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Բարէվ. Help Would Be Appreciated.


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#41 Korelyi

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Posted 27 December 2006 - 02:42 AM

Hey, can anyone, or does anyone know where I can, talk with a microphone to others who speak Armenian?

Perhaps a chatroom where it is spoken, or someone on the forums that has a microphone could talk to me to help with pronunciation and grammar.

It would be a huge help.

Thanks biggrin.gif

#42 hosank

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Posted 28 December 2006 - 12:10 AM

lol..you could speak with me if you like...

but im sure they have sites...

#43 Korelyi

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Posted 28 December 2006 - 12:35 AM

QUOTE(hosank @ Dec 28 2006, 01:10 AM) View Post
lol..you could speak with me if you like...

but im sure they have sites...


That would be fine. Ventrilo, Teamspeak, MSN? Choose thy weapon. tongue.gif

#44 Johannes

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Posted 24 March 2007 - 01:01 AM

Այս բարոնն ալ ժամանակին այդքան խանդավառ մօտեցաւ, բայց վէրջը անյայտացաւ:


#45 Էլիա

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Posted 27 April 2007 - 10:12 PM

Բարեւ Քորելի: smile.gif

Իմ անունս Էլիա է: (My name is Elia.)

I'd be glad to help you with anything, even though I'm Western Armenian, but I could still help with stuff that you don't understand! biggrin.gif

Ցտեսութիւն: (Goodbye)

#46 vahan79

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Posted 23 May 2007 - 01:32 PM

QUOTE(Korelyi @ Dec 22 2006, 07:19 PM) View Post
Well I'm confused. What is the rule for using either ե or է? I know that է sounds more like the E in hey, and ե sounds more like the E in pen.


I think they sound the same. It's an orthographic rule, not a pronunciation rule.

In EA, you always use "ե" for "e" in the middle or end of words, and almost always use "է" for "e" in the beginning of words. The only exception really is for the verb forms of լինել (to be): եմ, ես, ենք, եք, and են for which we use "ե"... but note that third person singular "e" as in "he or she is" is still written with "է"....

Also, of course, if a word starts with "ye" sound, you use "ե"...

In other words, if you want the "e" sound it's almost ALWAYS "ե" if it's in the middle/end of word, and "է" in the beginning of the word. EXCEPT for what I just described.

hope that helps...




#47 Arpa

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Posted 23 May 2007 - 02:01 PM

QUOTE(vahan79 @ May 23 2007, 07:32 PM) View Post
I think they sound the same. It's an orthographic rule, not a pronunciation rule.

In EA, you always use "ե" for "e" in the middle or end of words, and almost always use "է" for "e" in the beginning of words. The only exception really is for the verb forms of լինել (to be): եմ, ես, ենք, եք, and են for which we use "ե"... but note that third person singular "e" as in "he or she is" is still written with "է"....

Also, of course, if a word starts with "ye" sound, you use "ե"...

In other words, if you want the "e" sound it's almost ALWAYS "ե" if it's in the middle/end of word, and "է" in the beginning of the word. EXCEPT for what I just described.

hope that helps...

Then why is Երեբունի/Erebuni is pronounced as Էրեբունի
If you guys only knew what you are talking about!!
Ե was never meant to sound like Ye as in the Russian Eltsin/Yeltsin, it is the counterpart of the Greek Epsilon where as the Է is supposed to sound like somethning between E and I. My take of it is that Է is supposed to sound like the English A as in "bad", as seen in many of the regional dialects, as in էշէկ , not եշեկ, which in declension turns to ishuk, not yishuk or yeshuk.

Edited by Arpa, 23 May 2007 - 02:34 PM.


#48 vahan79

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Posted 24 May 2007 - 08:58 PM

QUOTE(Arpa @ May 23 2007, 02:01 PM) View Post
Then why is Երեբունի/Erebuni is pronounced as Էրեբունի
If you guys only knew what you are talking about!!
Ե was never meant to sound like Ye as in the Russian Eltsin/Yeltsin, it is the counterpart of the Greek Epsilon where as the Է is supposed to sound like somethning between E and I. My take of it is that Է is supposed to sound like the English A as in "bad", as seen in many of the regional dialects, as in էշէկ , not եշեկ, which in declension turns to ishuk, not yishuk or yeshuk.


I am not talking about your fantasy world where we pronounce things according to guesstimations of how they were pronounced in proto-classical armenia. I was answering a question about how to distinguish the use of the two letters TODAY.

(1) Other than an example of a classical city, can you come up with something else that disproves the rule I have offered for spelling in Eastern Armenian?

(2) In Armenia, they spell Erebouni as Էրեբունի, anyway, whether you like it our not. In fact, if you google both, you will see that your preferred spelling only has 8 hits and the other has 924. Also, of the 8, one is one of your earlier posts on this forum, so let's just count it as 7. wink.gif

(3) You are not helpful. If people are here asking questions about how to spell things and pronounce things TODAY in Eastern Armenian, what good is bringing up that "ye" never existed in early Armenian? Also, how is Russian when Western Armenian has it, too? Also, how did we make the "y" sound for our words like "yerek"...or are you saying it was pronounced "aarek". Also, your theory is interesting because Persian has a as in bad and a as in awe, but it is usually considered to be a form of "a" not "e", whereas our letter looks very "e-ish"....I think the better estimation is that one is supposed to be the "ay" sound in "day" and the other is supposed to be "e" sound in "etch"...


#49 vahan79

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Posted 24 May 2007 - 09:16 PM

QUOTE(Arpa @ May 23 2007, 02:01 PM) View Post
Then why is Երեբունի/Erebuni is pronounced as Էրեբունի
If you guys only knew what you are talking about!!
Ե was never meant to sound like Ye as in the Russian Eltsin/Yeltsin, it is the counterpart of the Greek Epsilon where as the Է is supposed to sound like somethning between E and I. My take of it is that Է is supposed to sound like the English A as in "bad", as seen in many of the regional dialects, as in էշէկ , not եշեկ, which in declension turns to ishuk, not yishuk or yeshuk.


Reading your earlier post, I see you have pondered the letter H (ETA) and why it is pronounced in a certain way. Allow me to explain, because I speak Greek. H or ETA in ENGLISH is actually written HTA (ήτα) in Greek. The reason it has been transliterated as "ETA" is because it is believed that in Ancient Greek the letter was pronounced like "ay" as in "say". Thus, "agape" (αγάπη) is pronounced as "a-gah-pay" by scholars of Ancient Greek. This is different than E (EPSILON) because that is pronounced "e" as in "etch" (just as I have explained what I think to be the difference between the two "e's" in classical armenian pronunciation). Thus, HMERA (ημέρα) or "day" would be pronounced "ay-me-ra", both "e" sounds being slightly different.

Today, that is, in Modern Greek, we pronounce "HTA" as "i", so it is the same as "I" (IOTA). In fact, there are several letters and letter combos that all sound like "i" in modern Greek: Y (or upsilon, pronounced today as "ipsilon"), I (or iota), OI (omicron iota), EI (epsilon iota), and last, but not least, H ("eta"). Of course all of these had different sounds in Ancient Greek, probably: "oo", "i", "oy", "ey", and "ay" respectively, but no one is sure.




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