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#1 MosJan

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Posted 22 December 2008 - 01:38 AM



Fifty-one™ is the new generation of electronic cigarettes.
Best solution to smoking bans with no second hand smoking and other dangers of cigarette smoking.
Better than any other electric cigarette on the market. Go to www.smoke51.com to compare it to other e-cigarettes.

http://video.aol.com/video-detail/electron...cid=VIDURVENT12


a friend just recommended this to me, to help quit smoking

has anyone ever used one ??

#2 Anoushik

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Posted 22 December 2008 - 01:46 AM

Actually yes, I have tongue.gif

#3 MosJan

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Posted 22 December 2008 - 01:51 AM



#4 MosJan

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Posted 22 December 2008 - 01:51 AM

E cigar ??



#5 nairi

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Posted 23 December 2008 - 05:14 AM

Cold turkey, education, solid reasons, and lots and lots of patience are the only way to quit and stay quit. (Says I, who has now officially been smoke-free for 6 months, 10 days, and counting).

Edited by nairi, 23 December 2008 - 05:16 AM.


#6 MosJan

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Posted 23 December 2008 - 01:04 PM

QUOTE (nairi @ Dec 23 2008, 03:14 AM)
Cold turkey, education, solid reasons, and lots and lots of patience are the only way to quit and stay quit. (Says I, who has now officially been smoke-free for 6 months, 10 days, and counting).


congratulations !!!

Cold turkey - OK
Education - OK
Moral Support - OK
Friends and family supporting - OK

patience - sad.gif No OK sad.gif

#7 nairi

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Posted 23 December 2008 - 06:40 PM

You're doomed. sad.gif

#8 ED

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Posted 23 December 2008 - 08:58 PM

I can honestly say I never been a chain smoker, 5 at most, today i had 2 so far and most likely I'll have another before bed, with regular excersize and eating habits i dont worry much
last week i had my cheast x-rayed and was in good shape
there can be 2 or more reason why people smoke 2 or 3 packs a day, addiction and most important stress is the main couse+ and not the list being Armenian wink.gif can contribute to addiction
I'm addicted to work....work and work, to much stress in life so forth.........yesterday my son told me i miss you dad, come and think of it i miss my self
@ 2009 i plan to change for better, travel lot, spend time with my family and friends, maybe get a 4x4 like Sip and drive up to mountains, keep my mind busy, on the go, mind, which has been in fixation for long time is my worst enamy, got to change!

#9 gamavor

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Posted 27 April 2012 - 04:26 AM

It helped me quit smoking cigarettes. Unbelievable but true. I used the electronic cigarette for two months and then I dropped it too. Switched to cigars and only one particular type. Honestly I feel much fit and healthy thereafter.

#10 Yervant1

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Posted 27 April 2012 - 12:55 PM

Send me few boxes of those cigars and I'll let you know if they are any good. :P :D

#11 MosJan

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Posted 02 August 2013 - 05:11 PM

It helped me quit smoking cigarettes. Unbelievable but true. I used the electronic cigarette for two months and then I dropped it too. Switched to cigars and only one particular type. Honestly I feel much fit and healthy thereafter.

So how are you doing now ?



#12 MosJan

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Posted 02 August 2013 - 05:12 PM

Inhalation technique with an e-cigarette
Virtually all newcomers to electronic cigarettes are ex-smokers [1], so it is natural for them to try to use an e-cigarette in the same way as a tobacco cigarette, especially as the first model chosen may be a replica of a cigarette.

Unfortunately this doesn't work well, as the two things may look similar but are functionally very different. One is a paper tube where the smoke resulting from burning chopped-up vegetable matter is inhaled; the other is a steel tube producing a water-based vapor from a liquid that is vaporized by a battery and heater element - essentially, a low-temperature steam. One contains tobacco that is set on fire at high temperature; the other has no tobacco and generates mist using a battery. There aren't really any valid comparisons between the two.

