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#21 Arpa

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Posted 06 October 2007 - 05:54 PM

Gamavor, we love you. But, don’t you think the above story belongs in under the subject topic of Mythology? Not any different from the legend of Noah having named Yerenan when he yelled “yerevats” and landed in Nakh-ijevan! Also remember when the “only begotten son/miatsin” descended/ejav/էջավ/ իջավ” upon “Ej-miatsin.
Yes, we know that Plutarch and others have told Hannibal’s story. Which cable channel were his exploits documented and aired? tongue.gif The only thing they don’t tell us is which airline jet did he fly on. smile.gif
Survey the map below. Let us see how an army of 60,000 (another mythical number, like te vatsoum hazar zinvorner at Avarayr) and 10,000 elephants would travel 2000 miles west from what is today Tunisia, all the way to the Gibraltar, a 1000 miles north over the Pyarennies, another 1000 miles east, over the Alps, to Rome. Mind you, the legend does not say that he crossed the Mediterranean to Sicily etc. Lest we forget that some "odars" know more Armenian history than many of us. Just like the time when this highly educated (PHD History) African American woman, who upon learning that I was Armenian, brought up the story of Hannibal and his connection to Armenia, yet she ended up the story emphasizing the fact that Hannibal was an African.
http://www.mytravelg...rranean-map.gif
Did he have elephants like the one below?
Dumbo, the flying elephant.
http://www.elephantc...lies3/dumbo.gif
To not forget the 10,000 elephants in the Battle of Avarayr.
To continue. When Hannibal did not get the help he hoped, he fled yet another 2000 miles to Armenia. Where, after a couple of days knew the geography and the military needs of his host country.??!!
In all fairness. The above is such an entertainingly titillating bedtime story, not unlike the story of Noah who, according to legend was 500 years old during the flood, and that he built an ark to accommodate two of every species, yet to this day no one has told us where he bought the lumber, home Depot or Lowe’s,and where he got the electricity for his power tools.
Do elephants fly? smile.gif
Pigs fly too! tongue.gif
http://www.communica.../flying_pig.gif
No wonder nobody takes us and our so called “history” seriously.!! msn-cry.gif

Edited by Arpa, 06 October 2007 - 06:37 PM.


#22 gamavor

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Posted 06 October 2007 - 07:21 PM

By horses I guess?! smile.gif Traveling was painful but not imposible. How do you think the Roman legions travelled all the way to Armenia? smile.gif

#23 gamavor

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Posted 06 October 2007 - 11:25 PM

The Romans have always had locally (in Syria) stationed Legions. If you browse the pages of Roman history you can find a lot of information. Here is some quote from Legio XII Fulminata:



QUOTE
By the time it was known that Vologases of Parthia was approaching with a huge army, Paetus' force was much reduced. Against better counsel, he led his understrength legions out to do battle in the open. "Then, after losing a centurion and a few soldiers he had sent in advance to reconnoiter the enemy's forces" he seems to have panicked, and ordered a hasty retreat to the camp. There he dispersed his already insufficient force in a series of outposts and detachments. The romans skirmished desultorilly, while Vologases attacked the scattered outposts in detail. Many men fought bravely against impossible odds, but the best and most courageous were the first to fall. Under such incompetent leadership and seriously short on supplies, the legions' morale shattered. Paetus pleaded with Corbulo, in Syria, to "come with all speed and save the standards and Eagles." But Corbulo moved slowly, wanting to make sure his rival, Paetus, was sufficiently discredited before he came to the rescue.
Vologases assaulted the camp vigorously, "seeking to bring them to an engagement. But the men could hardly be dragged out of their tents, and would merely defend their lives, some held back by the general's order, others by their own cowardice." Paetus, meanwhile, entered feeble negotiations with the Parthian king. He finally agreed to leave Armenia, and swore before the Eagles that Romans would never return.

