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Armenia signs contract to build nuclear plant


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#1 Harut

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Posted 07 June 2009 - 03:11 PM

Armenia signs contract to build nuclear plant
Associated Press, 06.04.09, 09:53 AM EDT

YEREVAN, Armenia -- Armenia has signed the first contract for the building of an atomic energy plant to replace its aging Soviet-era plant.

Energy Minister Armen Movsisian says international engineering firm Worley Parsons won the $460 million contract to manage the project.

He said Thursday the project's overall cost is estimated at $4.5 billion.

It is scheduled to be completed by 2017 at the site of the existing Medzamor plant, about 30 kilometers (20 miles) west of the capital, Yerevan.

Experts have warned for years that the Medzamor plant has safety flaws and should be shut down.

Armenia has long resisted shutting it down because it supplies nearly 40 percent of the country's power.

http://www.forbes.co.../ap6504365.html

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no word on it in any of the armenian media sources...

#2 Azat

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Posted 07 June 2009 - 03:32 PM

thats great news. I wonder how the county will be able to support such a huge cost but if we can that incredibly good

#3 hosank

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Posted 08 June 2009 - 09:07 AM

we should ask the azeris to finance it lol

#4 Arpa

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Posted 08 June 2009 - 03:13 PM

QUOTE (Harut @ Jun 7 2009, 10:11 PM)
YEREVAN, Armenia -- Armenia has signed the first contract for the building of an atomic energy plant to replace its aging..
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He said Thursday the project's overall cost is estimated at $4.5 billion.
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It is scheduled to be completed by 2017 at the site of the existing Medzamor plant, about 30 kilometers (20 miles) west of the capital, Yerevan.
================
no word on it in any of the armenian media sources...

I know next to nothing about nuclear energy, nuclear power plants and their structure.
We read the planned new and improved plant will be built at the site of present Metsamor. Why? What is so magical about that site? Besides, it will cost twice more to dismantle the existing structure. Why canít it be built at another site, further inside Armenia, like in Vayots Dzor or even Syunik where it will be closer to the potentially Eastern Armenia, Artsakh. And when the time comes Metsamor can be decommissioned and converted to a monument-museum. The town of Metsamor is a valuable archeological, historical site all by itself.
As to the cost and financing, we export electricity now as is. Assuming the new structure will have even more capacity the neighbors can invest in it and eventually be paid in kind.
In addition. Metsamor is located in one very few flat and open lands. Would it not be better it be rebuilt in less accessible location, I.e surrounded and protected by mountains and valleys?


#5 DominO

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Posted 08 June 2009 - 08:06 PM

QUOTE (Azat @ Jun 7 2009, 05:32 PM)
thats great news. I wonder how the county will be able to support such a huge cost but if we can that incredibly good


Will probably be run by a Russian private compagny, then other projects of 'oil in exchange for electricity' will be used. Part of the electricity will probably be exported to Iran and even Turkey. Armenia will also be recieving funds, I don't have the lists right now, but I've found it somewhere, maybe someone has it.

When you can't pay, just sell it, almighty capitalism. smile.gif

#6 DominO

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Posted 08 June 2009 - 08:08 PM

It's not different than the current 2 reactors, which are run by a Russian compagny.

#7 Arpa

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Posted 17 June 2009 - 07:20 AM

Above I wrote that the power can be sold to the neighbors. How does one stop our "neighbors" from buying stocks and interests in the project?
What do you think?
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WHAT DOES TURKEY HAVE TO DO WITH OUR NUCLEAR POWER STATION?

Aravot
April 18 2009
Armenia

Out of the 200 people interviewed 92 per cent were against the idea
of selling stocks of the new Armenian nuclear power station to Turkish
companies. Only 1.5 per cent supported the idea.

On 12 March 2009 the Ararat strategic centre conducted a series of
interviews regarding the recent intergovernmental developments between
Armenia and Turkey. Around 200 people were interviewed, including
government officials, politicians, public and cultural figures,
analysts and students. One of the interview topics was Turkey's
probable participation in the construction of a new Armenian nuclear
power station. Let us present some responses, particularly to the
question "What kind of national security problems could be encountered
if Turkey participated in the construction of the atomic station? Do
you agree with the idea of selling stocks of a new Armenian nuclear
power station to Turkish companies?"

