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What Happened to the Colombo Yogurt


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#1 onjig

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Posted 20 December 2019 - 01:42 PM

You are here: Home / Food History / What Happened to the Colombo Yogurt I Remember Since Childhood?
What Happened to the Colombo Yogurt I Remember Since Childhood?

 

FEBRUARY 10, 2014

 BY ERICT_CULINARYLORE

 

colombo-yogurt.jpg?resize=260%2C314&ssl=


 

Colombo yogurt was the first U.S. yogurt brand. It got its start in 1929 when Armenian immigrants Rose and Sarkis Colombosian began jarring and selling their family yogurt in Andover, Massachusetts. The yogurt they made in America was the same they had made in the old-country, and based on a traditional Armenian recipe. Along with their sons, the couple hand-filled every jar, and sold it to neighbors and friends.

The Colombosians, who had arrived in Chicago in 1917 but then moved to Lawrence, Massachusetts, bought a small dairy farm in nearby Andover they called Wild Rose Dairy. The family made yogurt and a drink called ayran from their milk. When they began producing more milk than they could sell or use themselves, they decided to make yogurt that they would also sell along their milk route.

 

In fact, the Colombosian’s first customers were the local Syrian, Lebanese, Greek, or Armenian immigrants, all of which came from cultures with a yogurt tradition. It proved a good business, as these local hard-working folks were busy working in mills or other occupations and had no time to make their own yogurt the old way. The Colombosians priced their yogurt low enough so that it was as economical to buy as to make at home.In

From local dairy routes, the family began targeting Middle Eastern grocery shops. American owned grocery stores were not a likely sale since yogurt was still an unknown food to most Americans. They managed to get their yogurt into two stores in Watertown owned by the Mulgars. The Mulgars would later open a Massachusetts supermarket chain called Star Markets, which would also carry Colombo.

 

https://culinarylore...colombo-yogurt/

Colombo yogurt was the first U.S. yogurt brand. It got its start in 1929 when Armenian immigrants Rose and Sarkis Colombosian began jarring and selling their family yogurt in Andover, Massachusetts. The yogurt they made in America was the same they had made in the old-country, and based on a traditional Armenian recipe. Along with their sons, the couple hand-filled every jar, and sold it to neighbors and friends.

The Colombosians, who had arrived in Chicago in 1917 but then moved to Lawrence, Massachusetts, bought a small dairy farm in nearby Andover they called Wild Rose Dairy. The family made yogurt and a drink called ayran from their milk. When they began producing more milk than they could sell or use themselves, they decided to make yogurt that they would also sell along their milk route.


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#2 onjig

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Posted 20 December 2019 - 01:43 PM

Ann-Hermes-Staff-Photo-The-Eagle-Tribune

 

Bob Colombosian, Whose Family Popularized Yogurt in North America, Dies at 92

Colombosian, Robert “Bob” 92, a longtime resident of Andover, Mass. passed away peacefully at home with his loving family by his side on April 30, 2018. Born on Dec. 8, 1925, Bob was the son […]

 

https://armenianweek...tuaries/page/4/


Edited by onjig, 20 December 2019 - 01:44 PM.


#3 MosJan

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Posted 21 December 2019 - 12:25 PM

RIP


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