The legions' humiliation was complete. Even before they withdrew, the Parthians entered the camp unopposed. They took clothes, weapons, anything that took their fancy. "The soldiers were utterly cowed and gave up everything so as not to provoke a fight." Vologases made great piles of the bodies of the slain Romans and of the arms his army had captured, as testimony to his victory. Then he turned his back, and would not look upon the shattered men of the 12th and 4th legions as they slunk away. And they left quickly, 40 miles in a single day, Tacitus tells us, leaving their wounded behind to the mercies of the enemy.
Corbulo, at last advancing to the rescue, came upon the refugees on the banks of the Euphrates. He ordered the eagles of his legions covered, so as not to witness the shame of the defeated. "His men, in true grief and pity for the lot of their comrades, could not even refrain from tears... pity alone survived, the more strongly in the inferior ranks." Later, when Corbulo led his legions back to Armenia to take revenge upon Vologases, neither Legio XII Fulminata nor Legio IV Scythica would accompany them. He judged that "from the loss of their bravest men and the panic of the remainder, (they) seemed quite unfit for battle." Both legions were sent back to Syria, in disgrace.


http://members.tripo...urn/LegXII.html

#24 Arpa

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Posted 07 October 2007 - 01:18 PM

Once again a little caution and a hefty grain of salt are in order, before we lowers our vartiks and bare our behinds.
Here is what the Britannica says;
“Plutarch, c. 46-119 AD, (i.e c.=circa= on or about). Greek philosopher and miscellaneous writer, who from the 16th c. to early 19th was among the most popular of classical authors….”
It goes on to say that, ever since then Plutarch has been treated not so much as an historian but an essayist, biographer whose main objective was to highlight the exploits of the Greeks and Romans and use them as a medium to aggrandize them, use them as models of integrity and morality to inspire the masses. In other words, and these are my words ”he was just a propagandist, not an eyewitness historian”. We will also notice that he lived some 300 years after the saga of Hannibal. (247-183 BC).
Where did he get his stories from? How? And what were his objectives?
According to Armenian sources, Khorenatsi does not mention Hannibal or his involvement in Artashat.
Why?
Had he not heard of Plutarch, did he dismiss him as an unreliably biased source?
Once again, according to Armenian historians Plutarch is viewed with a jaundiced eye, to say the least he is not known for his armenophilia.
One of many googles;
http://www.livius.or...ch/plutarch.htm



#25 gamavor

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Posted 07 October 2007 - 03:11 PM

Arpa, I agree about Plutarch. He is not very trusted in the history society even for description of events to which he was witness. The point of interest however was the transportation means and how exactly remote geographically regions have displayed certain cultural similarity. If you look at the map it takes not a very long shot to get from Italy to Armenia by the sea. Ah, the Sea! That's what Cicero exclaimed in one of his oratory, emphasizing the importance of the sea as a mean for exchanging ideas, culture and goods. Even by land, although a stretch for sure but still not impossible.

A dumbass turk one time in a different forum asked my how come Armenian have in their national cuisine mussel soup or mussel dishes, when they don’t have a sea. The scum-back didn’t know that Armenians were inhabiting the shores of three seas long before his Mongol ilk showed up in Asia Minor.


#26 Johannes

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Posted 08 October 2007 - 07:31 AM

Յարգելի Արփայ, քիչերն են, որոնք քո նման համարձակին կասկածել՝ «պատմահայրերի» աւանդած եւ ուղեղներում ամրացած պատմական «ճշմարտանք»ին: Այս անգամ եւս հիանամ Ձեր սրտի քաջութեանն ի տես...Կեցցէ՛ք:

Ճշմարիտն ասեմ. Հաննիբալի կամ կարթագենացիների պատմութիւնը լրիւ չեմ ուսումնասիրած: Ափրիկէի եւ Իբերիոյ կարթագենացիները այդ տարածքը գաղութացրած փիւնիկեցիներ են: Իսկ փիւնիկեցիք՝ քանանական ժողովուրդ են: Քանանացիներն էլ Արաբիայից եկած սեմական ժողովուրդ են (մ.թ.ա. 3000-3500?):

Պլուտարքոսը որպէս հռովմէական քաղաքացիութիւն կրող յոյն փիլիսոփայ, թերեւս պատուէր ստացած էր՝ գրելու Հռովմի կայսերական նուաճումներն արդարացնող պատմութիւն:

Այնպէս որ այժմ «չարիքի առանցք»ի մասին գրւում եւ խօսւում է, այնպէս էլ այդ ժամանակ «միջազգային ընտանիքի» եւ «ազատ աշխարհ»ի ներկայացուցիչ՝ «հանրապետական» Հռոմը միսիոն (առաքելութիւն) ունէր հանրապետական եւ ժողովրդավարական կարգերը տարածելու աշխարհին:

Եթէ կարթագենցի Հաննիբալը Արմենիայի արքա Արտաշէսի բարեկամն ու դաշնակիցն է, ապա պէտք է նուաճել այդ երկիրը: Նրանք չկարողացան նուաճել Արմենիան, սակայն նուազեցրին Արմենիայի ռազմական եւ աշխարհագրական կշիռը միջին արեւելքում: Դա տեղի ունեցաւ Տիգրան Մեծ Արտաշէսեանի ժամանակ:

Այժմէական զուգահեռ կարելի է գտնել նաեւ Իրանի առնչութեամբ: Ա.Մ.Ն. ուժեղ մրցակից է տեսնում Իրանին, վերջինիս միջին արեւելեան աշխոյժ քաղաքական գործունէութեան պատճառով: Պատրուակներ կարելի է գտնել փաթաթելու Իրանի իրանին, իւրանիումի հարստացումից մինչ եւ հանրապետական բանակի ահաբեկչութիւնը...:

Նկատում եմ ափրիկեան ծագումով որոշ բեմադրիչներ ցանկան երեւիլ հիւսիս ափրիկեան հին քաղաքակրթութեան ժառանգորդը, կրողը: Մեղմ ասած՝ այդպէս չէ: Հարաւ եւ կենտրոնական Ափրիկէից ամերիկաներ ուղարկուած սեւամորթ ստրուկները չէին, եւ չեն Եգիպտոսի եւ մնացեալ հիւսիս ապրիկեան ցեղային եւ քաղաքրկթական ժառանգութեան կրողները: Սա չի նշանակում, որ անտեսում եմ նրանց, երբէ՛ք: Հնագիտանքը արձանագրում է Ուգանդայում եւ այլուր մշակոյթ կերտած մաքուր նեգրոիդների մասին, բայց յանուն արդարութեան, ուզեցի տրանջատել հիւսիս Ափրիկէն հարաւ եւ կետրոն Ափրիկէից: Իմ կարծիքով նրանք իրարից շատ աւելի հեռու են, քան այդ հեռաւորութիւնը որ կայ, հիւսիս Եւրոպայի եւ միջերկրականեան եւրոպայի միջեւ:

Նեգրոիտների ցեղային ինքնագիտակցումը եւ պաշտպանումը երբեմն հասնում է չափազավնցումի, այնպէս որ կնամեծարանքի (ֆեմինիզմ) կիրառման մէջ երբեմն չափազանցում ենք:

Վկայ եղայ հարիւրաւոր այրերի հերթի սպասմանը, մինչ հինգ-վեց կին ստանում էին կառք վարելու իրենց վկայականը. առանց հերթի եւ վարչակալական (բիւրոկրատական) քաղքշուկի: Այո՛, հետամնաց եւ երրորդ աշխարհի մաս համարւող բնակած երկրումս, կանայք առաջին կարգի քաղաքացիներ են, առնուազն հերթում:



#27 Arpa

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Posted 08 October 2007 - 09:29 AM

QUOTE(Johannes @ Oct 8 2007, 01:31 PM)
Յարգելի Արփայ, քիչերն են, որոնք քո նման համարձակին կասկածել՝ «պատմահայրերի» աւանդած եւ ուղեղներում ամրացած պատմական «ճշմարտանք»ին: Այս անգամ եւս հիանամ Ձեր սրտի քաջութեանն ի տես...Կեցցէ՛ք:

Ճշմարիտն ասեմ. Հաննիբալի կամ կարթագենացիների պատմութիւնը լրիւ չեմ ուսումնասիրած: Ափրիկէի եւ Իբերիոյ կարթագենացիները այդ տարածքը գաղութացրած փիւնիկեցիներ են: Իսկ փիւնիկեցիք՝ քանանական ժողովուրդ են: Քանանացիներն էլ Արաբիայից եկած սեմական ժողովուրդ են (մ.թ.ա. 3000-3500?):

