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Loan Words In The Armenian Language


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#1 nairi

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Posted 12 December 2003 - 06:58 PM

This is in reference to THIS thread.

For quite some time now, I have maintained that there is nothing wrong with loan words in a language. Part of the reason that languages develop, evolve and grow is because of loan words. Armenian is no less guilty of it than many/most/all other languages.

Pollution or enrichment?

I specifically refer you to English, a language that has one of the largest vocabularies in the world. Up to 80% of English lexemes (words) are borrowed from over 120 languages around the world. Largely due to that, it has one of the most extensive, if not the most extensive, catalogs of synonyms and antonyms, each with its own nuanced denotation and connotation. Although it certainly lacks perfection in many areas, English is nevertheless one of the very few language in the world that can boast of flexibility, diversity and resourcefulness in its vocabulary.

So why do so many Armenians fear loan words? Why are we unable to take advantage of loan words so as to enrich our vocabulary? Why are we afraid that we will lose the little native vocabulary we still have because of loan words? Why can't we simply incorporate these loans, "Armenianize" them if you will, and place them side by side the native ones? Why pollution and not enrichment?

What are your views? Accept or reject loan words in Armenian?

#2 Arpa

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Posted 12 December 2003 - 08:07 PM

Nairi, what makes you think that we reject loan words?
If that were true then we had to throw away more than 50% of our vocabulary. What with loan words from the East, IndoIranian, south, Assyrian and Aramaic, even Arabic, West, Greek and Latin and others, and North?
The question is not our existing language which has been equally enriched by borrowing but ignoring our standard language which is practically complete and borrowing words which we already have. Those who don't know enough Armenian to know that we have a word for "system", "drutyun" will mindlessly dismiss the latter and use the former word, if armenianized as "sistema". Those who don't know the word "yeghern" will borrow "kenocid".

Edited by Arpa, 12 December 2003 - 08:18 PM.


#3 nairi

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Posted 13 December 2003 - 04:45 AM

Arpa, I meant in our modern day and age, why do we need a language police? What's wrong with using "genocid", "telefon" or "television" next to the already existing words for them? English is still borrowing words, even though it may already have 20 synonyms for each...

Some Armenians do know the Armenian words for all these words, but deliberately, for whatever reason, switch between the Armenian and the "foreign" word depending on the circumstance. What's wrong with that?

#4 Shahumyan

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Posted 13 December 2003 - 04:49 AM

Armenian words are so hard, all in the name of making it a "richer" language
eg "Behjijayin herakhos" or mobile..... its really annoying

#5 nairi

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Posted 13 December 2003 - 05:11 AM

QUOTE (Shahumyan @ Dec 13 2003, 11:49 AM)
eg "Behjijayin herakhos" or mobile..... its really annoying

I thought it was "cancayin herakhos" smile.gif

#6 Arpa

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Posted 13 December 2003 - 09:10 AM

QUOTE (nairi @ Dec 13 2003, 10:45 AM)
Arpa, I meant in our modern day and age, why do we need a language police? What's wrong with using "genocid", "telefon" or "television" next to the already existing words for them? English is still borrowing words, even though it may already have 20 synonyms for each...

Some Armenians do know the Armenian words for all these w
=======
What's wrong with that?

Nairi, you may have noticed that we are basically saying the same. My sentiments about this subject have been aired before. My point is imposrting words and replacing our own native and classical words and totally discarding the native ones. On the other hand my sentiments about composing new words for modern gizmos is ridiculous and laughable. I used the term "composing" as most of these words are compound ones. We take peide for the elasticity of our language but when we stretch that elasticity to a ridiculous end... A good example would be, and you know that this is a joke, but it illustrates the concept nevertherless, erkayna-khmora-klora-tsak. smile.gif smile.gif Why would not macaroni be enough? Yet we sriously compose words for telefon, helicopter, radio and the most ridiculous... herustatesutyun? when even the Bushmen of Africa use TV. And we expect others to learn our language?
Coming back to the main subject. By all means, let us borrow words for modern gizmos while we preserve and protect our native classical ones.
As shown under another topic, Armenian is just a dialect of the larger family of languages, and the way things are going one language will be the Lingua Franca of the world anyway.
English??? ohmy.gif wink.gif tongue.gif

#7 Stormig

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Posted 13 December 2003 - 09:31 AM

All set aside, I don't think that a challenging word for TV or anything else is going to discourage "others" from learning Armenian. I mean, come on, people learn Chinese, Japanese, etc.