If an ecig is used like a cigarette, it doesn't work, and there might be other issues too, such as a sore throat or lungs. An ecig doesn't contain any tobacco; there is no combustion; nothing is ignited; there is no smoke; the process is low-temperature within a mist-laden atmosphere. Multiple clinical trials have demonstrated that if an ecig is used in the same way as a tobacco cigarette, either zero or very little nicotine can be measured in the user's bloodstream.

So now that we know it must be used differently, the question is: how? The short answer is that the only similarity is that both are placed in the mouth. After that, everything else is different.

1. E-Cigarette vapor is not drawn directly into the lungs, as many smokers do with a tobacco cigarette. The lungs do not 'suck' on the ecig; a direct inhale is not used. Instead, the vapor is first drawn into the mouth, using the cheeks to create a vacuum, then inhaled if desired.

The vapor doesn't have to be inhaled though, and an ecig can be used like a cigar, with the vapor only taken into the mouth. Nicotine will still be delivered - and probably better than if an attempt is made to inhale the vapor directly into the lungs.

2. First the vapor is drawn into the mouth, then held there for a second or two. Then, it can be inhaled if desired. The vapor is then expelled through the mouth or nose.

3. The vapor is drawn very slowly and gently into the mouth (not the lungs). A hard pull, as is normal with a cigarette, cannot be used since:
a. The heater coil doesn't work properly unless air is drawn across it gently for several seconds. There won't be any nicotine in the vapor if a short hard pull is used.
b. It may pull liquid into the mouth.

4. E-Cigarette vapor is a water-based mist and not smoke. This has two main consequences:
a. The droplet size in vapor is ten times the particulate size in smoke (10 microns vs 1 micron). This means that cigarette smoke penetrates far more deeply into the lungs, travelling deep into the smallest passageways. Vapor cannot go anywhere near as deep, and this means that nicotine is not available so easily from the lungs, and is obtained more slowly.
b. It is likely that just as much nicotine is absorbed by the mucous membranes in the mouth and nose as within the lungs. In fact for maximum nicotine delivery, all three need to be employed: mouth, lungs, nose - otherwise all the nicotine cannot be delivered.

5. Indeed it is not necessary to inhale, when using an e-cigarette, to obtain nicotine: holding the vapor in the mouth will suffice for some people (especially with high-strength liquid), and expelling some through the nose as well, after a very shallow inhale, will add to the nic delivery. Persons with serious lung diseases caused by smoking, such as emphysema, can take advantage of this - since inhaling anything further, even mist, is absolutely not advised.

Nicotine delivery via cigarette smoke is unusually rapid - it reaches the brain in around 8 seconds, which is at least three times faster than injecting nicotine, which takes up to 30 seconds to reach the brain. This is part of the grip cigarettes have, since this ultra-fast delivery becomes associated with the act of smoking.

Nevertheless, a properly set up e-cigarette, with a sufficiently strong liquid for the equipment and user, used correctly after advice from an expert, will deliver nicotine in about 30 seconds. After a period of adapting to the new delivery method, this has proven acceptable to smokers switching to the ecig.

6. Lastly, an 'inhale' on an ecig (which as we have seen above is nothing of the sort, it's more of a 'suck') is much, much longer than with a cigarette. There is only somewhere between 10% and 50% of the nicotine in ecig vapor compared to cigarette smoke, so more vapor needs to be taken in, and for a longer time session - probably about 12 minutes as against the 5 minutes a cigarette lasts. Also, the atomizer simply doesn't work if a 2-second inhale is used, since for at least the first second it is warming up and does absolutely nothing.

With a small ecig we draw into the mouth for between 4 seconds and 8 seconds (yes, 8 seconds), depending on how efficient the device is, how strong the liquid refill is, and how expert the user is; the average draw length is 4 or 5 seconds. This would be used with a mini ecig, for example. As you can see, a slow and gentle 'suck' of 5 seconds bears no relation at all to the sharp, hard lung inhale of 1 or 2 seconds used with a cigarette.