Whyis Kanan/Kanaan is still a popular surname of some Syrians, Lebanese/Paletinianis?
Ohannes, look here, Canaanites and Phoenicians;
http://hyeforum.com/...mp;#entry117787
When I was only 8 years old , when our Sunday School teachers would tell us stories abot David and Goliath, Samson (Phoenician, Canaanite, ՜Փղշտացի/Palestinian, Gazan) and others idiots, I could not help but see pictures of Mickey Mouse, Donald Duck and other cartoons.
And now. Let us talk about that other “mickey mouse” aka Korenatsi whose main mission was to hebradize/christianize?) our history, mythology and ancestry.
And now, the entire world believes , specifically us, the Armenians that we are descendants of that idiot Noah, and that the Canaanites, the Phoenicians, the Philistines, the Palestinians, and eventually the Carthaginians were an anathema.
That Book of Lies is assumed to be the most read . Can I have my say? Can we burn all those “books” (the so called Old Testament, not the New) and use them as a source of heat for freezing homes in Hayastan?
If only I had my way, I would declare Khorenatsi the traitor of all times, who, in his fervor of an agent of that newfangled religion trashed our history in favor of thoae idiots of Abraham and David, either of which has yet to be historically and archeologically proven.

Edited by Arpa, 08 October 2007 - 09:44 AM.


#28 Arpa

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Posted 06 December 2007 - 05:47 PM

Guess who???

http://www.reporter....dfs/B1201-E.pdf\

1. Preserve medieval monuments by not restoring them, a historian says

* Steven Sim is creator of "Virtual Ani"

* Gives two talks in New York

by Anoush Ter Taulian

NEW YORK -- On November 15, Scottish architectural historian Steven
Sim presented a slide show and lecture about the remnants of the
Armenian cultural heritage in Turkey, at the Diocesan Center in New
York. The speech -- one of two Mr. Sim gave in New York (see the
sidebar story) -- was an adjunct event of the "Armenian Monuments of
the Nakhichevan Region" exhibition, which was concurrently on display
at Harvard University.

Mr. Sim's presentation showed how one dedicated individual can make
an important contribution to preserving that cultural heritage. His
search for the monuments of historic Armenia has taken him, alone,
into some remote and inhospitable parts of what is now Turkey and
Azerbaijan.

His study of Armenian monuments had been ongoing for nine years
before Mr. Sim ever set foot in present-day Armenia.

Anahit Ter-Stepanian, an adjunct art professor at Sacred Heart
University in Connecticut, who organized the November 15 event in
conjunction with the Diocese's Krikor and Clara Zohrab Information
Center, described "Sim's first encounter with Armenian buildings...
when he was traveling around Turkey in 1984. He has visited Turkey
every year since 1989, taking over 20,000 photographs, while exploring
and documenting the region's surviving Armenian monuments. In 1999 he
created a website on Armenian architecture, www.virtualani.org, which
receives worldwide inquiries."

Ms. Ter-Stepanian continued her introduction by noting that the
Yerevan-based organization, Research on Armenian Architecture,
sponsored Mr. Sim's 2005 trip to Nakhichevan to document the
conditions of the region's Armenian churches. Mr. Sim also supplied
testimony in 2006 to Charles Tannock, a member of the European
Parliament, that led to the passing of a European Union resolution
condemning Azerbaijan's destruction of the khatchkars in Julfa. He was
invited by Switzerland's Armenia Parliamentary Group to be a part of a
delegation that met with UNESCO to protest the inactivity regarding
the destruction of the Julfa Armenian graveyard.

In his presentation, Mr. Sim first discussed the Turkish government's
recent restoration of the Church of the Holy Cross at Aghtamar. He
questioned the quality of the reconstruction and showed how it did not
maintain the integrity of the original church. For instance, instead
of using the original type of lime cement, the restorers used ordinary
cement, which is not long lasting and must be replaced in three to ten
years. The Turkish team also made fundamental changes that are
contrary to the ethics of restoration, according to Mr. Sim; he gave
as an example the stripping away of the original earthen roof and
replacing it with a pitched stone roof.

Mr. Sim's slides of last spring's Aghtamar re-opening showed scenes
now familiar to many Armenians: the gigantic red Turkish flag draped
on the front of the church; the thousands of Turkish-flag balloons
that were released at the ribbon-cutting; a large sign reading,
"Respect the History, Respect the Culture" -- even though the church
was being presented as a museum, and is not allowed to function as an
Armenian church.

Commenting on what he termed a botched restoration, with a low level
of workmanship and lack of understanding of Armenian architecture, Mr.
Sim said: "If you can't preserve the original aspect of the building
after restoration, then it should not be restored."

He added: "Artifacts [like pottery or carved stone fragments] that
were uncovered during the restoration have just been left lying
around, to be lost or stolen; they should be preserved in a museum."

