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What these phrases mean in Armenian


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#21 MJ

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Posted 27 October 2001 - 07:40 AM

Gold - vosky

Silver - Ardzat

Tin - Aruir (I am not sure about this one)

Copper - Bghindz

Iron - Yergat

#22 ThornyRose

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Posted 27 October 2001 - 08:17 AM

<wheeze out>
OK. I withdraw my query.

#23 wh00t

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Posted 27 October 2001 - 05:26 PM

Thorny, being an Istanbul-Armenian, here are some Turkish words I use when speaking Armenian:

- satget (I believe this is Turkish, a mean way of saying "to die", ie. "to croak". I have heard this word in an Armenian movie)
- I wasn't aware that "bızdik" meant small in Western Armenian only, but that's what I use
- chop teneke (trash can)
- bedavah (free)
- ama (but, instead of Armenian "payts")

Many other words I use in day-to-day conversation that I'm not even aware are Turkish... much to my embarrasment when speaking to non-Bolsahyes.

#24 MJ

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Posted 27 October 2001 - 06:20 PM

quote:
Originally posted by wh00t:
- satget (I believe this is Turkish, a mean way of saying "to die", ie. "to croak".


Satgets is an Armenian word.

#25 ThornyRose

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Posted 27 October 2001 - 10:13 PM

quote:
Originally posted by wh00t:
Thorny, being an Istanbul-Armenian, here are some Turkish words I use when speaking Armenian:

- satget (I believe this is Turkish, a mean way of saying "to die", ie. "to croak". I have heard this word in an Armenian movie)
- I wasn't aware that "bızdik" meant small in Western Armenian only, but that's what I use
- chop teneke (trash can)
- bedavah (free)
- ama (but, instead of Armenian "payts")

Many other words I use in day-to-day conversation that I'm not even aware are Turkish... much to my embarrasment when speaking to non-Bolsahyes.



Are both parents of yours from Istanbul? And have you been there?

quote:
Originally posted by MJ:


Satgets is an Armenian word.



'Zactly... I mean, it is not Turkish. I was like, HUH?? when you suggested it might be.
And exactly what does "satgets" mean?

#26 Azat

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Posted 27 October 2001 - 10:41 PM

quote:
Originally posted by Thorny Rose:


'Zactly... I mean, it is not Turkish. I was like, HUH?? when you suggested it might be.
And exactly what does "satgets" mean?



dead, but mostly used for animals and not humans.

#27 ThornyRose

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Posted 28 October 2001 - 12:07 PM

Like we use "gebermek" (to perish) and "ürkmek" (to be scared) for animals rather than humans, I suppose...

#28 wh00t

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Posted 28 October 2001 - 05:58 AM

Thorny, both my parents are from Istanbul, but they met in Canada.

About five years ago, I visited Turkey for a month. There, I met my grandparents, my aunt, my uncle, and my cousins (all on my father's side), in addition to many, many other relatives on both my mother and father's sides. I stayed mainly in the Kadikoy and (my favorite) Cinarcik area. My sister and I are the only ones in the family who aren't fluent in Turkish.

#29 ThornyRose

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Posted 28 October 2001 - 07:09 AM

quote:
Originally posted by wh00t:
My sister and I are the only ones in the family who aren't fluent in Turkish.


Tsk tsk tsk... Shame. Each language you know is an asset... (If you stick to it once you start - not grab out here and there like me. LOL...)
And then what is your standing in the family when it comes to speaking Armenian? I understand that there are quite a few kids of this generation who learn and speak Armenian although their grandparents or parents don't/didn't... Quite an interesting phenomenon...

#30 wh00t

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Posted 28 October 2001 - 09:01 AM



Tsk tsk tsk... Shame. Each language you know is an asset... (If you stick to it once you start - not grab out here and there like me. LOL...)


I know, I should take advantage of the fact that my peers speak it... it will make it much easier to learn.

And then what is your standing in the family when it comes to speaking Armenian? I understand that there are quite a few kids of this generation who learn and speak Armenian although their grandparents or parents don't/didn't... Quite an interesting phenomenon...


Nope, all my relatives are fluent in Armenian, too.

#31 Arpa

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Posted 29 October 2001 - 12:30 AM

quote:
Originally posted by MJ:


Satgets is an Armenian word.



Correct!

As a rule what is common to Armenian and Turkish is always Armenian. At the present satak/sadag is commonly used to describe a dead animal, i.e. carcass. The Turkish equivalent is "lesh". It is an undignified way of death as in "shan satak"(a dog's death). Verbs like "satkil/satketsnel" follow.
Originally it was used in a much more noble context. In PC (pre-Christian) times a "satak" was the animal offering at the altar, the remains of which was offered to to the faithful to partake.
Hence "zadak/zatik/Zadig".

Does the Arabic/Turkish "sadaqa" (alms/handout/faithful) have any connection?