With a larger and more efficient ecig we might use a 3 or 4 second draw. We don't use a direct lung inhale or a 2-second draw with any ecig, except by personal preference, for occasional variation. Neither works: a lung inhale doesn't get enough nicotine and causes soreness and coughing, and a 2-second cigarette-style draw is basically a placebo operation as the atomizer won't be doing much.


Results of incorrect use
As we can see, incorrect use doesn't work and has issues: little or no nicotine will be delivered; coughing or irritation to the throat or lungs may result. An e-cigarette cannot be used like a tobacco cigarette for multiple reasons. Tobacco smoke contains materials that are engineered to have an anaesthetic effect on the throat and lungs, but e-cigarette mist does not have these compounds.

There are probably more clinical studies carried out and published where the researchers didn't have a clue how to use an ecig than studies performed correctly with advice from an expert. We can easily see this in results that include reports such as 'zero nicotine was delivered' or 'the lungs were affected'. It is a little worrying to see such results since it brings into question the results of other studies: if clinical researchers are demonstrably so incompetent, could other results they obtain also be wildly inaccurate?


They're different
Always use your ecig in a different way to a cigarette (apart from them both going in the mouth). If you find yourself doing something - anything - the same, it's probably wrong and certainly suboptimal.


Definitely to be avoided
Try not to apply a lighter to the end of your e-cigarette.
Don't try to flick ash off the end, you'll look stupid.
Do not throw your ecig out of the car window after finishing with it.
http://www.e-cigaret...-cigarette.html


#13 MosJan

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Posted 02 August 2013 - 05:14 PM

http://www.cbc.ca/pl.../ID/2392350889/



#14 MosJan

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Posted 02 August 2013 - 05:22 PM

In the past decade, big tobacco has finally developed and marketed a cigarette* that does not cause cancer**.

It's the closest we've come to a cancer-free cigarette, which tobacco companies have been fantasizing about since the 1950s.

But there are a few catches.

 *First, they are arguably not even cigarettes, without the tobacco content or taste that the 1.1 billion global smokers enjoy. That's the primary reason why e-cigarettes still represent only a tiny share of the market.

**Second, while e-cigarettes probably won't give you cancer, they may still contribute to heart disease, heart attack, stroke, and other ailments. Ultimately we know very little about the health effects — and given the history of cigarettes, that should worry you.

Cancer-free?

People smoke e-cigarettes to get a nicotine high, similar to the kind one gets with traditional cigarettes.

While the nicotine in e-cigarettes comes from the tobacco plant, it is separated from tar and other plant material that cause cancer when smoked.

Because there hasn't been any research into the long-term effects of inhaling nicotine vapor from an e-cigarette, we can't say for sure that they don't cause cancer. What we can say is that the e-cigarettes are most likely healthier than tobacco cigarettes because they lack the 4,000 plus chemicals from the tobacco leaves.

E-cigarettes hold nicotine in liquid form, which gets heated into a vapor and released when a user sucks on the end.

e%20cigarette%20diagram.jpg

EonSmokes

That nicotine high

The stimulating effects of nicotine are immediate.

It makes its way through the mucus membranes of your lungs and into your bloodstream, then into your brain. When it hits your brain, nicotine binds to brain cells that turn on the body’s "wake-up call" pathways. It also releases dopamine, our "feel good" brain chemical, and glutamate, which is involved in learning and memory, reinforcing this good feeling and making your memory of it stronger.

In about an hour, half of the nicotine from that smoke is already broken down and expelled from your body, leaving you craving more.

Regular nicotine users develop a tolerance to the drug, making them use more and more, for example, moving from a cigarette a day to a few packs per week. The same thing can happen with inhaled nicotine.

It can still kill you

E-cigarettes may not cause cancer, but that doesn't make them safe.

Nicotine on its own is an extremely toxic poison similar to pesticides. When you take too much, you can get nicotine poisoning, which causes vomiting and nausea, and headaches.  

Even in smaller doses it can be dangerous. When you take in nicotine, your body releases adrenaline — giving you a sudden rush of energy and increasing your heartbeat, blood pressure, and breathing. It also tells your body to pump your blood with sugars. Because of these effects, nicotine use is linked to heart disease, heart attack, and stroke.