* Painstaking documentation

According to the last official list of Armenian buildings made by the
Armenian Patriarchate in Istanbul in 1911, there were over 1,639
parish churches, 700 monastic churches, and 210 monasteries in the
Ottoman Empire. The Patriarchate's figures did not include the
hundreds of other Armenian Protestant and Catholic churches throughout
Ottoman Turkey.

Mr. Sim has painstakingly documented the ongoing destruction of many
of these Armenian monuments. On Ktutz Island in Lake Van stands a
14th-century church, St. Hovannes, which has been vandalized by Turks
who have scribbled their names on the walls. Near Ani there used to be
five churches in the 10th-century Khtzkonk monastery, but in the early
1960s soldiers from the local Turkish army base used dynamite to blow
up the churches; only one survives today. Local vandals routinely tear
up church floors searching for gold allegedly buried by the former
Armenian inhabitants.

Ironically, some churches that have been used as barns, mosques,
gymnasia, or storage facilities have been better preserved. Mr. Sim
told how the Church of the Apostles in Kars was used as a warehouse
for petroleum in the 1930s. (It is now used as a mosque.) The
16th-century Phirus Church near Lake Van is now a mosque -- even
though Armenian churches typically face east, and mosques in the
region face south.

Mr. Sim has also visited monuments in more remote locations which are
better preserved. Near the village of Terjan stand a pair of
six-meter-tall, 12th-century khatchkars -- remarkably still standing.
In Hayots Dzor -- the "Valley of the Armenians," home to the fortress
of the legendary Haik -- there still stands the 17th-century nunnery
of St. Marina, once a popular pilgrimage site dedicated to a young
woman who lived a clandestine existence as a male monk.

Nevertheless, "It is distressing to return each year and see less and
less," Mr. Sim lamented. "These monuments have no future without
conservation. The seventh-century Church of Mren, the oldest surviving
example of an Armenian domed church, is in a border military zone and
officially people are not allowed to go there. It has a large crack
and is severely damaged, and will collapse completely unless urgent
repairs are done," he said.

* Policies of neglect

"The Turkish government has a policy of neglect," Mr. Sim said, adding
surprisingly, "and Armenian organizations have the same policy of
neglect." He said he considered it "unrealistic" to hope that these
Armenian monuments might be reclaimed by the Armenian Church, and
advised Armenians to give money to the Turks who own these buildings
to encourage their ongoing maintenance.

Equally surprising, Mr. Sim said he thinks the monuments should not
be rebuilt, because the monuments themselves are also "Genocide
survivors" which should be preserved as they are, so as not to destroy
the evidence of the Genocide. (It would also be contrary to current
conservation practices to completely rebuild the buildings, he said.)

"There are still a lot of Armenian village churches, graveyards, and
castles to discover," Mr. Sim said. "It is a race against time. Some
Armenian with financial resources should try to preserve a few
churches to set an example. For $100,000, five or six ancient churches
could be saved. Now there is massive urban development [in Turkey] and
there is little of Armenian origin left; most Turkish cities contain
few buildings that are older than 50 years of age, regardless of how
ancient those cities are. After the founding of the Turkish republic,
Turkey undertook a relentless drive to modernity, and because of this
most people in Turkey do not see any value in preserving old things.
Armenians must act fast, because within 30 years there will be few
monuments left to save."

In a question-and answer-session at the end of the presentation,
members of the Armenian community expressed different views on what
could be done to preserve the monuments.

Rachel Goshgarian, director of the Krikor and Clara Zorab Center,
suggested that the Land and Culture Organization, which had
established building programs in Armenia and Artsakh, could start a
similar project in Turkey. She encouraged every Armenian to contribute
to the upkeep of the monuments.

Mr. Ter-Stepanian noted, "The Armenian community is in a very
difficult psychological and emotional state. Is the need to preserve
the Armenian cultural heritage a part of our values? What kind of
support do we give Armenian scholars and researchers?"

Hrand Markarian, who wrote a book about historical Western Armenia,
Liturgy: Sound of Stones, said the monuments were confiscated under a
Turkish law that declared them abandoned property, in defiance of the
fact that they belonged to the Armenian Patriarchate in Istanbul; he
said they were never abandoned and should therefore be returned. He
also questioned the decision of the Turkish government not to allow
Armenian architects to work on the restoration of Aghtamar, but added
resignedly: "It is not easy to get through the legal quagmire of
Turkish laws designed to prevent Armenian ownership of Armenian
properties."

