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The Life of Karnig Kevorkian


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#1 onjig

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Posted 15 February 2019 - 04:56 PM

The Life of Karnig Kevorkian
Karnig Kevorkian was born in Chunkoush in Central Anatolia. which is on a tributary to the Euphrates. He arrived in Ellis Island in January 1912, at the age of sixteen. He went to Chicago, where he had an uncle and where many Chunkoushtsis lived. 

In 1915 as the news of the Armenian Genocide reached the west he joined the Gamavors who formed the Armenian Legion of the French Army, serving under General Joffre. The Armenians were called the "ian-ians."

At the end of World War One, he ended up in Tiflis and got involved with a Bohemian crowd of writers, poets, musicians. 

He returned to America in 1919, intending to return to Chicago; his ship came to Philadelphia. He met many Armenians in the city and, one thing leading to another, he was asked if he would edit an Armenian newspaper that they felt the city needed but which none of them felt capable of editing. He used to say, with a smile, "I agreed to do so temporarily, until they found someone else." 

That "temporarily" began in September 1919 and lasted until September 1962--forty-three years. He called the newspaper "Groong." 

Unlike the other newspapers, which were organs of the Armenian political parties or were connected with churches or other organizations, the "Groong" was independent, and remained so until the end. It was possibly the only and, thus, most successful independent Armenian newspaper in America. 

Also, unlike the other publications, it was a truly newspaper. It was the first to carry news about births and deaths, engagements and weddings, family and social events, church activities and picnics. It was also the first Armenian newspaper to use photographs. Almost from the very beginning, it serialized famous Armenian books; at the end, it was serializing the great Armenian writer Raffi's "Khent" ("The Fool"). It also carried a column of humor and an "English Page for our Armenian Youth" (actually two of its eight pages)- the first Armenian newspaper to try to appeal to the Armenian youth. 

Because it was an independent newspaper it had a wide and loyal circulation in New York and Detroit as well. Some wealthy Detroit Armenians admired the paper so much they wanted the "Groong" to remove to Detroit and be underwritten by them however Kevorkian declined the lucrative offer. 

He spent his retirement years writing the history of Chunkoush, the first volume of which was published in 1970. He was working on the second volume when he died in 1972. 

To much of the Armenian community he was known as "Baron Groong." >

 


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#2 onjig

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Posted 15 February 2019 - 05:03 PM

The murder of the Armenians of Chunkush

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://armenianweek...enian-genocide/

 

They brought the Armenians here. Thousands of them. They stripped them of their belongings and threw them into the chasm,” explains a Kurdish villager who had spotted us while driving by.

IMG_5307-web-300x200.jpg“They brought the Armenians here. Thousands of them. They stripped them of their belongings and threw them into the chasm.” Chasm appears as dark opening at the center. (Photo by Nanore Barsoumian)

We are standing at the mouth of a deep, eerie cleft—bottomless, according to the locals—called Dudan by Armenians and Kurds for centuries (also known as Yudan Dere).

“How do you know the Armenians were killed here?” I ask.

It’s not that I’m skeptical. We know from various survivor and perpetrator accounts that the 10,000 Armenians of Chunkush (Çüngüş, a district of the province of Diyarbakir) were led here by gendarmes and armed chetes in 1915, brutally murdered, and hurled into the chasm.

“There was a woman in our village. She lived to be 104,” he replies. “She saw it all.”

He pauses. “Everybody knows.”

We had already realized that everybody knew. In Chunkush, one of the locals, a teenager, had given us directions to Dudan where, he said, the entire population of the almost exclusively Armenian village had perished.

As we were driving in that direction, we asked a man where Dudan is. He jumped into our van and led us there. When we got to Dudan, our driver, a Kurd from Diyarbakir, asked him, “What happened here?”

“Nothing,” the man murmured.

“They say something happened to the Armenians here,” the driver insisted.

 

IMG_4502-web-300x225.jpgDudan is “a famous cavern [that] drops vertically downward several hundred feet. The entire population of the town [of Chunkush] were said to have been driven to their death in this cavern.” (Photo by Khatchig Mouradian)

At that point, the man became visibly angry. “I do not know,” he said, and stormed out of the van.

 

***

The murder of the Armenians of Chunkush constitutes one of the largest, most brutal in situ massacres of the Armenian Genocide. The Armenians from Chunkush were marched to Dudan—only two hours away by foot—and massacred on the spot. Historian Raymond Kevorkian writes:

 

 

 

https://armenianweek...enian-genocide/


Edited by onjig, 15 February 2019 - 05:15 PM.





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