A small study, presented at the European Respiratory Society’s annual meeting in February 2012 showed that e-cigarette smoking could have negative effects on people with coronary artery disease who have plaques in their arteries, because it lowers blood oxygen levels after 10 minutes of e-cigarette use. The researchers, from the University of Athens in Greece, suggested that people with these health issues should use other nicotine products to quit smoking.

Another small 2012 study published in the journal Chest also showed changes in lung functioning after use of e-cigarettes.

When asked about the Greek study, Klaus Lessnau, a lung doctor at Lennox Hill Hospital in New York City, told Robert Glatter of Forbes that "electronic cigarettes cannot be recommended to improve lung health, but there is certainly some degree of harm reduction compared to regular cigarette use," because of the presence of fewer toxic and tar-based substances.

More research needed

A 2010 study published in the journal Tobacco Control suggested the five major e-cigarette brands had design flaws, lack of adequate labeling, and potential quality control issues.

The study was led by University of California, Riverside researcher Prue Talbot, who said at the time, "there are virtually no scientific studies on e-cigarettes and their safety. Our study – one of the first studies to evaluate e-cigarettes – shows that this product has many flaws, which could cause serious public health problems in the future if the flaws go uncorrected."

As she noted, the health effects of nicotine, which is addictive, haven’t been adequately studied when separated from tobacco smoke. We know that when a regular cigarette is inhaled, the chemicals in it can cause cancer and lung problems. We don’t know how the body reacts to pure nicotine without these other chemicals — it could have its own set of negative health consequences.

Notably, former Surgeon General Richard Carmona — who highlighted the dangers of second-hand smoke during his tenure under George W. Bush — just joined the board of top selling e-cigarette company NJoy, Inc.

In March, Carmona said that he would be spearheading research into the health effects of inhaled nicotine and e-cigarettes.

Regulation

E-cigarette company NJoy sued the Food and Drug Administration in 2010 to prevent it from regulating the vaporizers as smoking cessation devices. The FDA is trying to regulate them as tobacco products via a proposal currently in the public review period. Beyond that, however, the FDA has limited options.

There is also no minimum age requirement and they are easily attainable online. This means young children purchase them with much less difficulty than buying a pack of smokes. They also come in flavors that kids could like such as chocolate, strawberry, and caramel.

Michael Tolmach, executive officer of Eonsmoke, LLC, told Business Insider in an email that, "Eonsmoke as a brand puts Surgeon General warnings on all products and support legislation that bans the sale of electronic cigarette to minors across all 50 American states and abroad. We only sell to licensed tobacco retailers and stress very harshly of the requirements to validate age when selling e-cigarettes."

Another confusing factor is that with some e-cigarettes, you are also inhaling a flavoring or other additives — not all of which are disclosed on the packaging.

For instance, Eonsmoke and LOGIC e-cigarettes deliver their nicotine using a polyethylene glycol or propolene glycol solution, along with other additives like glycerine and flavorings. Propylene glycol is considered to be safe by the FDA and is used in food, health, and cosmetic products, a LOGIC representative told Business Insider in an email.

With the great preponderance of different styles and brands of e-cigarettes out on the market, it is also difficult to study, since any one brand may have different ingredients or nicotine levels. These levels are sometimes higher than those in a tobacco cigarette.

Will they help you quit?

A recent study published in the journal Addiction in May 2012, showed that "electronic cigarettes can deliver clinically significant amounts of nicotine and reduce cigarette abstinence symptoms and appear to have lower potential for abuse relative to traditional tobacco cigarettes, at least under certain laboratory conditions."

The researchers brought 20 current cigarette smokers into the lab and had them test out e-cigarettes under laboratory conditions. They were then offered the choice of e-cigarette puffs, regular cigarette puffs, or money.

They tested the Vapor King from Vapor4Life in “WOW Cowboy” or “WOW Cowboy Menthol.”