Mr. Sim replied to this point that an argument about abandonment
versus confiscation has no bearing on how to preserve the monuments;
that most of the surviving disused churches are in private ownership;
and that it was "a fantasy to ever expect them to be returned to the
Armenian Church." He added that the preservation of churches "would be
a threat if the current owners in Turkey believed that there was a
possibility their property would be confiscated and given back to
Armenians." The result would be to accelerate the destruction of such
monuments.

In a brief post-lecture interview, historian Aram Arkun, a specialist
in the Genocide period, said, "Saving these Armenian monuments is a
complex issue because Armenians don't have free access to their
buildings, and Armenians who visit them are treated with suspicion.
There are so many of them that the cost of renovation would be very
expensive, especially when the border between Turkey and Armenia is
closed. Certainly, better Turkish-Armenian relations would help. But
UNESCO is not actively helping, and the likelihood is that many of
these monuments will disappear."

He added: "Ultimately, one of the potential components of reparations
demands for the Armenian Genocide -- if Armenians are ever in a
position to make them -- would be the return and restoration of these
monuments."



Edited by Arpa, 06 December 2007 - 05:54 PM.


#29 Aratta-Kingdom

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Posted 11 April 2008 - 10:30 AM

http://www.huliq.com...menian-karahunj


Stonehenge England is 3,500 Years Younger than Armenian Karahunj



Tourists familiar with Scottish heritage would be astonished to discover the possibility of famous Stonehenge been originated in Armenia, claiming the fact that the Armenian land is the real cradle of civilization.

Famous professor and world’s known specialist on stone monuments Gerald. S. Hawkins had acknowledged that Karahunj is 7,500 years old, which means that it is 3,500 years older than Scotland Stonehenge, older than Karnak in France and Newgrenge in Ireland. It may prove what some people already suspect that Armenia is the cradle of the civilization.

On the territory of 7 hectares, 223 huge vertical stones like soldiers stand on the hill, some with holes pierced in them. The rough- cut stones aligned irregularly for a purpose, 84 were found to have holes. Many unique astronomic instruments consisting of one, two or three Stones were identified and using these, many observations of the Sun, Moon and stars. It is commonly assumed to be an early observatory, the evidence of ancient astronomical culture in Armenia. These stones have been attributed with mystical and cosmic powers. The Armenian scientists in ancient times could accurately measure latitude, knew that the Earth was ball-shaped, had an accurate calendar, and many more.

The sight is beautiful and ancient, well worth the visit. Astronomers from Europe and the US are showing increasing interest in the complex, and several expeditions have already taken place. To compare Armenian Karahunj with Scottish Stonehenge visit Welcomearmenia.com for its unique images. For experience you can take guided tours to the ancient sophisticated observatory of Karahunj with 7Days... Armenian Travel Company. Multi-language guides will describe and explain the mystical meanings of the Armenian Zorats Karer, the oldest observatory of the world.



#30 Ashot

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Posted 12 April 2008 - 05:30 AM

Զորաց Քարեր (Քարահունջ)


Սյունիքի մարզում, Սիսիան քաղաքի մոտակայքում է գտնվում աշխարհի հնագույն մեգալիթյան կոթողային համալիրներից մեկը` Զորաց Քարերը: Դեռ հեռվից նկատելի են հարթավայրում տեղադրված կարմրավուն հսկայական մոնոլիտների շարքերը, որոնք ձգվում են հարավից հյուսիս, իսկ այդ շարքերով սահմանափակված տարածքի ներսում կազմում են ճշգրիտ շրջանագիծ:

Ապացուցված է, որ Զորաց Քարեր համալիրը կառուցվել է մ.թ.ա. VI հազարամյակում և ծառայել է որպես աստղադիտարան: Կոթողներից շատերում արված են անցքեր, որոնք ճշգրտորեն համապատասխանում են երկնքում աստղերի դասավորվածությանը այդ դարաշրջանում:

Գիտնականները հայտնաբերել են նմանատիպ կառույցներ նաև Եվրոպայում: Դրանցից ամենանշանավորն է` Ստոնհենջը (մ.թ.ա. II հազ.):




#31 Zartonk

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Posted 27 May 2008 - 02:28 PM

Embers of the Sun: A Journey through Megalithic Armenia

Part 1

Part 2



#32 Zartonk

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Posted 27 May 2008 - 02:58 PM

Karahunj Video

Karahunj Video 2

#33 Arpa

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Posted 27 May 2008 - 04:28 PM

Did you know that there is a Village of Karahunj in Artsakh too? I didn’t.

http://www.armsite.com/maps/
http://www.armsite.c...hen=now&slide=8
In the meantime ;
QUOTE
'ARMENIA'S STONEHENGE' OPENS AS TOURIST SITE

RIA Novosti
May 26 2008
Russia

YEREVAN, May 26 (RIA Novosti) - Authorities in southern Armenia have
opened a 5,000-year-old prehistoric monument dubbed "the Armenian
Stonehenge," but known locally as Carahunge, as a tourist site.