#32 aurguplu

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Posted 29 October 2001 - 12:33 AM

quote:
Originally posted by Thorny Rose:
Actually, I was also curious about the names of metals in Armenian: gold, silver, tin, copper, and iron.
In Turkish, they are altın, gümüş, kalay, bakır, and demir, respectively. Save altın and demir (which I know to be Turkish, originally altun [as in Altun-Orda] and temir [Genghis Khan's original name Timujin is our "temirji" - ironsmith]), I don't know if the others are Turkish or not. Maybe I might not look for the answers to the others (which I don't know anything about) in Armenian, but who knows? Maybe there has been an exchange there, as well.



thorny,

gümüş (silver) is also old turkic (it occurs in the köktürk inscriptions). bakır also appears to be old turkic. there is one word, tunç (bronze) that i know to be chinese. altın and demir are common to turkic and mongolian (in mongolian they are atan and temür, respectively) and the name of the altai mountains means "golden mountain" either in turkic or mongolian, or their common ancestor (if they had one, which is doubted today).

the turkic words for the metals are funny in that they are not monosyllabic, may be demir and bakır were something like tem-ür and bak-ur respectively, the -ur bit being a suffix denoting metal. since they occur in chuvash, which is a descendant of hunnic, they are common turkic, i.e. were there before christ.

of the other matel names, pirinç (in german "messing" i think it is the same metal as the one we call "german silver") i think is persian.

#33 aurguplu

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Posted 29 October 2001 - 12:44 AM

quote:
Originally posted by Arpa:


Correct!

As a rule what is common to Armenian and Turkish is always Armenian. At the present satak/sadag is commonly used to describe a dead animal, i.e. carcass. The Turkish equivalent is "lesh". It is an undignified way of death as in "shan satak"(a dog's death). Verbs like "satkil/satketsnel" follow.
Originally it was used in a much more noble context. In PC (pre-Christian) times a "satak" was the animal offering at the altar, the remains of which was offered to to the faithful to partake.
Hence "zadak/zatik/Zadig".

Does the Arabic/Turkish "sadaqa" (alms/handout/faithful) have any connection?



arpa,

1. as a rule what is common to turkish and armenian is not always armenian. in many cases, in fact, it is arabic, persian, georgian, circassian, hittite, greek, sumerian, akkadian, hebrew and god knows what else.

2. the turkish word "leş" is arabic, if i remember my arabic correctly (i havent had much contact with it since university). it is at any rate not a turkish word, since it begins with a "l-".

3. the turkish word "sadaka" is arabic for alms, and it comes from a triliteral root "s-d-q". whether the root itself is a borrowing i cannot answer without a good arabic etymological dictionary, but if it is, then it is most unlikely to be borrowed from armenian, since the two were not in contact prior to islam, and the root occurs in the koran. it means "to be true, truthful, asceratined, confirmed".

hope this will help.

cheers,

#34 MJ

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Posted 29 October 2001 - 12:48 AM

Welcome to the forum, Arpa. You send good vibes.

Look forward to your participation.

#35 ThornyRose

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Posted 28 October 2001 - 01:26 PM

Are sadaqa and sadiq of the same root?

#36 dragon

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Posted 28 October 2001 - 01:29 PM

Most probably

We can say ''sadaqan sadiqin sadag arets hummm...sounds ok I guess

#37 ThornyRose

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Posted 28 October 2001 - 01:45 PM

Hey, let's do some tongue twisters!

In English:
Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled pepper! (There was more to it than this much, I think.)

I am never able to get this one correct:
She sells sea shells on the shore!
It once came out, "She sells sea shells on the sore!" LOL...

In Turkish:
Sarımsağı sarımsaklasak da mı saklasak yoksa sarımsaklamasak da mı saklasak?!

Posted Image

#38 dragon

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Posted 28 October 2001 - 01:50 PM

Wow Rosa, its really funny I'm laughing till death The turkish one was great!!!!!

#39 dragon

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Posted 28 October 2001 - 02:04 PM

Try these ''tsougu oudem mougu nedem
mougu nedem tsougu oudem ''
you have to read fast

#40 Azat

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Posted 28 October 2001 - 02:04 PM

quote:
Hey, let's do some tongue twisters!

In English:
Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled pepper! (There was more to it than this much, I think.)



Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers.
A peck of pickled peppers Peter Piper picked.
If Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers,
How many pickled peppers did Peter Piper pick?


quote:
I am never able to get this one correct:
She sells sea shells on the shore!
It once came out, "She sells sea shells on the sore!" LOL...

I think this one is "by" the sea shore. I can get this one, but not the other one.

quote:

In Turkish:
Sarımsağı sarımsaklasak da mı saklasak yoksa sarımsaklamasak da mı saklasak?!

Posted Image

What does it mena?




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