The problem? It took new users 40 puffs of the e-cigarettes to get a good, consistent nicotine delivery — and the effects weren’t as fast or strong as a regular cigarette. They suggest this is because the vaporized nicotine entered the blood stream through the cheek instead of entering through the lungs as tobacco cigarette smoke does.

Experienced electronic cigarette users may be better at using them, however, and could get higher and faster nicotine levels with e-cigarettes, maybe on par with those from a tobacco cigarette, the study said.

Another report by the same researchers, published in February of 2012 in the journal Nicotine & Tobacco Research indicates that this could be true: Experienced e-cigarette smokers had higher nicotine levels and heart rates after they started inhaling nicotine, so they were basically better at smoking the e-cigarette and reliably got the nicotine high they were looking for, about equivalent to smoking tobacco cigarettes.

If the e-cigarettes are able to substitute for the tobacco cigarettes, it’s possible that one could use them to quit: first weaning yourself off of the tobacco, then off the nicotine inhaler, since it’s less addictive than the tobacco.

"We acknowledge that nicotine is an incredibly addictive drug and only advocate using Eonsmoke electronic cigarettes responsibly and by adult smokers only," Tolmach said. "We do not make any therapeutic or medical claims and consider the electronic cigarette as an unhealthy addiction."

Taking over?

Investment bank Citi named e-cigarettes as one of 10 technologies that will change the way the world does business.

A potentially cancer-free cigarette — despite all other concerns — is that big of a deal.

Citi projects $3.2 billion in global sales by 2015, up from $416 million in 2010.

While that's a huge market, however, it remains only a fraction of the global tobacco market, estimated at $700 billion in 2011. Whether e-cigarettes take a larger share will depend on many factors, including improved quality and unresolved questions about health.



#15 MosJan

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Posted 02 August 2013 - 05:23 PM

Doctors caution users of e-cigarettes, say vaping is worse than smoking the real thing
 
 


Photographer: Courtesy: WFTS

 05/30/2013

  • By: Linda Hurtado, WPTV

TAMPA, Fla. -- Touted as a safer alternative to traditional smoking, electronic cigarettes are supposed to give smokers their nicotine fix without the cancer-causing side effects of tobacco. But some have serious concerns that the battery-operated vaping devices may actually pose more dangers to users.

Gwynne Chesher lives in Florida, where smoking in most public places was banned more than eight years ago.  She's been smoking for more than 40 years.

“In 1965, everybody smoked, it was an acceptable thing to do back then," said Chesher.

At her worst, Chesher was puffing a pack a day and eventually, she tried to stop. 

"I tried the gum. It gave me a stomachache," she said.  "Tried the patch. It made my heart beat fast and scared me."

So when her son recently suggested yet something else, Chesher signed up.

"You just inhale like a cigarette," said Chesher, as she explained how to use an e-cigarette.  “It looks like smoke, but it's water vapor."

E-cigarettes, what some call "vaping," are battery operated.  They have the look and feel of a traditional cigarette, without the smell, the smoke and the harmful side effects, say its supporters. 

“I was really impressed," said Chesher.

Then her doctor weighed in. 

“He was like 'No way! You can't use those!'" she said.

Dr. Mike Feinstein, a spokesman for the American Lung Association said, “People are inhaling some type of chemical vaporized compound into their lungs without really knowing what's in it."

Last year, the American Lung Association issued its own warning about e-cigarettes: “This is a buyer stay away, a buyer health hazard, potentially."

Dr. Robert Greene treats lung cancer patients at the Palm Beach Cancer Institute and said the product is potentially a health hazard.

“There really is no information about whether they're safe or not, and that's part of the problem," said Greene.

He says with no real data on e-cigarettes, the three-year-old tobacco alternative may actually be more harmful that traditional cigarettes.

"The doses of nicotine that you get could conceivably be higher than what you would get in a typical cigarette," said Greene.

Ray Story is an e-cigarette distributor and CEO of the Tobacco Vapor Electronic Cigarette Association.

"To make that claim is obviously ludicrous," he said.  “At the end of the day when you look at an e-cigarette, is it addictive? Nicotine is addictive."