The monument, located some 200 km (124 miles) away from the capital,
Yerevan, consists of over 200 shaped stones, some bearing smooth angled
holes of 4 to 5cm in diameter, directed at different points at the sky.

"This territory will be developed for tourism," said Samvel Musoyan,
deputy chief of the Armenian culture ministry's department for
cultural heritage.

Funding has already been raised from the country's budget to develop
the tourist site, build a transparent wall around the monument and
for maintenance and security of the site.

Following excavation of the site, it is believed to have served
simultaneously as a temple of Ari, the ancient Armenian deity
of the sun, a university and an observatory. According to recent
archaeological findings, the site could be used to define the precise
name of sunrise and lunar phases and the day when a year began.

The fact that chips of transparent obsidian glass were found at the
site spawned the theory that the pre-historic dwellers, that inhabited
the region, placed them inside the holes for magnification.

Though some scientists believe that Carahunge was built some five
thousand years ago, Armenian scientists argue that it is 7,500
years old.

The more famous Stonehenge site located in the county of Wiltshire
in southwest England is at least 5,000 years old and was declared a
UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1996.

The structure comprises standing stones, believed to date back to
2200 B.C. which are surrounded by a circular earth mound and ditch
constructed some 1000 years earlier. Its original purpose is unclear,
but it is believed to have been used as a temple or an observatory.






#34 Ashot

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Posted 12 June 2008 - 03:03 PM

ANCIENT CONSTRUCTION DISCOVERED

[06:37 pm] 12 June, 2008

Residents of Koti Village, Tavush Region accidentally discovered an ancient construction which is likely to have been a pagan or pre-Christian temple. As Governor of the village Felix Melikyan states it is more than 8 meters in length.

Local residents were afraid to dig it out as they might damage the monument. The Governor has addressed to the Armenian Institute of Archeology with the request to carry out excavations at the site.

The archeologists are expected to arrive at Koti village on June 15.


“Kamut” TV

Noyemberyan


#35 Aratta-Kingdom

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 08:49 PM



http://www.pr-inside...rld-r644701.htm


PR-inside.com
Travel & Leisure
2008-06-16



Stonehenge England is 3,500 Years Younger than Armenian Karahunj



The oldest Stonehenge in the World !!!! Armenia or England???


Tourists familiar with Scottish heritage would be astonished to discover the possibility of famous Stonehenge been originated in Armenia, claiming the fact that the Armenian land is the real cradle of civilization.


Famous professor and world's known specialist on stone monuments Gerald. S. Hawkins had acknowledged that Karahunj is 7,500 years old, which means that it is 3,500 years older than Scotland Stonehenge, older than Karnak in France and Newgrenge in Ireland. It may prove what some people already suspect that Armenia
is the cradle of the civilization.

On the territory of 7
hectares, 223 huge vertical stones like soldiers stand on the hill,
some with holes pierced in them. The rough- cut stones aligned irregularly for a purpose, 84 were found to have holes. Many unique astronomic instruments consisting of one, two or three Stones were identified and using these, many observations of the Sun, Moon and stars. It is commonly assumed to be an early observatory, the evidence of ancient astronomical culture in Armenia. These stones have been attributed with mystical and cosmic powers. The Armenian scientists in ancient times could accurately measure latitude, knew that the Earth was ball-shaped, had an accurate calendar, and many more.

The sight is beautiful and ancient, well worth the visit. Astronomers from Europe and the US are showing increasing interest in the complex, and several expeditions have already taken place. To compare Armenian Karahunj with Scottish Stonehenge visit Welcomearmenia.com for its unique images. For experience you can take guided tours to the ancient sophisticated observatory of Karahunj with 7Days... Armenian Travel Company. Multi-language guides will describe and explain the mystical meanings of the Armenian Zorats Karer, the oldest observatory of the world.