#8 nairi

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Posted 13 December 2003 - 10:05 AM

QUOTE (Arpa @ Dec 13 2003, 04:10 PM)
Nairi, you may have noticed that we are basically saying the same.

Yes smile.gif

QUOTE (Storms)
All set aside, I don't think that a challenging word for TV or anything else is going to discourage "others" from learning Armenian. I mean, come on, people learn Chinese, Japanese, etc.

I'll have to agree with this one. First off, Armenian is challenging as it is smile.gif Long new words or short old ones.

Second, I don't see anything wrong in composing new words from either the native words we already have or the borrowed ones. A combination of the two would be just as good, imo. As long as the new words are easily recognizable and comprehensible, length is not so much of an issue for me. The more words, the more meanings, the more flexibility, the more comprehensibility... Although, yes, my preference would go to compact words, as opposed to lengthy loose ones, but either way, if it helps communication and comprehension, I don't have a problem with long and loose ones either.

On-topic: So we all agree that the language police of Armenia is redundant, if not plain ridiculous? smile.gif

PS. Sorry if this topic has already been discussed. I find it hard to find specific threads sometimes, considering that some of the more relevant discussions were held in the most irrelevant threads that were posted in the most irrelevant subforums...

#9 Arpa

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Posted 13 December 2003 - 11:24 AM

QUOTE (nairi @ Dec 13 2003, 04:05 PM)
Yes smile.gif

QUOTE (Storms)
All set aside, I don't think that a challenging word for TV or anything else is going to discourage "others" from learning Armenian. I mean, come on, people learn Chinese, Japanese, etc.

I'll have to agree with this one. First off, Armenian is challenging as it is smile.gif Long new words or short old ones.

========

On-topic: So we all agree that the language police of Armenia is redundant, if not plain ridiculous? smile.gif

PS. Sorry if this topic has already been discussed. I find it hard to find specific threads sometimes, considering that some of the more relevant discussions were held in the most irrelevant threads that were posted in the most irrelevant subforums...

Yes, it has been duscussed. On many occasions. This subject is older than Ararat-Urartu.
Funny you used the phrase "language police". smile.gif smile.gif

Here; http://armenians.com...t=0

As to otars learning our language, you may have noticed that many of them will flaunt their mastery of the language by insisting on "shnorhakal yem", next will be "herustatesutyun". It is almost comical why they do that. To show us that they are better than us? When many of us don't even use the phrase "shnorhakal yem" and instead use "merci/thank you" etc. Just imagine that you are in a business where you deal with people, any of the retail businesses where you thank the customer and visa versa about 4 times during each transaction. Do you blame them for not saying "shnorhakal yem" a thousand times a day?
Words like the one for macaroni and TV make good subjects for silly parlor games, but in everyday use?
Speaking of parlor games. Here is an old and recurring one.
What is the Armenian word for bamya? Yech!!! Pu!!! smile.gif smile.gif
The answer may surprise you.

#10 nairi

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Posted 13 December 2003 - 12:59 PM

QUOTE (Arpa @ Dec 13 2003, 06:24 PM)
What is the Armenian word for bamya? Yech!!! Pu!!! smile.gif smile.gif
The answer may surprise you.

Khot cool.gif

As for the State Language Inspection, or language police smile.gif, I think they'd be better off spending their time making an Armenian E-Dictionary than picking on non-Armenian business signs.

Oh, and this thread was in reference to (the article in) Aylaserum, as mentioned in my first post smile.gif

#11 Harut

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Posted 13 December 2003 - 01:45 PM

the only thing that bothers me about "borrowing" words is that they just don't sound right when used with other Armenian words in the sentence.
yes, "es inch lav program en tsuyts talis televisorov" may be more practical for some then "es inch lav tsragir en tsuyts talis herustatsuytsov", but it sounds so foreign to me.
plus, we all know about the habit we have, when you throw ours to the trash can and use others' as the best without giving it a second thought. well, it holds true when it comes to borrowing words too. we will completely lose ours.
one more plus, borrowed words bring a whole new nuance to the language, including new grammer. before doing that we have to consider, is ours so unpractical that we need to change it?

#12 Sip

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Posted 13 December 2003 - 01:54 PM

Something is borrowed only if we plan to give it back. Otherwise it's "adopted" (I think)

#13 Anoushik

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Posted 13 December 2003 - 02:05 PM

QUOTE (nairi @ Dec 13 2003, 10:59 AM)
As for the State Language Inspection, or language police smile.gif, I think they'd be better off spending their time making an Armenian E-Dictionary than picking on non-Armenian business signs.