Authorities don't necessarily know what's inside of e-cigarettes, but the FDA tested a small sample just a few years ago and found a number of toxic chemicals including diethylene glycol, the same ingredient used in antifreeze.

“I understand they found all kinds of stuff," said Story.  "At one point in time you may have found whatever you want to find. If it cannot be substantiated by the other side, you have to question their motive."

The findings forced the Food and Drug Administration to issue a nationwide health warning.

Meanwhile, Chesher says she's decided to wash her hands of anything to do with electronic cigarettes.

“I have no problem throwing them in the trash," she said.

According to the Tobacco Vapor Electronic Cigarette Association, e-cigarettes contain just five ingredients, all approved by the FDA. Recently, the FDA announced it will begin to regulate e-cigarettes as a tobacco product.

Copyright 2013 Scripps Media, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Read more: http://www.kjrh.com/...g#ixzz2arCVWH1Q



#16 MosJan

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Posted 15 August 2013 - 01:08 PM

Call to Action! California E-Cigarette Usage Ban -- SB 648 (UPDATED -- Hearing Canceled!)
UPDATE (8/14/2013): Today's hearing on SB 648 before the Assembly Committee on Government Operations was canceled just an hour before it was set to begin.  Word on the ground is that SB 648 is dead until at least January.  Those in California should continue to respond to this Call to Action.

UPDATE (8/9/2013): The hearing for SB 648 is scheduled for Wednesday, August 14th at 1:30 P.M. in the State Capitol Building at 10th Street and L Street in Sacramento. The hearing will be held in Room 437. If you can attend, please plan to be there 30 minutes early.


UPDATE (7/30/2013): SB 648, which has already passed the California Senate, has been assigned to the California Assembly Committee on Government Organization.  Please see below for how to submit testimony directly to the committee.

The hearing on SB 648 has been set for Wednesday, August 14th at the California State Assembly in Sacramento, California.  If you can attend this hearing, please e-mail us at board@casaa.org.  This is a critical hearing and we are encouraging all California vapers to attend.
 
California citizens should not only submit testimony in opposition to SB 648, but you should also begin the process of contacting your own California State Assembly representative directly to encourage a NO vote on SB 648.  In these communications, make sure to include your address and phone number.  If possible, CASAA recommends asking for a face-to-face meeting with your Assembly member about this bill.
 
Vapers must remain vigilant against this legislation every step of the way. 

---


 
California: Attempt to Add E-Cigarettes to "Smoking" Ban -- SB 648

 

 

If enacted, this bill would: 
Ban the use of vapor products wherever smoking is banned. Among those provisions most likely to impact users are those that would:

  • Ban e-cigarette use in virtually all workplaces in California, including in hospitals. Violations would be punishable by fines of $100, $200, and $500. (Section 12)
  • Ban e-cigarette use inside or within 20 feet of any public building or in a vehicle owned by the state. (Section 4
  • Declares that the use of electronic cigarettes “may be a hazard to the health of the general public,” and would include e-cigarettes in all future smoking bans passed in California. (Section 11)
  • Ban e-cigarette use in railroads and air carriers. (Section 13)

You can watch the April 17, 2013 meeting of Senate Health Committee hearing here (beginning at the 34-minute mark). Featured speakers include CASAA Legislative Director Gregory Conley and Father Jack Kearney of the California Association for Alcohol & Drug Educators (CAADE). CASAA would like to thank the 40+ others turned out to oppose the bill, as well as the California Senators who opposed this bill when it was in the Senate.

If you are in California and can travel to Sacramento to attend a future hearing, please e-mail us at board@casaa.org with the subject line "California Testimony." We are going to need vapers throughout California to organize trips to Sacramento. Please help out in any way you can



#17 MosJan

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Posted 19 August 2013 - 04:23 PM

8 days  now  :) no cigarette

 

is it  fun / no - but again  smoking was not fun enter



#18 MosJan

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Posted 19 August 2013 - 04:37 PM

Vaping May Be Hazardous to Your Health
By the Editors Aug 18, 2013 3:00 PM PT

“Mind if I vape?”