#36 Sip

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 10:46 PM



Carhenge, Nebraska.



Edited by Sip, 16 June 2008 - 10:47 PM.


#37 Arpa

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Posted 18 June 2008 - 10:19 AM

tongue.gif Hi Sip! You, stonehead! oops.gif I mean cheesehead. smile.gif
All of those "henges" are from the STONE AGE. Maybe Iron age smile.gif
Are we going in a full circle around, in this 21st century? Going back to the STONE AGE, better known as "SILICON"??? tongue.gif biggrin.gif smile.gif

Edited by Arpa, 18 June 2008 - 06:19 PM.


#38 Zartonk

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Posted 18 June 2008 - 05:59 PM

That is really cool

#39 MosJan

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Posted 15 July 2008 - 10:46 AM

DIGGINGS WILL CONTINUE IN CASE OF FINANCIAL SUPPORT


  • As a result of three weeks' diggings in the frontier Village of Koti associate member of the RA National Academy of Sciences (NAS), archeologist Aram Kalantarian and head of the archeology and ethnography institute of NAS, Ph.D. Suren Hobossian have discovered several churches and khachkars (stone-crosses) dating back to 6-7c., 12-13c. and 16-17c.

    The diggings, performed with private funds, are presently discontinued. They will continue next year, when the Government invests funds from the State Budget.

    "Kamut" TV

    Noyemberyan


#40 Arpa

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Posted 17 September 2008 - 07:53 AM

http://hyeforum.com/...p;hl=archeology
ԹՄԲԿԱԲԵՐԴ TMBKABERD
Թմբուկ Բերդ**
** Թումբ means “mound”/ հողակոյտ, as in "dam" against water: Does it sound like the English “tomb, pr. toomb” to mean “ceremonial burial place/monument” like the Armenian “շիրիմ”?
More info and pictues needed!
How about it SAS?
See how, at times it is written as (Georgian? Vratseren?)“TmogvԹմոգվ/Tmovg Թմովգ”. Is it because some may have read the Ւ of ՈՒ as Վ, the "hyun" U as V?
Also see;
http://hyeforum.com/...showtopic=18670
QUOTE
ՋԱՎԱԽՔԸ ԸՍՏ «ԱՇԽԱՐՀԱՑՈՅՑԻ»
Մեծ Հայքի Գուգարք նահանգի Ջավախք գավառն ուրարտական արձանագրություններում հիշատակվում է Զաբախա ձեւով: Հայ պատմիչները Ջավախքի բնակավայրերից հիշատակում են Սկուտրի, Դլիվեկն ու Խոզաբիր գյուղերը: Վերին Ջավախքի հնագույն կենտրոնն է եղել Քաջատուն քաղաքը, որը կոչվել է նաեւ Ծունդա: Միջին դարերում նշանավոր է դարձել Թմոգվի (Թմկաբերդ) բերդաքաղաքը, որը 12-14-րդ դդ. Զաքարյանների հայ իշխանական տան Երկայնաբազուկ (Մխարգձելի)-Թմոգվելի ճյուղի իշխանանիստն էր: Զրեսկի վանքը (համանուն լճի մոտ) եղել է հայադավանության կենտրոն, պայքարել գավառի հայերի մեջ քաղկեդոնականության տարածման դեմ: 9-10-րդ դդ. վերելք է ապրել Ախալքալաքը (Նոր քաղաք), որը 11-րդ դարում պարսպատվել է եւ, որպես վարչական կենտրոն, փոխարինել Ծունդային: Վրաստանը Ռուսաստանին միանալուց (1801) եւ հատկապես Ադրիանուպոլսի 1829-ի հաշտության պայմանագրից հետո Էրզրումի եւ նրա շրջակայքի հայերը զանգվածաբար գաղթել են Ջավախք, իսկ տեղի հայ բնակչությունը տեղափոխվել է Քարթլիի կենտրոնական գավառները: Այսօր Ախալքալաքի եւ Նինոծմինդայի (Բոգդանովկայի) շրջաններում տեղաբնակների եւ գաղթականների սերունդներն են ապրում:
ՍԵՐԳԵՅ ԳԱԼՈՅԱՆ

http://www.raa.am/Ja...mkaberd_1_E.htm
http://travel.javakh..._monuments.html

Edited by Arpa, 17 September 2008 - 08:05 AM.





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