Nairi, I think State Language Inspection is necessary for people like Armenians, who always want to simplify things. The Armenian culture keeps deteriorating and it is a very good idea that people have started to notice it and try to keep it under control.

Why "merci" when we have the beautiful Armenian "shnorhakalutyun"? In LA whenever "odars" ask how do you say "thank you" in Armenian most Armenians say "merci". NO, it's not Armenian, it's French. And "merci" is not even pronounced correctly by Armenians. I think it's a shame for our culture and it's about time Armenians started noticing it.

#14 Anoushik

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Posted 13 December 2003 - 02:17 PM

Also, "herustatesutyun" is the translation of "television". Why, is it really that hard to pronounce "herustatesutyun"? I don't think the problem is with pronounciation but it's just hard living in another country and sharing languages. In Armenia, everybody used to say "kholodelnik" instead of "sarnaran" for refrigerator. Or "marozhni" for "bachbachak" - ice cream (Russian words). While it is hard to not mix languages and everyone, including me, is guilty for doing it, people should still try their best to protect the language as much as possible. If not in talking in general, but at least on business signs on the streets everything should be written in pure Armenian. Armenians are educated people and we should know better than that.

#15 nairi

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Posted 13 December 2003 - 03:34 PM

QUOTE (Harut @ Dec 13 2003, 08:45 PM)
before doing that we have to consider, is ours so unpractical that we need to change it?

It's not about changing, but about enriching. The new words will of course carry their own denotation, connotation and nuance, but that's the whole point: to enrich the language with this diversity. Grammar has little to do with vocabulary.

Dear Anoushik, welcome to Hyeforum. My answer to you is in my first post, in particular in the questions that I posed, which for me are rhetorical.

Sip with his busy brain again smile.gif Lol. From that perspective, yes, all Armenian does is steal. At least English has the decency to give everything it borrowed back to the world smile.gif Will our xenophobic, narrow-minded language ever be able to do the same?

#16 Anoushik

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Posted 13 December 2003 - 03:39 PM

Nairi, maybe I've mistaken you. Can you give an example of what you're talking about? Example of a vocabulary that we could've borrowed?

#17 nairi

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Posted 13 December 2003 - 03:59 PM

Anoushik, I'm sorry, now I'm confused... smile.gif I'm not sure what you mean.

I was just referring to the fear factor that we as Armenians have toward our language to the point that we even feel the need for a State Language Inspection. Xenophobia being a key word, as well as total narrow-mindedness.

We have indeed borrowed (or adopted as Sip put so eloquently) many words since the beginning of time, so why are we afraid now? I'm sure Arpa could expand more on which words we borrowed and which we didn't.

Btw, for the sake of clarification: borrowing, in my argument, does NOT mean replacing native words with foreign ones; it means adding words to the already existing vocabulary. So that now we have two words for TV instead of just one.

And finally, this is merely my point of view, which of course, is flawed and certainly not absolute smile.gif

#18 Arpa

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Posted 13 December 2003 - 04:00 PM

QUOTE (anoushik @ Dec 13 2003, 08:17 PM)
Also, "herustatesutyun" is the translation of "television". Why, is it really that hard to pronounce "herustatesutyun"? I don't think the problem is with pronounciation but it's just hard living in another country and sharing languages. In Armenia, everybody used to say "kholodelnik" instead of "sarnaran" for refrigerator. Or "marozhni" for "bachbachak" - ice cream (Russian words).  While it is hard to not mix languages and everyone, including me, is guilty for doing it, people should still try their best to protect the language as much as possible. If not in talking in general, but at least on business signs on the streets everything should be written in pure Armenian. Armenians are educated people and we should know better than that.

Well! Blow me down! As that great philopsopher Popeye would say.
It had to take a big slap by Anoushik... Welcome! To wake us up and see that we are speaking in tongues. To see that we are reliving the proverbial "babeloni kharnakum", the Tower of Babel, and we are babeling, oops!, I mean babbling. Of course, people living in English speaking lands will have no problem with borrowing English/Latin words, just as those living in Polis will not even realize when using Turkish words, those in Lebanon and Syria will have no compunctions using Arabic words and not even realize, just as those living in russophile countries will say "marozhni" to mean icecream.
As mentioned before, this subject has been debated to the ground many times and invariably it ends up as politics everytime. Not to say that language is totally apolitical, but true scientific linguistics should try and stay above factional, political and even regional influences.