The question may become more common as electronic cigarettes become more popular. The answer, however, remains elusive. Etiquette aside, the health effects of inhaling nicotine vapor (hence the term) are largely unknown. More research is clearly needed, but in the meantime, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has to start regulating e-cigarettes.

U.S. consumers will spend $1 billion on battery-powered smokes this year, 10 times more than they did four years ago. Are e-cigarettes, which come in such flavors as chocolate and butter rum, a benign device to help people stop smoking? Or are they just a new way to feed an old addiction? How safe, compared with tobacco smoke, is the vapor they create?

No one knows. The small studies that have been done so far hint at both pros and cons; one found that smokers cut back on real cigarettes after trying the electronic kind, while another found particles of metal and silicates in e-cigarette vapor that could cause breathing problems. That there are more than 200 brands containing varying levels of nicotine and other substances only makes it harder to assess their safety.

The FDA has indicated it will begin to regulate e-cigarettes this fall. After a federal judge ruled that it couldn’t classify them as medical devices (because they deliver a drug, nicotine), the FDA will regulate them as tobacco products (because nicotine is derived from tobacco). Unlike regular cigarettes, however, e-cigarettes are not known to be lethal. Wariness is warranted, but it’s safe to assume that their vapors are not nearly as dangerous as tobacco smoke.

The FDA’s approach, therefore -- and that of states and cities that regulate tobacco use -- should be two-pronged: It should find out whether e-cigarettes are indeed safe. And while it does, it should ensure that “vaping” remains restricted to adults who are fully informed of the potential risks.

To begin, e-cigarette makers should be required to report and label all ingredients in the nicotine solutions they use. Even though these deliver fewer poisons than are found in traditional cigarettes, they nevertheless have been found to contain carcinogenic nitrosamines and other harmful impurities derived from the tobacco, as well as the additive diethylene glycol, an ingredient in antifreeze.

Manufacturers should also disclose the amount of nicotine that can be inhaled from their e-cigarettes. Today’s models haven’t been found to give users as large a hit of nicotine as regular cigarettes do, but that may not always be the case. (Some bottles of solution meant to refill e-cigarette cartridges have been found to contain enough nicotine to kill an adult if ingested.) Once more is known about the potential hazards of e-cigarette vapors, the FDA may need to restrict certain substances or place limits on nicotine levels.

Then there is the issue of flavoring -- something the FDA forbids in standard cigarettes. All electronic cigarettes are flavored, so to ban flavoring would be to ban the product entirely. But it’s possible to allow tobacco- or even mint-flavored e-cigarettes and still ban or restrict flavors designed to appeal to children, hard as they may be to define.

While they’re at it, the FDA should also ban sales to those younger than 18 and restrict e-cigarette marketing and advertisements in much the same way it limits them for cigarettes. As for health warnings, the agency will need to wait for more data before deciding what exactly they should say.

States and cities, meanwhile, should include e-cigarettes in their restrictions on smoking in public places and office buildings, and apply the same rules on the retail sale of e-cigarettes as they do to tobacco products. Even in towns where there are few restrictions, bars and restaurants would be wise to prohibit “vaping” until they know whether it pollutes the air.

On the question of taxes, states and cities may want to act gradually. If e-cigarettes are found to be valuable smoking-cessation tools, then they may warrant a tax rate that’s lower than what’s imposed on real cigarettes.

It would be great if e-cigarettes turned out to be the breakthrough that gets people to give up smoking tobacco. In the meantime, we should all be careful that e-cigarettes not perpetuate a habit that society has come a long way toward snuffing out. Sensible regulation can help protect that progress.

To contact the Bloomberg View editorial board: view@bloomberg.net.



#19 Yervant1

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Posted 20 August 2013 - 10:21 AM

8 days  now  :) no cigarette

 

is it  fun / no - but again  smoking was not fun enter

Well done my friend, I know you can do it get rid of that bad habit. Good luck!!!!!!!! :) 



#20 MosJan

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Posted 29 August 2013 - 12:30 PM






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