armenians greet each other
"Happy New Year and Merry Christmas," reversing the usual order,
because New Year's - not being a religious holiday for them - is
celebrated Jan. 1.

Millions of other Christians - almost all members of Eastern
Orthodox churches established after a split with Rome in the 11th
century - celebrate Christmas tomorrow. This is because they go
strictly by the Julian, or lunar, calendar. For most Christians,
Jan. 6 is a significant holiday - it's the Epiphany, which,
depending on church doctrine or tradition, celebrates the three
kings' visit to see Jesus and give him gifts, or Christ's baptism.

But Epiphany is not an Armenian holiday.

"It gets so confusing," says Chris Zakian, spokesman for Archbishop
Khajag Barsamian, the spiritual leader of the eastern diocese of
the Armenian Church of America. He is the chief shepherd of all
Armenians who live east of the Rocky Mountains.

Adding to the confusion for many Christians is that only Armenians
combine holidays celebrating the birth of Jesus and his baptism.

This adds an additional colorful rite to the Christmas service - a
ceremony called the "Blessing of the Water," commemorating the
baptism of Christ. At the end of the service, worshippers receive
tiny samples of the water just blessed by Barsamian.

Some worshippers drink it immediately. Some keep it until the next
Christmas. Some give it to a needy or sick person.

This is Barsamian's 10th anniversary as archbishop - he was elected
by clergy and lay Armenians in May 1990 - but that milestone moment
is overshadowed by another.

The service today marks the beginning of the 1,700th anniversary of
Armenia's officially becoming Christian, the first country in the
world to do so.

Based on historical documents from the Fourth and Fifth centuries,
Armenians date the founding of Christianity in their homeland as
A.D. 301. Legend has it that St. Gregory the Illuminator, patron
saint of Armenia, was imprisoned for 13 years for preaching
Christianity. Upon his release, he converted King Tiridates III.

A year-long celebration of the 1,700th anniversary began last night
at the cathedral.

Barsamian distributed a symbolic "Light of St. Gregory" to two
youngsters from each of the 59 parishes under his command around
the country. They will carry the lights home to their own
churches.

Barsamian brought the light to New York at midweek from
Etchmiadzin, spiritual and administrative center of the church.
But this was no ordinary flight.

Because he was carrying live fire, Barsamian could not travel by
commercial plane or land at JFK, LaGuardia or Newark airports. A
Pennsylvania parishioner loaned him a private jet, which landed at
Islip, L.I.

The fire was in a lantern lit - during elaborate ceremonies in
Etchmiadzin - by candles that burn at the Khor Virab prison where
Gregory allegedly was held.

Every diocesan bishop in the world took fire home, and today, like
Barsamian, they will pass it along to young people in their cities
and towns.

ALL THE PARISHIONERS at St. Vartan, and elsewhere, also can let a
little light shine - at home, work or wherever - as the cathedral
is giving everybody a tiny lantern with a little easy-to-light
wick.

It will make for an interesting moment for the faithful, who, for
the only time in their lives, will get both fire and water from an
archbishop.

#43 Guest__*

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Posted 12 January 2001 - 05:53 PM

EWTN

12-Jan-2001 -- Church News
ARMENIA CELEBRATES 1700 YEARS OF EVANGELIZATION

Rome, 12 (NE) Armenia will celebrate this year the 1700th anniversary
of its conversion to Christianity, which took place in the year 301,
recalled this week the Patriarch of the Armenian Catholics Nerses
Bedros XIX. In a message sent to Armenian faithful in Lebanon and in
other parts of the world, the Patriarch stressed that the celebration
must be an occasion of deep inner renewal, both in the spiritual and
daily life. Meanwhile, it was announced that the Holy See will
prepare a series of special medals to commemorate the event. Also, as
part of the celebrations, Pope John Paul II will preside a Mass in
St. Peter's Basilica on February 18, attended by Armenian Catholics
from all over the world headed by Patriarch Nerses Bedros XIX.
Armenia became in the year 301 the first kingdom to convert to the
Catholic faith, with the baptism of the king. Much of the
evangelization was encouraged by St. Gregory the Illuminator, and it
became a base for the evangelization of several regions in the
Caucasus.

#44 Guest__*

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Posted 14 January 2001 - 04:07 PM

I suspect it has gone unnoticed. Pay attention to the recognition from the highlighted text!

quote:
Originally posted by MJ:
Armenia became in the year 301 the first kingdom to convert to the Catholic faith, with the baptism of the king.


#45 Guest__*

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Posted 14 January 2001 - 04:34 PM

quote:
Originally posted by MJ:
I suspect it has gone unnoticed. Pay attention to the recognition from the highlighted text!




Catholic??? Weren't there only orthodox first and then catholics, protestants etc.?

#46 Guest__*

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Posted 14 January 2001 - 08:32 PM

Before the Chalcedonian Council, I think 451A.D., when the issue of the Holly Trinity was brought forward, there was only one Church, and it was non-denominational.

If there was at any time something called Orthodox Church, that means also that there was a non-orthodox Church. Therefore, the Orthodox Church could've not preceded the Catholic Church - they had to be formed at the same time. As to the Protestant Church, it has been indeed formed much later.

#47 Guest__*

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Posted 14 January 2001 - 10:42 PM

quote:
Originally posted by MJ:
Before the Chalcedonian Council, I think 451A.D., when the issue of the Holly Trinity was brought forward, there was only one Church, and it was non-denominational.



That is true. So, we can claim to be the first Orthodox as well as Catholics. By the way Armenian church can not be considered ether pure Orthodox or pure Catholic, consequently it is both. Or simply it is called Apostolic, Gregorian, and Lusavorchakan, which are used interchangeably.




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