Merci, thank you, danka, stasibo, shukran, grazia...
And
Shnorh-a-kal em.
PS. Do you see where our phrase comes from?
I'll give you a hint. Not from merci, not from thank you, not from danka and neither from shukran.

#19 Yeznig

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Posted 13 December 2003 - 04:37 PM

I inadvertantly sumbitted a comment in the 'report' box. So apologies to Nairi!

There is no problem using imported (loan) words when no adequate Armenian equivalent exists or when the words are internationalised - telefon, video, cinema etc - for which of course quite adequate and charming Armenian words do exist.

But imported words are frequently used for unacceptable reasons. They are forced on a national language by a colonial power as part of an assimilationist endeavour. Such words are also often used by mediocrities seeking to strike a cultivated pose when in fact all they do is express contempt for things Armenian or express a sense of inferiority. The widespread use of imported words in the Armenian press in Armenia in my view reflects aspects of these negative trends. The Armenian elite has always, with few honourable exceptions attempted to ape things foreign, a vice against which the Armenian natonal revival fought with some vigour.

The Armenian language is peculiarly rich in part because of its ability to import words and integrte them into the grammar and syntax of the language. But redundant imports as any economist will tell you does the nation no good and indeed endangers its health.

For a brilliant contribution to this issue read Baryour Sevak Selected Works Volume 5, pp91 -146

#20 Arpa

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Posted 13 December 2003 - 04:56 PM

Well, well,! What do you know!!
I just happened to remember that I had translated this some time ago.
========
Sevak on Mother Tongue