Haroutyun Arakelyan, chairperson of the Armenian Democratic Liberal
Party's board says: "There is no sense even to discuss what kind
of national security issues could arise. We make ourselves energy
dependent upon a government with whom we have problems at different
levels. What if they sell their stocks, e.g. to Azerbaijan? How are
we going to stop it? What international standards are we going to
use to stipulate our disagreement? Does the Armenian prime minister
have replies to those questions? If anything of the kind happens I
will be one of those who will struggle against it and shall involve
my friends and the mass media from the diaspora."

Head of the Psychological Studies Centre Albert Nalchadjyan said:
"No matter how much I respect our Prime Minister Tigran Sargsyan
(competent, good specialist in finances, works effectively) it seems to
me that he made a thoughtless step. Turkey has nothing to do with the
Armenian nuclear power system. Turkey, in general, should be isolated
from the most important and strategic issues of Armenia." He added:
"We should not sign such strategic and long term agreements with
Turkey, even if the deal is profitable for us. We should not depend
upon Turkey in order to be able to tackle our national problems. It
will be good if the prime minister makes statement and takes back
his previous announcement. It is not good to play with Turkey. Its
long-term goal is to get rid of Armenia and join Azerbaijan in creating
a great Pan-Turkish state. I am against not only Turkey's participation
on the nuclear station issue but also against the opening of borders
since our economy is weak. The opening of borders should be delayed
as long as possible or otherwise our economy will sink."

Doctor of Economic Sciences Tatul Manaseryan said: "It is unacceptable
and unreasonable to involve into the structure of a strategic
importance institution a county that has no basic diplomatic relations
with us; a country which is currently considered our potential
enemy and a threat to us." We also asked him why on March 12, 20 days
after his first statement, the prime minister of the Armenian Republic
changed his position and announced that Turkey is expected to make only
financial contribution through selling part of the Armenian nuclear
power station stocks to Turkish companies. Tatul Manasaeryan, who is
currently adviser to the speaker of the National Assembly, replied:
"Inconsistency is the prime minister's nature. Several years ago he
rejected our proposal to create free economic zones in Armenia. But
once he heard a similar advice from the Russian Federation,
in particular from [Russian Transport Minister] Igor Levitin, he
portrayed the creation of such zones in Armenia as his own initiative."

National Artist of the USSR Sos Sargsyan said: "We should not let
Turks poke their noses into Armenia. It is full of unpredictable
consequences. We should be vigilant. We have history and we should not
forget it. We know how the genocide happened... Besides, why should
they come? What have they to do with our atomic station? Since when
are the Turks constructors? Their priority is destruction. What are
they going to build for us? We do not want their construction. They
will do something treacherous here as well."

Karine Danielyan, doctor of geographical sciences and head of the
association For Sustainable Human Development said: "No need to blow
up the atomic station (though I do not exclude that as well). It
is quite enough t o arrange a radioactive substance leakage to the
water reservoir of the Ararat valley which is located right under
the station."

Journalist and expert on the Caucasus issues Tatul Hakobyan said:
"Our officials know quite well which direction the wind blows. If
during Kocharyan's tenure for some officials, political forces
and journalist-analysts it was gainful to condemn Turkey and the
Turks, nowadays it is not. The same officials, politicians and
journalist-analysts see how [Armenian Foreign Minister] Edvard
Nalbandyan meets [Turkish President] Abdulla Gul at the airport,
see how wide Serzh Sargsyan smiles and shakes hands with Gyul at the
stadium. And this is enough for Turkey to become a neighbourly state
for them. Now to be specific to your question, I should say that the
prime minister's invitation is a gesture to the international community
as well. He wants to show that the incumbent Armenian authorities
are ready to collaborate with Turkey even on this sensitive issue."





#8 Zartonk

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Posted 17 June 2009 - 10:29 PM

Pardon my paranoia, BUT the idea alone is nightmarish. I fail to see what long-term benefit comes from partial Turkish ownership of an Armenian energy project, nor do I understand the advantage of any such capitalistic venture from Turkey.


#9 gamavor

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Posted 18 June 2009 - 04:30 AM

QUOTE (Zartonk @ Jun 17 2009, 10:29 PM)
Pardon my paranoia, BUT the idea alone is nightmarish. I fail to see what long-term benefit comes from partial Turkish ownership of an Armenian energy project, nor do I understand the advantage of any such capitalistic venture from Turkey.


Why not? At least the Turks would do their best to be sure that the power plant is safe! tongue.gif And besides what difference it makes if there were the Turks or the Americans? Any "cultural" or "civilizational" difference? tongue.gif




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