Written by Paruyr Sevak, 1962, Erevan

ܺ вܺ ز
LET US PRESERVE AND ENRICH THE MOTHER TONGUE

ϳ ݻ ٳ , , ϳϳ, ۳
ٳ , ׳ ٻݳϳ ݻ
г ٳ, ɻٳ , ݳ
ݻ, ݹѳ ٳ ѳ ѳ ߳ѳ
ᷳ, ݳ, ݳ ۳


Mankind does not lack for sacred icons, but, doubtless, its most sacred
is "mother", for this reason it names its most sacred things after
"mother, the likes of "motherland" and "mother tongue". It is true,
there may be those who would "cut mother's breast", but as a whole
mother has dedicated and still does selfless, all giving care and
natural caress.
Her mother loving and mother caring children have jealously guarded and
protected their mother tongue beginning with Mashtots and our first
translators all the way to Narekatsi and Shnorhali, Dourian and Raffi,
Varouzhan and Charents.
During the four decades of Soviet rule that protection has reached huge
proportions, so much so that it has given our friends such joyful
results. We will not talk about about our schools and houses of
learning, not about the size of publications, nor about our universities
and academies of science. Suffice it to say that during the past 40
years armenology returned and established itself under the roof of the
fatherland, in doing so it also enriched the mother tongue tremendously
while in the meantime ridding it from such foreign nests as Venice and
Moscow, Vienna and Tiflis, Polis and Baku.
In the light of this bright of trustful and caring stage that dark
slice seems even darker under a reign of cult of the individual,
subscribed by people whose sins are even if understandable yet
unforgivable.
Many days have gone by since, whether suitable or not, our
intellectuals have returned to this painful subject numerous times, it
has been spoken about and written about. Of late this subject has been
visited again with renewed sanctity. By the mouth of the writers' union,
it has never been so powerful as when uttered by the lips none other
than V. Hambartsoumian. And, finally, the large radio audience heard it
from Gegham Saryan himself whose logical words also appeared on the
pages of "Sovetakan Dprots".
It is very difficult to add to Saryan's Thoughts About the Mother
Tongue article. It is difficult because the time has come that words
turn into action.
First I would like to say and stress that it is worrisome, not only
about those groups of words that were artificially glued to our lips,
but also about that sad scene that began and grew from that "glue"
turning into a kind of shield and guardianship.
As long as we are talking about that group of words let's begin.
Those words that curled around our tongues by a decree, none of those
European words have the least advantage over our native ones, not by
etymology, not by comprehension nor by agility. Furthermore, those words
are much inferior in etymology, comprehension and agility.
Let's consider the word dz (revolutsia)with ѻճ
(heghapokhoutyun).
First off revolutsia is much inferior to heghapokhoutyun
etymologically. The Latin origin is based on "to turn/to revolve" and
eve to "re-revolve" which by extension would mean " to turn back". The
Armenian word, by this sense, is based on "heghoul/heghel" which not
only means to turn, to overturn, not only to change but also to convert,
to render into another form, to create a quality from another quality.
Revolutsia cannot compete with the Armenian word even in agility.
Consider, heghapokhoutyun= revolutsia, heghapokhkan mitq=revolutsyon or
in the Armenian usage; revolutsyonakan, heghapokhakan mard=revolutsioner
and heghapokhakanner=revolutsyonerner. How do translate "heghapokhich"?
Also revolutsyon? How about heghapokhakanoutyun,
heghapokhanakatsoum,heghapokhakanoren, heghapokhvel, heghapokhoum and
finally heghapokhabar, heghapokhatyats, heghapokhamol,
heghapokhanshounch and so on with negative and collective suffixes .
This and many such words can multiply with negative prefixes like
"haka" or "an", as well as suffixes such as "outyun", thus with such
embellishments a single word can have about a hundred variants and new
words.
Let us try and substitute this with "revolutsia". Will sure hit that
proverbial brick wall, emanating such din that one only needs to hear.
Let us also mention that memorable fact that during the 20s and the
30s, those praiseful cries for revolution have gradually waned and
virtually disappeared from out poesy, simply because "revolutsia" and
its variations will fit poetry just like the awl hidden in a sack, one
can fit it to neither rhyme or meter.
This will be the outcome if we replace our native words with such as
"partia", "respublika", "konstitutsia", "delekat", "debutat" etc.
Of all these obligatory loans there may only be one word that may be
justifiable, "soviet". Of course our "khorhourd" may in fact encompass
the meaning of the Russian "coBet" and it may even act functionally,
just as it has done for many years. But "soviet" is a word that
expresses a new state rule, a new governmental type and new way of
governance that was born of the Russian Revolution. Today even the
Russians use the word to mean a new way of life just as the whole world
views it as such without going into the etymology. As such, od all the
alien words "soviet" may be the only one that does not burden our
vocabulary, neither dies it impoverish it.
Implementing alien words must foremost be considered by its
equilibrium. If we were to act with common sense would we feel the need
to borrow such words "park" to replace "sbosaygi", or "/tsekh" to
replace "gordzaran" (factory). Do you think the Russians would have
borrowed such a word it it replaced some of their native ones? Imagine
that we hear a million times a day phrases like "the plan of Tsekh has
not been attained", "tsekh has been yielding wonderful results" etc. You
would think that the workers and the management would declare a word
boycott considering that it means "mud" in Armenian.
Let us get back to our principal concept that the decree to adopt a
group of words may have been bad but not a total disaster. The real
disaster is that a horde of words shielded by this decree have invaded
the arena with such dire multitude that can only be described by that
Greek word "barbarian" which the ancient Armenians called "invaders".
Using loan words has turned into something chic, educated,
sophisticated, as if by using "glkharg" instead of "tasak" and "shlyapa"
instead of "glkharg" will in fact change what is inside the head. This
infection has not only spread among the intellectuals but also in all
segments of the population, even the writers and literaries. So many
literary and esthetic works are being written whose authors are under
the naive premise that they will impart an aura of intelligence when use
"esthetica" instead of "geghagitoutyun", "lyrika" and not
"qnarergoutyun", it is not "artsak" anymore it is "prozia", not
"tateragroutyun" but "dramatourkia", not "menakhosoutyun" but
"monolokia", not "erkakhosoutyun" but "dialokia", not "houyz" but
"emotsia", "not glkhavor" but "kardinal", not "skzbounq" but "printsip",
not "arajadimakan" and "pahpanoghakan" but "prokressiv" and
"konservativ", not "amsagir" or "handes" but "journal", not "gaghapar"
but "idia" and "idiolokia", not.. not... not "ergidzaban" but
"stairika".
May your ears ring Baronian/Paronian**!!
Do you remember how he treated Gr. Ardzrouni's "Indouktiv, khmbagir
deduktiv 'Mshak' "?
Considering the language our newspapers use today, w can safely say
that we lack "inductive" editors and correspondents to our "deductive"
papers.
Baronian, may his soul shine, speaking of the language of Ardzrouni
writes about a fictitious telegram; "Reynal scolded the was minisder
that he did not utilize strict mezhuras against a senador and took
lekidimakan demonstrations. The kapined was willing to give him
temitsions. The records of the pyutje have been accepted by the senad,
the kretid of the bishops have been rejected and the meeting sessia is
considered closed. The pyuledin announces that the queen has plevrit".
Of course this item would have raised a Homeric laughter during
Paronian's time. But now we see nothing to laugh as during these two
decades we are already accustomed to such linguistic confusion,
something that Lenin has labeled "Fransnizhegorodyan Lexicography".
We have reached this reproachable stage, w e repeat, since the use of
alien words has become some kind of symbol of civilization and being
civilized, a sign of intelligence while in fact it is just the contrary,
it is a sign od ignorance, an intellectual poverty, since not being able
to speak in complete native words can be considered anything short of
that.
Do you think that there may bo those who are deliberately "murkying the
water" so they can "fish" by interpreting our position that we are
totally opposed to usage of alien words. We well aware of the history of
the Armenian language, and we know the proportion of loaned words. But a
language needs a balance and not a burden. All peoples have practiced
verbal exchange and many are still doing it. Exchanging and loaning
serves a good purpose, it complements what is missing. If such loans are
necessary then they will beautify and enrich, but if they unnecessary
they will not only corrupt but also burden.
For centuries the Armenian language has not only developed on it own
but also by necessary exchange. It is going on even today. In only the
last 40 years our language has accepted and digested hundreds of new
words in so doing our language has grown. Our fast moving century is
bearing new views every day, new branches of science, we are surrounded
with new objects and gadgets that it is impossible to not invent new
words as well, only a feeble minded would oppose such a reality.
One must not forget that each language has its particular advantage
that others may lack. Armenian, for instance, has one major advantage
that very fee others possess, it the ease of word formation. And if any
language that may be even more rich and agile than ours feels compelled
to borrow if they find forming new words difficult and tedious. This is
not the case with ours, forming new words using our native ones will
reveal much more about it than the mere and dry alien one.
If our ancestors had behaved as we do now our children would never have
known words like "tvabanoutun, erkrachapoutyun, bnagitoutyun,
ashkharagroutun, kensabanoutun,bousabanoutyun, kendanabanoutyun," which
were novelties in their time just as "mijoukayin tesoutyun, kipernetika"
are today. While we are not only not creating Armenian equivalents to
these we are also ignoring long established words and replacing them. We
have forgotten that many Greek works would have been lost forever if it
weren't for their Armenian translations. Then why are we replacing
tramabanoutyun with logika, erkrabanoutyun with keolokia...banasiroutyun
with filolokia. Russian children know by heart the words of Turgenev;
"Protect the purity of (our)language as if sanctity. Never use alien
words. The Russian language is so rich and malleable that w we need not
borrow from those poorer than ours". Some 60 years after that Gorky
repeats it if slightly different words.
It is our duty to inspire the Armenian child and the youth with this
same spirit. Under the guise of enriching our tongue, to viewed as a
purist and old fashioned, to look more intelligent, some of us have
reached such ridiculous (irate) stage that words of Fonvizin sound so
apt; "As if speaking Russian we are blabbering the French". Our language
is suffering much more than that. Not only our vocabulary has fallen
victim but has also our idiom. Many are justifying by sayning ;" They
are already speaking this way". We will fight it not only verbally but
also in writings.
It is uniquely worrisome to talk about the paucity of our spoken
language, the half hearted desire to profit from it with a voluntary
mendaciousness. Words live not in dictionaries nor do they in books.
Their life is in in their usage. Language is a tool, a tool lives by
usage otherwise it will rust an rot.
Every nation and all peoples bring their share into the warehouse of
culture. Our share does not lack in that respect. We have excellent
music, glorious architecture, priceless scripture. First class
institutions, the likes of the Matenadran. Our literature and poetry has
produced masterpieces. Our ancestors have not cheated us , but we must
understand and by the same token not forget that our greatest legacy is
our language.
Having come from immemorial times, passing through many centuries,
having interacted with numerous peoples and their languages, the
Armenian tongue has become some kind of a unique encyclopedia of all
those years and all those peoples. Therefor, our language does not just
belong to us but it belongs to the entire world, it is not only sacred
for us but to all mankind. For that reason it is not only being studies
at our institutions and universities but in the universities oaf many
countries. Even then its care and nurturing falls on our shoulders.
Other institutions are not equipped to that, it is our duty to do it
here. So, we will our language not only in that light but also because
with its four literary variations and multiple dialects it is an
immeasurable capital that we must pass on to the entire humanity....
Knowing this we will boast but we will care and nurture that mother
tongue so not to let it fall victim to the mold that sprouted in those
dark days of "cult of the individual".




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